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Chinese Xindong Fenghua GPU with GDDR6X Takes on AMD and Nvidia

Xindong Technology
(Image credit: Xindong Technology )

After the fall of Matrox Graphics, S3 Graphics, and XGI in the mid-2000s, no companies have competently challenged AMD and Nvidia in the field of discrete graphics cards for PCs. But with the rise of special-purpose-datacenter GPUs, mining GPUs, and gaming, numerous rivals for the two mighty GPU designers emerged. For example, this week Chinese company Xindong Technology announced its Fenghua GPU aimed at gaming PCs and datacenters. 

Xindong may not be a household name, but it seems to be a very ambitious GPU developer from China that wants to compete against considerably bigger players. The company recently successfully tested its first Fenghua No. 1 graphics processing unit developed entirely in-house and then designed by Innosilicon, a contract chip designer. 

The Fenghua No. 1 seems to be a multi-chiplet GPU with a GDDR6X-based memory subsystem that supports all modern (and legacy) application programming interfaces for graphics and compute, including DirectX, Vulkan, OpenGL, OpenCL, and even OpenGL ES. It can also work with Android, Linux, and Windows. The chip uses a PCIe Gen4 interface to connect to the host and can output graphics using DisplayPort, eDP 1.4, and HDMI 2.1 interfaces, just like today's best graphics cards

Xindong yet has to disclose performance levels one can expect from its GPU, but it says it plans to use its GPU for desktops, cloud games, cloud mobile games, Xinchuang desktop, and workstations. This positioning seems very self-confident since it is relatively easy to make GPUs process select workloads in the datacenter. Still, it is much harder to make them work flawlessly across dozens of games and applications used by gamers at home.  

Furthermore, multi-GPU rendering (which is probably what Xingdong means by implementing a multi-chiplet GPU) is very tricky with today's games and rendering techniques. Neither AMD nor Nvidia support CrossFireX and SLI technologies on their most recent gaming GPUs. 

At present, we have no idea whether Xindong's Fenghua GPU will be a viable competitor for AMD's Radeon and Nvidia's GeForce. Still, at least there is one more rival (in addition to Intel, Phytium, Zhaoxin, and a number of others that design datacenter and HPC GPUs) for these two graphics giants.

It is important to note that the Fenghua No. 1 is far from the first custom GPU designed by contract chip developer Innosilicon. Last year the company demonstrated a datacenter GPU, and we also know that the company has some Ethereum accelerators

  • samopa
    Give me DirectX (11 and 12) compatibility, $300 price tag, 80% of GTX3080 performance, and I'm in, don't care who makes it.
    Reply
  • TheOtherOne
    I will give it a shot if/when it's available!

    More competition is ALWAYS good for consumers, not to mention majority of PC gamers are casuals and currently because of "duopoly" of nVidia and AMD, consumers don't really have much of a choice but to pay at least 30% increased RETAIL prices with every gen even for low/mid range cards. And with all the mining BS, it's almost impossible to get a card even at double the retail price.
    Reply
  • renz496
    samopa said:
    Give me DirectX (11 and 12) compatibility, $300 price tag, 80% of GTX3080 performance, and I'm in, don't care who makes it.

    sorry miner first.

    TheOtherOne said:
    because of "duopoly" of nVidia and AMD, consumers don't really have much of a choice

    consumer also did not allow for third competitor to exist. else we will not in duopoly situation right now. there are several company competing in graphic accelerator market back in the 90s.
    Reply
  • spentshells
    It'll be cool to see a new competitor, but multi GPU sounds like a downfall. Even still, hardware acceleration in some software as well as in data centers, this could be good news.... But if ya wanna be a world wide respected company, I hate to break it to you and your marketing team, but ya can't have the word dong anywhere in the name of your product, You just can't trust me on this. I'm not even trying to be funny here.
    Reply
  • LuxZg
    If they make it run 1080p games at respectable levels like 1070 or 5600XT, doesn't suck 600W, and costs under 300$ it would sell like crazy (249$ would be a bomb). That's where mass market is. Well, IMHO...
    Reply
  • ddcservices
    samopa said:
    Give me DirectX (11 and 12) compatibility, $300 price tag, 80% of GTX3080 performance, and I'm in, don't care who makes it.

    The Trump(and now Biden) tariffs add 23% to the price of anything that will be shipped from China. There is also the issue that not enough people talk about, the difference between GPU price and video card price, then the difference between the price the video card maker charges, and what the DISTRIBUTORS then charge retailers. The video card could be $300 from the video card maker, and then the distributor charges $800 to get the card from China to whatever country the destination is. The retailer now ends up charging $1000 for a card that only generates $300 to the video card maker, and the GPU maker is getting what, $50 for the GPU chip itself?
    Reply
  • ddcservices
    TheOtherOne said:
    I will give it a shot if/when it's available!

    More competition is ALWAYS good for consumers, not to mention majority of PC gamers are casuals and currently because of "duopoly" of nVidia and AMD, consumers don't really have much of a choice but to pay at least 30% increased RETAIL prices with every gen even for low/mid range cards. And with all the mining BS, it's almost impossible to get a card even at double the retail price.

    You may not remember the AMD K5, which had compatibility problems, and other chips that were out there that weren't fully compatible. If the chip runs slow, but also doesn't handle DirectX 11, 12, and Vulkan decently, then it won't do well worldwide.
    Reply