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War On Dust: Silverstone's Mammoth MM01 Chassis Features HEPA Filter Technology

Silverstone Technology announced the latest edition to its robust computer chassis lineup with the Mammoth Series MM01. The company set about designing a full-size case that could accommodate larger hardware while remaining dust free. Because higher-end and larger components generally give off more heat, a sealed chassis that could work for low-end, compact components would not be ideal. A better air filter was the solution.

The MM01 is the first computer chassis that has ever featured filters with HEPA technology. HEPA filters are frequently used in Clean Room factories, operating rooms and laboratories that require a dust-free environment. These filters are designed to remove airborne particles as air passes through them with much better efficiency than standard dust filters found in computers.

Due to the highly restrictive nature of HEPA filters, Silverstone included a pair of Air Penetrator fans with a combined rating of 340 cfm. Silverstone said this is a similar level of air pressure as found in a typical household fan. The company said these fans provide ample airflow to cool down high-end components through the restrictive filters.

Along with the removable HEPA filter, Silverstone's MM01 chassis features downward-facing vent openings. This approach is meant to prevent liquid from entering through the vents in the event that the case is splashed with something. The company designed this case to withstand hard environments that aren't typically suitable for computer use.

Dust Filters, Too

In addition to the Mammoth MM01 case, Silverstone released a line of dust filters that feature anti-vibration silicone. The FF124BY dust filters are designed for 120 mm fans and are constructed with a two-piece design. A silicone layer absorbs vibration, and a plastic section holds the filter screen in place. When the two components are put together, the filter is 5 mm thick, which Silverstone said should fit between any fan and chassis. The company further claimed that these filters can reduce fan noise by as much as 4dB. 

Silverstone will release both the Mammoth MM01 case and the FF124BY fan filters on August 21. The filters will be priced at $11.44, while the case will carry a price tag of $330. 

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  • Richard Wolff
    Cool idea, not sure I would buy.
    Reply
  • MatchstickMan
    For $330, that's a pretty hard sell for me...
    Reply
  • confus3d
    Can you easily pop out the filters and wash them or do you have to continuously buy replacements? I'd love a dust-free case but at $330 + filters I'll just stick to air dusters. 'Course if I didn't mind dropping $330 on a case I guess I wouldn't mind buying new filters... Just my $0.02 ;)
    Reply
  • royalcrown
    That front facade looks BAD ASS !! I like this case !
    Reply
  • synphul
    Looks like a nice idea. My concern is the restrictive nature of the hepa filters which are usually found on really high pressure systems such as air ducts in a clean room or vacuum cleaners. They mentioned purposely using their air penetrator fans which makes sense. However even the fine mesh filter the enthoo pro uses is enough to greatly restrict the flow (and even cause some blow back) from noctua pressure optimized 140mm fans at 1500rpm. If fine mesh is capable of being that restrictive I can't imagine a hepa especially once it's coated with dust.

    Of course for $330 I think they should have gone really 'performance' and hooked up a snorkel with a k & n filter and multiple delta fans. To top it off, audio on boot up of larry the cable guy yelling "git 'er done!"
    Reply
  • razor512
    Really bad idea. I tried it in the past, and while there was a significant drop in airflow (had to increase the fan speed). The main issue is that after a few weeks, the airflow drops to unsustainable levels. It pretty much requires you to have a high quality filter, filtering the room air, then the case filter handling whatever is missed.
    One of the main issues with the high end filters, is that you cannot clean them. You can vacuum out the larger dust particles, but it does not really do much to restoring the airflow. There are many tiny particles that get stuck in between the fibers of the filter (it is designed to do that). This is pretty much why you see those less effective mesh filters on most cases, they are easy to clean and last he life of the case.
    Reply
  • royalcrown
    Honestly, i'd throw out the filter and just have a bad ass case.

    16453357 said:
    Really bad idea. I tried it in the past, and while there was a significant drop in airflow (had to increase the fan speed). The main issue is that after a few weeks, the airflow drops to unsustainable levels. It pretty much requires you to have a high quality filter, filtering the room air, then the case filter handling whatever is missed.
    One of the main issues with the high end filters, is that you cannot clean them. You can vacuum out the larger dust particles, but it does not really do much to restoring the airflow. There are many tiny particles that get stuck in between the fibers of the filter (it is designed to do that). This is pretty much why you see those less effective mesh filters on most cases, they are easy to clean and last he life of the case.

    Reply
  • synphul
    Well so much for making wisecracks. Not quite what I was thinking but apparently it's already been done. Go figure lol.

    http://www.knfilters.com/news/news.aspx?id=3099
    Reply
  • royalcrown
    When I click "search for vehicle" my computer isn't listed. It's a 1997 Gigabye Focus with 2 liter CPU and automatic graphics card...

    16454831 said:
    Well so much for making wisecracks. Not quite what I was thinking but apparently it's already been done. Go figure lol.

    http://www.knfilters.com/news/news.aspx?id=3099

    Reply
  • rantoc
    Some HEPA filters dont have a huge air resistance and choosing the right fans for the pressure loss should allow for good airflow without to much noise.

    The big question i have is the filter washable? At first glance it don't look like the washable type of hepa meaning it will have to be replaced somewhat frequently and that can add to the cost quite abit in the long run
    Reply