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AMD Athlon 240GE and 220GE Review: Retaking the Low Ground

Editor's Choice

iGPU - 3DMark and Civilization VI

3DMark

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3DMark features a variety of tests that apply varying intensities to measure graphics performance. But while the results scale predictably, they aren't a measure of real-world gaming performance. With that said, the benchmark's DX11 and DX12 components do measure a CPU's ability to issue draw calls, sometimes on the order of millions per second. As such, these tests indicate a host processor's ability to push discrete graphics cards beyond the limitations of integrated graphics engines.

The Athlons trail Intel's processors during the DX12 tests. But remember they are also less expensive than the competition, which is currently selling at a premium or altogether unavailable due to Intel's ongoing shortage of 14nm chips.

The DX11 test paints a more encouraging picture, with the overclocked Athlon 240GE pulling off an upset against the G5600 and G5400. We encountered the same 3.9 GHz ceiling with all three Athlon processors. Given their identical on-die resources, you can expect similar performance from the lesser models after tuning.

Civilization VI Graphics Test

It's clear that the Ryzen 3 2200G is in a class of its own thanks to eight CUs cranking away at 1,100 MHz. But we can also see that the Athlon processors are far more powerful than the Pentiums.

Differences between the three Athlon models are slight at stock settings, despite the 100 to 300 MHz clock rate delta separating them.

We see a much sharper decline in performance from the Pentium G5600 to G5400. That's attributable to their different integrated graphics units. The G5600 includes Intel's UHD Graphics 630 with 24 execution units in a GT2 configuration, while the G5400 comes with the UHD Graphics 610 engine with 12 EUs in a GT1 arrangement.

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