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Razer Tomahawk ATX Review: Razer Invader

A single 120mm fan in a $200 chassis isn’t going to cut it.

Razer Tomahawk ATX
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

We are using the following system for our case test bed:

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Razer Tomahawk ATX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Razer Tomahawk ATX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Razer Tomahawk ATX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Razer Tomahawk ATX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

After stripping the case down, we installed the motherboard, GPU and power supply into it. Being a big case, that all went without issue. The only complaint I have here is that the motherboard standoffs didn’t seem to line up with our board nicely, though that could be down to the integrated IO shield used on our Asus board.

Cable Management

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Razer Tomahawk ATX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Razer Tomahawk ATX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Razer Tomahawk ATX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

When it comes to cable management, the Tomahawk ATX offers a pleasantly smooth experience. The cable shield in the motherboard area is roomy enough to allow big connectors through without finicking, and on the other side of the case there’s plenty of space for cable slack. The PSU shroud also has roomy cutouts to deal with otherwise tricky connector placements.

Three Velcro straps make easy work of guiding the cables along the tidy way, and when all is done, two covers are helpful for covering up all the cable mess. We would have liked to see a cover for the cables at the PSU area, but the glass is so tinted you can’t really see the slack anyway.

Razer Tomahawk ATX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Build Complete

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Razer Tomahawk ATX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Razer Tomahawk ATX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Razer Tomahawk ATX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The case comes with two bits of lighting: the Razer logo, which is backlit by a white LED but shines green through the logo, and Chroma underglow. This underglow comprises two D-RGB strips, one on each side of the case, that have a diffuser to create a very smooth lighting effect underneath the chassis. On photo it looks a little blown out, but off-camera it’s pleasant light that’s easy on the eyes.

Because our Asus motherboard keeps the internal USB headers powered on, the lighting, at least on the Razer Logo, also stayed on when the system is switched off -- not exactly useful for knowing whether the system is on, but it doesn make a statement.

  • Loadedaxe
    NZXT in disguise. Pay $130 for Razer logo?

    Get a H510 for $69, better money spent.
    Reply
  • mrv_co
    TLDNR: In Razer World, Logo trumps Logos.
    Reply
  • gg83
    This case makes no sense! Is it meant for liquid cooled cpu and videocard?
    Reply
  • g-unit1111
    As Edna Krabappel would say - "pretty lame, Milhouse".
    Reply
  • Makaveli
    Loadedaxe said:
    NZXT in disguise. Pay $130 for Razer logo?

    Get a H510 for $69, better money spent.

    I guess you never got the memo.

    Razer logo + RGB = more fps.
    Reply
  • woot
    g-unit1111 said:
    As Edna Krabappel would say - "pretty lame, Milhouse".
    Krabappel? this whole time i though it was crandall
    Reply
  • Loadedaxe
    Makaveli said:
    I guess you never got the memo.

    Razer logo + RGB = more fps.
    Ohell then, I am definately getting one!
    Reply
  • nitrium
    The old NZXT S340 Razer case was a lot better, and looks almost identical:
    https://www2.razer.com/ap-en/gaming-systems-old/s340The S340 was probably a better foundation case too(?).
    Reply
  • Mr5oh
    gg83 said:
    This case makes no sense! Is it meant for liquid cooled cpu and videocard?

    Well can't have too high of expectations from a case that puts glass on both sides of the case.... The back side of the motherboard tray, even on "cable managed" cases is not exactly "show worthy". For a lot of people's cases, it's a mess, and it's hard to get the panel back on.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    I feel the 3 stars rating is probably too optimistic for this casing. In my opinion, if the casing cannot provide decent cooling to the system, it is a clear cut fail to me. The moment I see the solid front panel, I am already expecting poor thermals in there. To me,
    Great looking case, good sound isolation, poor airflow (thermals) - This is an instant fail
    Great airflow, bad sound isolation and average looks - This is still more acceptable than 1
    Great airflow, decent sound isolation and looks good - This is the toughest to balance and probably worth the higher scores. Sound isolation can only be decent in an airflow case unless they provide very low RPM fans.
    I feel a lot of companies want to get into the casing business, but just buying an off the shelf design will not cut it. One can water cool it, but the radiator will still need good airflow to run cool after some time. So there is no excuse for poor airflow in a case that cost this much.
    Reply