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FSP Offers 2000W Power Supply For Upcoming Nvidia, AMD GPUs

Cannon Pro 2000W
Cannon Pro 2000W (Image credit: FSP)

FSP has launched the the Cannon Pro 2000W, a PSU meant to feed Nvidia and AMD's next-generation products that will vie for a spot on the list of best graphics cards. The new power supply is already available on Amazon for $499.99.

Initially tailored to cryptocurrency miners, FSP's Cannon Pro 2000W offers 18 6+2-pin PCIe power connectors. FSP is promising stable, simultaneous operation for a maximum of nine graphics cards. However, now that modern graphics cards, such as the GeForce RTX 3090 Ti (Ampere) with its rumored 450W TDP are consuming more power, the Cannon Pro 2000W could serve a higher purpose. Although the power supply doesn't have any 12VHPWR power connectors, there are more than enough regular PCIe power connectors for those 3x8-pin to 12VHPWR power adapters.

The Cannon Pro 2000W clings to the standard ATX form factor with dimensions of 200 x 150 x 86mm. The power supply features the 80 Plus Gold certification, ensuring 87% efficiency at 100% load, 90% efficiency at 50% load, and 87% efficiency at 20% load. The Cannon Pro 2000W utilizes a single rail design and delivers up to 2000W with a small caveat. The unit tops out at 1200W with a 100V - 115V input and 1500W with a 115V to 200V input. Therefore, to exploit the power supply's maximum 2000W capacity, you need a 200V to 240V input.

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Cannon Pro 2000W

Cannon Pro 2000W (Image credit: FSP)
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Cannon Pro 2000W

Cannon Pro 2000W (Image credit: FSP)

As you would expect from any high-end power supply, the Cannon Pro 2000W boasts a DC to DC module design, Active PFC ≧ 0.9, quality Japanese electrolytic capacitors, and your usual cocktail of protections, including OVP, OCP, UVP, SCP, OPP, and OTP. As a result, FSP rates the Cannon Pro 2000W for 92% efficiency at a typical load and hold up time more than 17ms at full load.

The Cannon Pro 2000W depends on a 135mm dual-ball bearing fan for active cooling. It also utilizes an entirely modular design, so consumers only need to plug in the cables they need, which helps ease installation and cable management and improve cooling performance.

FSP doesn't specify the warranty period for the Cannon Pro 2000W on the power supply's product page.

Zhiye Liu
Zhiye Liu

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

  • mac_angel
    Yea, I was about to comment that most homes in North America can't support that. Sadly, the way most homes are built, they can't even support 2 gaming computers in the bedrooms running at the same time.
    Reply
  • Murissokah
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    mac_angel said:
    Yea, I was about to comment that most homes in North America can't support that. Sadly, the way most homes are built, they can't even support 2 gaming computers in the bedrooms running at the same time.
    240V circuits can be created in North American homes. You usually find these for high powered appliances or electric vehicle chargers.
    Reply
  • Neilbob
    2 kilowatts seems to be pushing it slightly. Even with the most powerful CPUs and GPUs, I can't see how any consumer can even come close to that level of usage, outside of the most outlandish (and cough pointless) overclocking scenarios.
    Reply
  • salgado18
    Murissokah said:
    i9-12900KS with RTX 3090ti should saturate it with a mild overclock.

    Jokes aside, this thing could power three full systems if it had the connections. I bet sales were hit by crypto slowing down, and now they want to sell it to whoever wants the absolute best of the best.
    Reply
  • Krotow
    These PSU must come with built in water cooler and water inlet and outlet pipes. For use in home heating assembly. And probably entire PC must be built in this way.
    Reply
  • Murissokah
    salgado18 said:
    i9-12900KS with RTX 3090ti should saturate it with a mild overclock.

    Jokes aside, this thing could power three full systems if it had the connections. I bet sales were hit by crypto slowing down, and now they want to sell it to whoever wants the absolute best of the best.

    I guess it's for people with more money than sense. Because if you have both you'll know a PSU this oversized is not a good thing (efficiency will suffer because you'll be running at under 10% load when browsing or doing general desktop activities, which is most of the time for most people).
    Reply
  • mac_angel
    hotaru.hino said:
    240V circuits can be created in North American homes. You usually find these for high powered appliances or electric vehicle chargers.
    "can be created". But my comment was that most homes in North America cannot support it. Most homes, especially the ones built in the past 15 years or so, have the bedrooms all sharing a single 15amp breaker, and the lights on a separate breaker. Something I've had problems with in the past because it meant that my son and I couldn't be gaming on our computers at the same time without tripping the breaker.
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    mac_angel said:
    "can be created". But my comment was that most homes in North America cannot support it. Most homes, especially the ones built in the past 15 years or so, have the bedrooms all sharing a single 15amp breaker, and the lights on a separate breaker. Something I've had problems with in the past because it meant that my son and I couldn't be gaming on our computers at the same time without tripping the breaker.
    Which can be fixed if you really wanted to. Saying "cannot support it" to me also implies that the home taps off from a single phase, but I'm pretty sure most urban/suburban North American homes use two phases.

    It can be done. Maybe not with the current wiring situation in a given home, but it can be done.
    Reply
  • Ogotai
    hotaru.hino said:
    240V circuits can be created in North American homes

    you seem to be forgetting one important detail. north American homes, run on 120v, less a few major appliances, aka stove and clothes dryer, not 240v. so that would mean the things that dont auto adjust for the voltage change, would be fried if plugged into a 240v socket.
    Reply