Skip to main content

The VR Releases Of (Early) Summer 2017

Operation Warcade VR

Operation Warcade VR is a throwback to the Operation Wolf and Operation Ghost arcade games from the 80s. It replicates the feel of those classic games by putting the gameplay on a virtual screen in front of you. The developer takes advantage of VR by allowing the game experience to extend beyond the virtual screen, into the 3D environment.

Operation Warcade VR features 108 missions and 36 levels to keep you coming back for more. You could also play classic mode, which features six levels and a final boss, just like the originals that inspired it.

  • Platforms: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift
  • Genre: Action, Shooter,
  • Input: Motion Controllers
  • Release Date: June 2, 2017
  • Publisher: Ivanovich
  • Developer: Ivanovich


MORE: Tom's Hardware's GDC 2017 Highlights


MORE: Best Virtual Reality HMDs

Streetball VR

Streetball VR lets you practice your b-ball skills in one of three street court locations while you listen to a soundtrack of 32 hip hop tunes. The games offers two modes, and Indicoe Games said it plans to offer more choices in the future. Practice mode lets you hone your talents until you’re ready to take on the real challenge. Time Mode puts your abilities to the test for leaderboard domination. The developer said that Streetball VR would eventually feature online multiplayer, too.

  • Platforms: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift
  • Genre: Sports, Simulation
  • Input: Motion Controllers
  • Release Date: June 2, 2017
  • Publisher: Indiecoe Games
  • Developer: Indiecode Games


MORE: Tom's Hardware's GDC 2017 Highlights


MORE: Best Virtual Reality HMDs

Untitled

Untitled challenges your puzzle-solving and logic skills. Bean Boy Games created a series of over 100 puzzles for you to solve. Each puzzle builds on the previous one, so what you learn as you progress through the game will come in handy when you attempt to solve harder puzzles later.

  • Platforms: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift
  • Genre: Puzzle
  • Input: Motion Controllers
  • Release Date: June 2, 2017
  • Publisher: Bean Boy Games
  • Developer: Bean Boy Games


MORE: Tom's Hardware's GDC 2017 Highlights


MORE: Best Virtual Reality HMDs

VR Sushi Bar

VR Sushi Bar is a fast-passed food preparation game. Customers place orders for food, and you must fulfill the ever-flowing requests without making a mistake. Should you fail, your clients will be outraged. Success doesn’t mean you can rest, though. Every time you pull off 10 combos in a row, you’ll awaken a Buddha statue that you must feed as quickly as possible. When the Buddha wants food, you fire sushi into his mouth with a sushi gun.

  • Platforms: HTC Vive
  • Genre: Casual, Simulation
  • Input: Motion Controllers
  • Release Date: June 4, 2017
  • Publisher: mikai Inc.
  • Developer: mikai Inc.


MORE: Tom's Hardware's GDC 2017 Highlights


MORE: Best Virtual Reality HMDs

The Existence Abstract

The Existence Abstract is a first-person shooter with roguelike elements. Every time you play The Existence Abstract, you’re in for a new experience. The map layouts are procedurally generated, so it's impossible to memorize your route. You have to rely on your intuition and instinct to find a safe path.

There are no extra lives and no continues in The Existence Abstract. When you die, your chance to finish the level you’re on drops to 0%.

  • Platforms: HTC Vive
  • Genre: Rogue-Like, Shooter
  • Input: Motion Controllers
  • Release Date: June 5, 2017
  • Publisher: Soukdee Games
  • Developer: Soukdee Games


MORE: Tom's Hardware's GDC 2017 Highlights


MORE: Best Virtual Reality HMDs

Lathe Safety Simulator

Who says you can’t learn something while you game? The team behind Lathe Safety Simulator certainly doesn’t believe that.

The developers stress that it isn’t a training application per se, but you will learn how to use a lathe while you play it. The game goes through all the safety procedures for using and maintaining a machine shop lathe. You’ll learn about the components of a lathe and how they work, and by the end of the game, you’ll be able to turn a component from a template.

If you plan to use a real lathe, make sure you take a proper safety course, but if you want to learn about them out of casual curiosity, Lathe Safety Simulator lets you play with heavy machinery without subjecting yourself to the danger of a real machine shop.

  • Platforms: HTC Vive
  • Genre: Simulation, Education
  • Input: Motion Controllers
  • Release Date: June 6, 2017
  • Publisher: Micheal Callaghan
  • Developer:Alexis Baron, Amelie Berthome, Alan Bourhis, KallanDautriche, Malo Hilliard, CorentinLheriaud, Bastien Ollivo, Arthur Pernot, Maxime Pointet, Fabien Quibreteau, ArliTuominen, ArttuTuovinen, Augusto Gómez Eguíluz, Niall McShane


MORE: Tom's Hardware's GDC 2017 Highlights


MORE: Best Virtual Reality HMDs

Special Delivery

Remember the Paperboy games from GameBoy, Nintendo NES, and Super NES consoles? Meerkat Gaming is bringing that concept to virtual reality with Special Delivery.

Ride your bike through a treacherous delivery route where myriad dangers lurk. You’ll have to avoid ravenous dogs, reckless drivers, and possibly a tornado or two to ensure that everyone on your route gets their morning paper.

