Skip to main content

WD Elevates Red, Red Pro HDDs To 10TB With Helium

Western Digital announced two new 10TB additions to the Red and Red Pro product lines. The two series support network-attached storage (NAS) systems and RAID arrays, and the new 10TB option allows users to increase data capacity in devices built for home and medium-sized businesses.

Western Digital has already shipped over 15 million helium-filled HDDs under the WD and HGST brands. When initially introduced in 2012, some feared the HelioSeal would allow the precious gas to escape, rendering the drive useless, but the technology has shipped for five years and has an established history of reliability. WD has also shipped 16 million Red- and Red Pro-branded HDDs in the same general time frame, and the series has become a favorite for users looking for reliable disks to use in NAS environments.

“In July 2012, we introduced the WD Red line to address the unique performance, compatibility and scalability challenges facing home and small business NAS customers,” said Brendan Collins, vice president, devices business unit at Western Digital. “Five years and over 16 million WD Red family hard drives later, we continue to advance the platform, bringing our innovative HelioSeal platform and other advanced technologies that allow customers to meet their evolving private cloud needs.”

ProductRed 10TBRed Pro 10TB
Pricing (MSRP)$494.00$533.00
RPM Class5,400 RPM7,200 RPM
Cache256MB256MB
Sequential Read and WriteUp to 210 MB/sUp to 240 MB/s
Warranty3-Years5-years

The more affordable Red line supports small arrays and uses a 5,400 RPM motor. The new 10TB model is the first in the series to utilize a massive 256MB DRAM buffer. This ensures the new red 10TB drives will be the fastest in the series to date. WD claimed the series can sustain up to 210 MB/s sequential read and write speeds. The new addition will sell for $494 at launch, and some online sellers list the drive as available at press time. The WD Red 10TB carries a three-year warranty term.

The Western Digital Red Pro works effortlessly in smaller NAS systems but can scale the drive count for larger systems. WD recommends this series for up to 16 drives in an array. As the number of drives increase, so does the vibration in the system, and more advanced technologies must be employed to sustain reliability and disk performance. The Red Pro uses 7,200 RPM rotating platters and the same 256MB DRAM buffer found in the new 10TB Red. This series carries a five-year warranty, but the price increases from the 10TB model to $533.

  • PancakePuppy
    "massive 256GB DRAM buffer" Minor typo, but that *would* be massive! :)
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    "How am I ever going to fill up hard drives this big?!" said everyone ever, six months before filling up colossal hard drive.
    Reply
  • mspencerl87
    That moment you 10TB hard drive looses 10 TB of data :O
    Reply
  • bloodroses
    19706774 said:
    That moment you 10TB hard drive looses 10 TB of data :O

    There goes someone's porn collection.... LOL

    I remember when my 2TB internal died along with my 2TB external shortly after and I lost a bunch of music, pictures and downloaded games on it. Not fun times. I can't imagine 10TB worth. :(
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    19706866 said:
    19706774 said:
    That moment you 10TB hard drive looses 10 TB of data :O

    There goes someone's porn collection.... LOL

    I remember when my 2TB internal died along with my 2TB external shortly after and I lost a bunch of music, pictures and downloaded games on it. Not fun times. I can't imagine 10TB worth. :(

    Yeah, that's why I always have to double the price tags I see when shopping for hard drives, because I always buy in pairs. One for use, one for backup.
    Reply
  • drtweak
    I remember when my dad got me a 40GB drive for my P4 14 years ago. I was all WHAT AM I GOING TO DO WITH THIS SPACE! Now i got 14 TB and i'm like I NEED MORE SPACE XD
    Reply
  • bloodroses
    19706992 said:
    19706866 said:
    19706774 said:
    That moment you 10TB hard drive looses 10 TB of data :O

    There goes someone's porn collection.... LOL

    I remember when my 2TB internal died along with my 2TB external shortly after and I lost a bunch of music, pictures and downloaded games on it. Not fun times. I can't imagine 10TB worth. :(

    Yeah, that's why I always have to double the price tags I see when shopping for hard drives, because I always buy in pairs. One for use, one for backup.

    I'd be careful with that as the two drives that I had die were of the identical model type; Seagate Barracuda 2TB 7200rpm. These are now notoriously known to have a high failure rate. Your best bet is to buy two different types of drives (one for use, one for backup) just in case there is a defect in the design of one of them. I have a Toshiba and a WD now in their place.
    Reply
  • Duncan70
    I can remember buying a WD Caviar 127Mb drive, yes thats MB.
    Reply
  • gggplaya
    19707188 said:
    19706992 said:
    19706866 said:
    19706774 said:
    That moment you 10TB hard drive looses 10 TB of data :O

    There goes someone's porn collection.... LOL

    I remember when my 2TB internal died along with my 2TB external shortly after and I lost a bunch of music, pictures and downloaded games on it. Not fun times. I can't imagine 10TB worth. :(

    Yeah, that's why I always have to double the price tags I see when shopping for hard drives, because I always buy in pairs. One for use, one for backup.

    I'd be careful with that as the two drives that I had die were of the identical model type; Seagate Barracuda 2TB 7200rpm. These are now notoriously known to have a high failure rate. Your best bet is to buy two different types of drives (one for use, one for backup) just in case there is a defect in the design of one of them. I have a Toshiba and a WD now in their place.


    Do people not realize that these are "NAS" drives, you're supposed to put them in RAID anyways. Sure you could use them in a single disk NAS configuration, but who does that?? With Raid 1 or 5, if you lose 1 drive, all your data is still retained. Just don't have the drives die at exactly the same time. My NAS will send me emails telling me that 1 drive has failed or is throwing errors, I can remotely log in from my smart phone and shut it down until I get a new drive.
    Reply
  • dark_lord69
    19708772 said:
    I can remember buying a WD Caviar 127Mb drive, yes thats MB.

    My dad's computer had a 200MB hard drive which was huge for the time. I remember seeing a tech show on TV talking about HDD's soon to get 1GB and 2GB of storage... I was amazed and couldn't imagine how someone could fill all that! LOL
    Fast forward several years...
    My first computer's HDD was a 40GB Maxtor back when 60GB was the biggest you could buy.
    Fast forward to today...
    My phone has 128GB! LOL
    (It's fairly amazing how far tech has come.)
    Reply