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Is That A Notebook? MALIBAL's Six-Core, Dual-GPU, Speed Demon

MALIBAL Nine X7200 Features

One might have expected a machine with such powerful hardware to require an oversized chassis and wider screen, but Clevo managed to pack everything into a 17.3” form factor. Flogged as “THD” (for True HD)--as if that were an improvement over the older 1920x1200 resolution--LED-backlighting is the true advancement of its 1920x1080 panel.

The base includes a fingerprint scanner to allow biometric login, while the raised-bezel top adds a three-megapixel camera.

Audio jacks, a trio of USB 2.0 ports, and a Kensington Lock hole occupy the right side of the X7200 chassis.

The real business happens on the left, where a DVI-I, RJ45 network, HDMI-out, two USB 3.0, and eSATA 3Gb/s ports are found. The antenna jack supports an optional tuner card, while the IEEE-1394 jack supports an optional FireWire module, not included in this installation.

MALIBAL also didn’t add the HDMI-in feature, which adds video pass-through for the 1080p panel, but the 9-in-1 memory card interface is standard. Below those, a 6x Blu-ray Disk reader, 8x DVD writer combo drive addresses most optical media needs.

The X7200 front panel is fairly clean, having only vents and indicator lights, while the back panel centers a power connection between its exhaust grilles.

Standard for the X7200 is the carrying bag, a power brick, an owner’s manual, and a cleaning cloth. MALIBAL adds the software, depending on hardware configuration, and left-over thermal compound from its $40 IC Diamond 7 installation option.

Thomas Soderstrom
Thomas Soderstrom is a Senior Staff Editor at Tom's Hardware US. He tests and reviews cases, cooling, memory and motherboards.
  • Darkerson
    Dear god, that thing is a beast...
    Reply
  • compton
    I'm not sure how awesome this is in practice. I'm sure someone out othere needs this, but that person would have to be blind to appreciate the asthetics.
    Reply
  • iam2thecrowe
    its more of a portable pc than a notebook. look at the power consumption. Even its own power adaptor cant keep up at max load.
    Reply
  • Darkerson
    In this case, its not really about looks, as much as its about "portable" brute strength. And it seems to have plenty of that...
    Reply
  • bombat1994
    this is why we cant have nice things,

    but seriously, the 480m is just a small 450
    Reply
  • thats actually really good performance from a top end system
    at most rates it is still fairly close to a desktop in price also
    Reply
  • maxiim
    This quite useless if you want all that power for gaming, you surely cant have it on the go with a battery provided....might as well build a with almost the same specs for less money.
    Reply
  • compton
    Its the same price as a base model Kia Rio just about. Kudos to them for the engineering needed to make this gear work in a mobile chassis. I may not be sold on the concept, or see the need of, but I hope they sell a ton of them. It is kinda cool just because its so powerful -- but for the price you could build or buy two highly specialized systems. It could be a mobile workstation or for AV production work on site instead of just for gaming. Clearly these ultra powerful 'notebooks' are a niche segment, but there are quite a few now. Someone must be buying them.
    Reply
  • sudeshc
    Not that impressive to me main reason for Lappy is portability and thats where this lacks i wounder even if under no load how much heat it would generate and also the battery wont last long..
    Reply
  • Crashman
    comptonIt could be a mobile workstation or for AV production work on site instead of just for gaming. Clearly these ultra powerful 'notebooks' are a niche segment, but there are quite a few now. Someone must be buying them.Actually, that's what the X7200 is! Tom's Hardware got the "gaming" version simply to show off its capabilities to enthusiasts, but the Quadro versions are equally viable (and likely more valuable) in their own respective markets.
    Reply