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Acer ConceptD CP7271K Review: A Do-Everything 4K Monitor

A 27-incher that checks off both professional creatives’ and gamers' boxes.

Acer ConceptD CP7271K
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Acer)

Rarely do we see the realm of high-end professional and gaming monitors merge into a single product,  but the Acer ConceptD CP7271K is that display. For pros, its spec sheet boasts terms like Adobe RGB and Pantone validation that carry a lot of credibility with those seeking tools for video post production and photo editing. Meanwhile, gamers get G-Sync Compatibility, a speedy refresh rate, plus extended color and HDR with a FALD backlight that can hit 1,000 nits. 

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The CP7271K conforms almost perfectly with the sRGB standard and delivers a tremendous color gamut across DCI-P3 and Adobe RGB in a level that surpasses the Acer Predator X27 gaming monitor that impressed us last year. With so much color available, it’s easy to apply the appropriate software lookup table for whatever graphics task you wish to perform. Only one monitor, the Asus ProArt PA32UCX mini-LED, can beat the CP7271K for Rec.2020 coverage. However, we had to dock the CP7271K for a lack of easily selectable color gamuts. 

Though priced more as professional monitor than a gaming one, the CP7271K is nonetheless a world-class gaming monitor as well, with HDR featuring more color than most know what to do with. Our gameplay experience was a mesmerizing one, thanks to phenomenal contrast and color saturation 

The CP7271K doesn’t come cheap, but if you’re looking for the ultimate in image quality with gaming performance to match, nothing else can touch it.

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  • tiggers97
    Wow. For a $2,199 MSRP (On "sale" at Amazon for $1664.98) I would expect it to do everything. Including having a warranty longer than 3 years.
    Reply
  • Kridian
    $1664.98 !?Muaaaahahahaaaaaaaa! They've lost their minds!
    Reply
  • CatalyticDragon
    $2200 is a lot of money for an 8-bit panel that doesn't support open variable refresh rate standards.
    Reply