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Dell P2714T 27-Inch Touchscreen Monitor, Reviewed

Dell P2714T: A 27-Inch IPS-Based Touchscreen Monitor

With the launch of Windows 8 in 2012, Microsoft made touchscreen computing on the desktop mainstream. The Windows 8 interface attempted to bridge the gap between phones, tablets, and PCs by providing the same multi-touch experience first marketed by Apple in the original iPhone.

While touchscreen monitors are nothing new, they never had a reason to become more prevalent until Windows 8 hit the streets. Before that, only specific commercial applications and interactive displays used the technology. While Microsoft’s shiny new OS doesn’t require a touchscreen, its default layout certainly begs for one. Most power users continue to eschew the Windows 8 UI in favor of a traditional desktop. But for the folks willing to give it a shot, multi-touch displays offer a new way to interact with your computer.

To that end, Dell recently released its P2714T. This is a 27-inch PLS screen with a maximum resolution of 1920x1080. For now, the number of multi-touch-compatible monitors at this size is small, and there are none that we know of offering higher than FHD resolution. If you want the pixel density of a QHD screen, you're out of luck at the moment.

BrandDell
ModelP2714T
MSRP$700
Panel TypePLS
BacklightW-LED, edge array
Screen Size27-inch
Touch PanelProjected capacitive10-point multi-touch
Touch Resolution32,767x32,767
Max Resolution1920x1080
Max Refresh Rate60 Hz
Aspect Ratio16:9
Response Time (GTG)8 ms
Brightness270 cd/m2
Speakers-
VGA1
DVI-
DisplayPort1
HDMI2 w/MHL
Audio1 out (1/8" mini-plug)
USB 3.01 up, 2 down
USB 2.02 down
Panel DimensionsW x H x D26.2 x 18.7 x 3.1 in665 x 476 x 80 mm
Panel Thickness1.7 in / 44 mm
Weight20.66 lbs / 9.39 kg
WarrantyThree years

Seven hundred dollars sounds downright expensive for a 27-inch FHD screen, regardless of its performance. But the addition of a large touch-sensitive layer is not without cost. The output position resolution is even finer than that of the LCD panel behind. This makes for an extremely precise response to user input.

The technology is the same as you’d find on an iPad. A layer of electrodes is etched onto the front glass panel. Then, current is applied to create an electrical field. When a conductive object comes in contact with the field, the change in voltage is measured and translated into an input signal.

A 10-point touchscreen adds additional gestures beyond the actions you might be most familiar with. You can use multiple fingers to pinch in and out, double- and triple-tap, flick at varying speeds, and other combinations. Each is interpreted differently and translated into on-screen motion. How that appears depends on the operating system you're using. The two most common touch-enabled OSes are iOS and Windows 8, and they both employ similar gestures.

  • killerclick
    Lol touchscreens on the desktop, it was a crappy idea 2 years ago and it's a crappy idea now.
    Reply
  • damianrobertjones
    @killerclick: That, of course, is YOUR opinion. I'd rather have the option than not have the option. Maybe we should just stop providing options... ."Having to lift your hand from the keyboard to reach out and touch your monitor definitely takes more time."So does moving your hand from the mouse back to the keyboard. As it stands I do actually prefer having touch.
    Reply
  • damianrobertjones
    @killerclick: That, of course, is YOUR opinion. I'd rather have the option than not have the option. Maybe we should just stop providing options... ."Having to lift your hand from the keyboard to reach out and touch your monitor definitely takes more time."So does moving your hand from the mouse back to the keyboard. As it stands I do actually prefer having touch.
    Reply
  • vaughn2k
    good to have this on kiosk, than have it used by designers like me.. ;)
    Reply
  • therogerwilco
    Don't talk to me about desktop monitors unless they have better resolutions than 1600p.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    @damian: having options may be nice but touch-screen on the desktop for everyday computing and productivity with touch as the primary input sounds like a horrible ergonomic disaster: to use a large touch screen, you need to bring it close to your waist to avoid excessive strain on your arms but putting the display there means having to hold your head at ridiculous angles to look at the screen which is going to strain your neck.So, touch on a large screen only makes sense for occasional/intermittent use.
    Reply
  • killerclick
    12389025 said:
    @killerclick: That, of course, is YOUR opinion. I'd rather have the option than not have the option. Maybe we should just stop providing options...

    I said it's a crappy idea that's not going to catch on, and I'd prefer not to have to pay extra for it or sacrifice other aspects of the display, like resolution in this case. That said, the companies can put their R&D and marketing $ wherever they want, not my money, but it's still dumb.
    Reply
  • Patrick Tobin
    After having used touch extensively on desktop, laptop and tablet form factors I have to say it works really well for a desktop system for quick hits and the such and getting in and out of stuff quickly in Windows 8, on a laptop it makes very little sense though. I would rather have it than not, but not at 1920x1080.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    The childrens that are now using iDevices and similar can not live with traditional display if there are these in the market. In the long run non touchable monitors are gonna die out. Sooner or later there are more of those touch orientated customer than we old fossilised normal screen users... Eventually we die out and so will normal monitors. For me touch based pad with screen would be ideal for controlling win8 in my desktop. It would be on the table just like my mouse, so I don't have ro rise my hand to do something...In few years there will be a lot of 4K monitors with touch interface, because big audience have to have them...
    Reply
  • Patrick Tobin
    After having used touch extensively on desktop, laptop and tablet form factors I have to say it works really well for a desktop system for quick hits and the such and getting in and out of stuff quickly in Windows 8, on a laptop it makes very little sense though. I would rather have it than not, but not at 1920x1080.
    Reply