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Gigabyte Outs RTX 2080 Super With Liquid Cooling Block

(Image credit: Gigabyte)

Many of us love a custom loop. But when it comes to simplicity, we’re happy when we see manufacturers unveil graphics cards that come with a water block installed from the factory, just like the Gigabyte RTX 2080 Super Gaming OC WaterForce announced today. 

(Image credit: Gigabyte)

The liquid cooling block that comes on the new Gigabyte card features a totally different design than you would get from a specialist water cooling manufacturer, clearly being styled far more to Gigabyte’s image than the basic designs we’ve come to expect from the specialists. We have to say, Gigabyte's offering looks pretty stylish, especially with how the RGB lighting is implemented.

The block cools the GPU, memory and VRM circuitry. It comes with standard G1/4” threads for fittings, so it should slot right into your custom loop without any issues.

As far as specifications go, the GPU aboard is clocked at 1,845 MHz, which is just 30 MHz above the reference specification. The 8GB of GDDR6 memory runs at 15.5 GHz. For VRM circuitry, Gigabyte equipped the card with 12+2 phase power delivery, which when paired with a great liquid loop should provide ample stability and overclocking headroom.

(Image credit: Gigabyte)

Do note that technically a company can’t void your warranty over installing a different cooling solution, but that doesn't mean you won't incur headaches trying to invoke that right. 

At the time of writing, Gigabyte has not announced availability or pricing yet, but expect a premium for the integration of a water block. However, we expect that it'll still be cheaper than buying a custom air-cooled card and replacing the cooler.

  • cryoburner
    Do note that technically a company can’t void your warranty over installing a different cooling solution, but that doesn't mean you won't incur headaches trying to invoke that right.
    At the very least, replacing a graphics card's cooling solution probably should void the warranty. There's no guarantee that an aftermarket cooler will provide adequate cooling for the card, particularly for components other than the graphics processor itself, which could potentially end up trapped behind a water block with minimal airflow.

    Some manufacturers may allow for it, but that's not going to be universal, since you are modifying the hardware. And if an aftermarket water block were to leak, or otherwise caused visible damage to the card, you can be pretty sure they are not going to replace it.
    Reply
  • Blitz Hacker
    cryoburner said:
    At the very least, replacing a graphics card's cooling solution probably should void the warranty. There's no guarantee that an aftermarket cooler will provide adequate cooling for the card, particularly for components other than the graphics processor itself, which could potentially end up trapped behind a water block with minimal airflow.

    Some manufacturers may allow for it, but that's not going to be universal, since you are modifying the hardware. And if an aftermarket water block were to leak, or otherwise caused visible damage to the card, you can be pretty sure they are not going to replace it.
    The right to repair clause does state that the repair or modification must not damage the existing product (or the company isn't liable for damages, which I'm assuming if the VRM's aren't cooled with a block for example that wouldn't be covered under warranty because you didn't correctly cool them, same thing with shorting the board.
    Most of the time you can push this right legally if there is a defect in the card for example, but you would usually have to take them to court on it, which most if not all of us don't have the money (or time) to take a company to court, which they pretty much count on.
    Reply