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Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Founders Edition Review: A Titan V Killer

Editor's Choice

High Dynamic Range: Improving Performance and Input Latency

Nvidia’s previous-generation Pascal architecture needed to do some processing on high dynamic range content moving through its pipeline, resulting in a quantifiable performance hit with HDR enabled. Turing incorporates support for this processing and tone mapping natively in the pipeline. The implication, of course, is that GeForce RTX-class cards don’t incur the same penalty.

To test this theory, we forced our Acer Predator X27 to 60 Hz and set Windows to run at 10-bit RGB output (confirmed through the display’s OSD).

Battlefield 1

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Interestingly, turning on HDR10 in Battlefield 1 eliminated a lot of the stuttering we’re used to seeing at the beginning of our benchmark run. As a result, all three cards demonstrate a higher 99th percentile frame rate in HDR mode than when they’re in RGB-SDR.

This also helps push average performance up a bit on the GeForce RTX cards. The GeForce GTX 1080 Ti benefits as well. However, because its frame rate in HDR mode is lower through most of the test (as evidenced by the gold line in our percentile chart), average performance lags the SDR result slightly.

Destiny 2

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In the case of GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, GeForce RTX 2080, and GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, using HDR exacts a notable slow-down in Destiny 2. With the featured turned on, all three cards range between 93% and 94% of the frame rates we measured in SDR mode.

Far Cry 5

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The hit isn’t as severe in Far Cry 5, though both GeForce RTX cards are affected slightly.

Forza Motorsport 7

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Minor performance impacts on the GeForce RTX cards contrast sharply with what happens to GeForce GTX 1080 Ti when you turn on HDR in Forza Motorsport 7.

The influence of HDR affects each of these games differently. Battlefield 1 and Far Cry 5 are great showcases of brighter whites (at least in our outdoor benchmark scenarios), while Destiny 2’s intro scene exhibited notably more depth in its contrast between fire and shadow. Regardless of whether Turing handles HDR content better than Pascal, don’t underestimate the experiential difference high dynamic range has on gaming (this applies to you too, Radeon owners).

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  • A Stoner
    Conclusion, let them hold onto these card until they can lower the price to about $700
    Reply
  • JimmiG
    Waste of time to write a review. "Just buy it".
    Reply
  • pontiac1979
    "Waste of time to write a review. "Just buy it"."

    Oh yeah, god forbid Tom's does an in-depth review of the latest and greatest. Keyword greatest. If you desire 4K gaming and have the funds available, why wouldn't you?
    Reply
  • max0x7ba
    Quit benchmarking Battlefield with DX12, it is unplayable.
    Reply
  • ubercake
    I'm probably going to buy one... Though it's not my fault... I feel like the Russians are compelling me to do this by way of Facebook. I'm a victim in this whole Nvidia marketing scam. Don't judge.

    That being said, I like high-quality, high-speed graphics performance. This may also be influencing my decision.

    Great review!
    Reply
  • AnimeMania
    How much of the performance increase is due to using GDDR6 memory? I know this makes the cards perform better the higher the resolution is, how does it effect other aspects of the video cards.
    Reply
  • teknobug
    "Just buy it" they said...

    If you're in Canada, you might not want to pay the price of these.
    Reply
  • chaosmassive
    While I appreciate this very detailed and nicely written review, its kinda redundant
    because I think Avram has already reviewed this card with his opinion on late august
    with the conclusion was "just buy it"
    Reply
  • uglyduckling81
    JUST BUY IT!!!
    Reply
  • wiyosaya
    SMH I don't understand the reasoning for comparing a $3k known non-gaming card with a $1.2k gaming card. Are there really gamers our there ignorant enough, other than those with deep pockets who want bragging rights, to purchase the $3K card for gaming when they know it is not meant for gaming? Or is this to differentiate Tom's from the other tech sites in order to inspire confidence in Tom's readers?

    Personally, I would have rather seen the 2080 Ti compared against 1080 Ti even if it Tom's comes to the same conclusions as the other tech web sites.

    The comparison in this article does not make me want to rush out and buy it because it is $1.8k cheaper than a non-gaming card. I really hate to say it, but with the premise of this review being somewhat along the lines of "lookie hereee kiddies. Heree's a gaming card for $1.2k that beets a $3k non-gaming card" turned this review into a TL;DR review for me.
    Reply