  • Platforms: PlayStation VR
  • Genre: Action, Arcade
  • Input: Gamepad
  • Release Date: June 6, 2017
  • Publisher: Micheal Callaghan
  • Developer: Meerkat Gaming LLC


MORE: Tom's Hardware's GDC 2017 Highlights


MORE: Best Virtual Reality HMDs

Counter Fight: Samurai Edition

In Counter Fight: Samurai Edition, you are the chef at a Japanese rice bowl shop. You're in a race against the clock to prepare and serve the food that your customers order before they get upset.

Counter Fight’s menu features rice bowls with grilled fish, chicken with egg, and pork cutlet, and the game features realistic preparation and cooking methods for each dish.

There are two game modes: You can play a five-minute challenge round to see how many orders you can prepare in a short period or time, or you can try the endless challenge and see how long you can keep up with the ever-increasing volume of food orders.

  • Platforms: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift
  • Genre: Action, Simulation
  • Input: Motion Controllers
  • Release Date: June 7, 2017
  • Publisher: Tricol Co. LTD
  • Developer: Tricol Co., LTD.


MORE: Tom's Hardware's GDC 2017 Highlights


MORE: Best Virtual Reality HMDs

Airtone

Airtone is a virtual reality rhythm title. With the motion controllers, you trace the markers that are flying through the air towards you to gain points that let you unlock new songs and decorations for the game environment.

  • Platforms: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift
  • Genre: Rhythm
  • Input: Motion Controllers
  • Release Date: June 8, 2017
  • Publisher: Historia Inc.
  • Developer: AMG Games


MORE: Tom's Hardware's GDC 2017 Highlights


MORE: Best Virtual Reality HMDs

Caelum: Into the Sky Volume 1

Caelum is an early access VR adventure title that will eventually have six episodes. The initial release of the game offers players the chance to explore the first chapter while the developer continues work on the subsequent branches of the story.

You are an explorer who made a living by discovering hidden treasures and selling the unique wares you find. For your latest expedition, you’re in search of the Philosopher’s Stone–the holy grail of the mystical arts of alchemy–and your travels have led you to a secret laboratory that was once maintained by Giuseppe Francesco Borri, a famed philosopher from the 17th century. It’s believed that Borri discovered how to create a Philosopher’s Stone, and you’re here to find out.

  • Platforms: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift
  • Genre: Adventure
  • Input: Motion Controllers
  • Release Date: June 8, 2017
  • Publisher: Digital Realms, LTD.
  • Developer: Digital Realms, LTD.


MORE: Tom's Hardware's GDC 2017 Highlights


MORE: Best Virtual Reality HMDs

  • loki1944
    Holy crap. Pun intended.
    Reply
  • gdmaclew
    I agree. Most of those games look like they came straight out of the 80's. VR makers are going to have to do a lot better than this to have any hope of mass conversion.
    Reply
  • Ronnie Dean Davidson
    I would not spend $600 on a VR Headset to play 90% of these games !
    Reply
  • aquielisunari
    Just to be clear these offerings are among hundreds of others across many VR platforms. Think about "regular" gaming for a second. There are AAA titles and then there is the rest. I've been researching VR headsets and their games for months. Dead Effect 2 VR is one diamond in the rough. Fortunately the title is not Top 2017 VR releases. That would have been off the mark.
    Reply
  • vinay2070
    600$ for VR headset + Highend CPU + VR compatible GPU to play these games? I guess I will wait for another year at least.
    Reply
  • gergguy
    I'll bet all you people complaining have never even tried VR. Keep your trap shut unless you've experienced it. No words or video or whatever can't explain. You just have to experience it for yourself.
    Reply
  • vinay2070
    19893990 said:
    I'll bet all you people complaining have never even tried VR. Keep your trap shut unless you've experienced it. No words or video or whatever can't explain. You just have to experience it for yourself.

    Mostly with those kind of games? Even with VR! No Thanks! I can definitely wait another year.
    Reply
  • aquielisunari
    19894000 said:
    19893990 said:
    I'll bet all you people complaining have never even tried VR. Keep your trap shut unless you've experienced it. No words or video or whatever can't explain. You just have to experience it for yourself.

    Mostly with those kind of games? Even with VR! No Thanks! I can definitely wait another year.

    I have to wait another year till I've saved enough but I am going to buy one. And it's $800 for the Vive. You get everything for a roomscale VR experience. Literally walking through a VR game. Remember Space Invaders? That little ship at the bottom? Remove ship and insert you. Add multiple dimensions(3d instead of 1) and then insult VR. When they are spiraling out into the play area and then lining up and finally shooting at you, there is nothing a traditional PC can compare to and nothing a person can tell you that will adequately convey the immersion that you feel. Sure, many of us have gotten "lost" in a PC game. To be standing on Tatooine blocking incoming laser fire with a light saber(the Vive controller is convincing as a light saber handle) is something that will put a smile on your face. But what if you are legally blind? Video games have always been a little out of your element. The fine details can escape you unless you are so very close. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBMVZJLwgQo shows a wee bit of the impact VR can have. Check out HTC Vive or Oculus scare reactions or just reactions. It's like trying to explain the fourth dimension to someone or explaining trig to me.

    The games listed aren't something you can judge VR by. There are stores that have one of the many VR head sets out for demo sessions. There are also hundreds more. There are also simpler games that may look like they have been but in the headset?
    Reply