Skip to main content

Corsair RM750i Power Supply Review

Corsair is revamping its RM line, adding the letter "i" to highlight a more advanced digital interface — today we check out the RM750i.

Transient Response Tests

Advanced Transient Response Tests

For details on our transient response testing, please click here.

In these tests, we monitored the response of the PSU in two different scenarios. First, a transient load (10A at +12V, 5A at 5V, 5A at 3.3V and 0.5A at 5VSB) was applied to the PSU for 200 ms while the PSU was working at 20-percent load. In the second scenario, the PSU was hit by the same transient load while operating at 50-percent load. In both tests, we used our oscilloscope to measure the voltage drops caused by the transient load. The voltages should have remained within the ATX specification's regulation limits.

These tests are crucial because they simulate the transient loads a PSU is likely to handle (such as booting a RAID array, an instant 100-percent load of CPU/GPUs, etc.). We call these tests "Advanced Transient Response Tests," and they are designed to be very tough to master, especially for a PSU with a capacity of less than 500W.  

Advanced Transient Response At 20 Percent

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.087V12.021V0.55%Pass
5V4.999V4.940V1.18%Pass
3.3V3.331V3.238V2.79%Pass
5VSB4.977V4.945V0.64%Pass

Advanced Transient Response At 50 Percent

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.041V11.973V0.56%Pass
5V4.992V4.935V1.14%Pass
3.3V3.325V3.232V2.80%Pass
5VSB4.961V4.919V0.85%Pass
Image 1 of 5

Image 2 of 5

Image 3 of 5

Image 4 of 5

Image 5 of 5

The performance of the RM750i during our Advanced Transient Response Tests was superb. This platform can easily handle any transient load you'll throw at it, and on the +12V rail, the voltage drop was very low in both cases. Even the 3.3V rail managed to stay within 3 percent, registering a very good performance compared to the competition.

Here are the oscilloscope screenshots we took during Advanced Transient Response Testing:

Transient Response At 20 Percent Load

Image 1 of 4

Image 2 of 4

Image 3 of 4

Image 4 of 4

Transient Response At 50 Percent Load

Turn-On Transient Tests

In the next set of tests, we measured the response of the PSU in simpler transient load scenarios during the PSU's power-on phase.

For the first measurement, we turned off the PSU, dialed in the maximum current the 5VSB could output and switched on the PSU. In the second test, we dialed the maximum load the +12V could handle and started the PSU while it was in standby mode. In the last test, while the PSU was completely switched off (we cut off the power or switched off the PSU by flipping its on/off switch), we dialed the maximum load the +12V rail could handle before switching on the PSU from the loader and restoring the power. The ATX specification states that recorded spikes on all rails should not exceed 10 percent of their nominal values (+10 percent for 12V is 13.2V, and 5.5V for 5V).    

Image 1 of 3

Image 2 of 3

Image 3 of 3

We noticed a tiny voltage overshoot at 5VSB and a small wave in the waveform during the last test. That's certainly not perfect performance, but it's still good enough for a high-end PSU, as there weren't any high- or medium-voltage overshoots or spikes. 

  • JQB45
    Nice to see quality improving some.
    Reply
  • Luay
    Aris

    Thanks for the thorough review.

    The RM750i does beat the G2 750 at $10 more, which is a good trade for a mpore quite operation, and is $20 cheaper than the Snow Silent 750, but how does it compare to the $10 more expensive P2 750?
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    I am sorry but I haven't reviewed the P2 750 model yet. However since it is Platinum it should be compared with the HX750i.
    Reply
  • jonnyguru
    Unless efficiency isn't that important to you.
    Reply
  • Luay
    No I'm comparing it based on price.

    Since the gold rated RM750i and the platinum P2 750 are $10 apart, excluding the rebate, and as Jonny (The Jonny??) said, a few %s of efficiency isn't as important to me as something as tangible as emitting noise.
    Reply
  • Dan414
    This seems like the droids/PSU I've been looking for. That or maybe the 850i. Also, I like the white lettering - that way it will match my case no matter what lighting I have inside.
    Reply
  • synphul
    I'm confused, there's no other product that compares to the corsair rm750i except the evga g2 750 and the seasonic snow silent 750 which is a higher category and price. Yet isn't that the ss-750km3 sitting at $10 cheaper?

    Cwt may be improving but it's not ss quality. Hard to face the two off when they're so close in price or the seasonic is cheaper. I fail to see how it's a better option than the competition. A better option than their own lineup maybe, but that's not saying a ton.

    I suppose it's true it comes with corsair link, though with psu's already this quiet not sure the need is there to control the fan beyond active variable control built in and silent mode at low draw. I've never needed to monitor my psu temp or control the fan speed even on a plain old active fan design. Comes off as a bit gimmicky to try and create added value. Don't get me wrong, this would be nice on an otherwise loud psu with no fan control and no silent operation mode at all but in the face of being quiet and having variable/silent fan operation it's a little redundant.

    Idk, like I said it's nice to see they're trying to improve quality in some areas but they don't even come in under the competition. As of right now they're more expensive than the competition. Personally I'll stick with seasonic.
    Reply
  • trifler
    If any PSU companies read this, I want to see molex discontinued, at least on the non-modular power supplies. At least offer some power supplies that don't have molex.
    Reply
  • fil1p
    It's good to see that all the caps a Japanese on this one. I like Corsair PSUs, but the last gen RM series had some lower quality caps in there, which quite frankly shouldn't have been in an enthusiast PSU at that price point in the first place.
    Reply
  • jonnyguru
    16336613 said:
    Cwt may be improving but it's not ss quality.

    How do you know? ;-)

    16336613 said:
    I suppose it's true it comes with corsair link, though with psu's already this quiet not sure the need is there to control the fan beyond active variable control built in and silent mode at low draw. I've never needed to monitor my psu temp or control the fan speed even on a plain old active fan design.

    You can also monitor voltages and load and calculate efficiency. So it does a lot more than what you're stating.
    Reply