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First Fully Functional Flexible Memory Unveiled

By - Source: KAIST | B 14 comments

The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) announced that it has developed a "fully flexible" non-volatile resistive random access memory (RRAM) device.

According to a press release, a research team was able to integrate a memristor, which is considered to be a possible material for next-generation memory elements, with a high-performance single-crystal silicon transistor on flexible substrates. The result was a fully functional memory that enabled writing, reading and erasing of data.

The scientists said that their discovery showed for the first time that transistors built on plastic substrates can achieve a performance level that is good enough to be considered for computer memory devices. Keon Jae Lee from KAIST's Department of Materials Science and Engineering, said that the "result represents an exciting technology with the strong potential to realize all flexible electronic systems for the development of a freely bendable and attachable computer in the near future."

There was no information about the performance of the memory or the manufacturing of the device. The research was published in the October issue of Nana Letters ACS.

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Top Comments
  • 17 Hide
    mouse24 , November 4, 2011 2:29 PM
    lostmyclantoms please remove that junkie of adds in the words... this is a pain in the as s


    I see no ads, maybe try using Adblock+?
  • 16 Hide
    house70 , November 4, 2011 3:34 PM
    I would not count this as the first flexible memory, though... that would be the paper sheet.
  • 15 Hide
    icepick314 , November 4, 2011 2:35 PM
    mouse24I see no ads, maybe try using Adblock+?


    unless he's on IE....then you're just fucked....
Other Comments
    Display all 14 comments.
  • -4 Hide
    WyomingKnott , November 4, 2011 2:22 PM
    What use is flexible memory? This is a proof of concept for something, but I can't figure out what.
  • 17 Hide
    mouse24 , November 4, 2011 2:29 PM
    lostmyclantoms please remove that junkie of adds in the words... this is a pain in the as s


    I see no ads, maybe try using Adblock+?
  • 15 Hide
    icepick314 , November 4, 2011 2:35 PM
    mouse24I see no ads, maybe try using Adblock+?


    unless he's on IE....then you're just fucked....
  • -4 Hide
    Anonymous , November 4, 2011 2:38 PM
    Are they talking about hard drives, RAM, and cache being the same thing?
  • 10 Hide
    house70 , November 4, 2011 2:44 PM
    WyomingKnottWhat use is flexible memory? This is a proof of concept for something, but I can't figure out what.

    Couple days ago I read about the flexible input display from Nokia; this could be used in the same applications, ultimately towards devices that can be shaped by users depending on their needs.
  • 0 Hide
    mcpcna01 , November 4, 2011 3:00 PM
    This opens up devices of new shapes in areas and places like equipment, appliances that allow them to look good without forcing shape restrictions.
  • 2 Hide
    nordlead , November 4, 2011 3:04 PM
    WyomingKnottWhat use is flexible memory? This is a proof of concept for something, but I can't figure out what.

    There are a lot of potential uses. People always talk about computers built in clothes, and something like this would make it more comfortable. You also have the super thin displays that are flexible and can be rolled up. You could theoretically make an entire computer than can roll up.

    Not a lot of uses for general PCs though.
  • 1 Hide
    memadmax , November 4, 2011 3:20 PM
    This has potential use in alot of applications, aerospace being one of them. Ultralight, thin, perfect for light aircraft and spacecraft.
  • 16 Hide
    house70 , November 4, 2011 3:34 PM
    I would not count this as the first flexible memory, though... that would be the paper sheet.
  • 2 Hide
    bucknutty , November 4, 2011 4:00 PM
    WyomingKnottWhat use is flexible memory? This is a proof of concept for something, but I can't figure out what.


    Imagine the memory of smart phone being a thin piece of plastic film applied to part of the case. If you don’t have to design around a specific size or shape chip, but instead could shape the chip to any thing you want that leaves you options to make the phone more fun looking, or to make more room for battery or cooling or cpu. Imagine this in tablets or laptops. It could be lighter and smaller and be applied like ribbon cable with only a bit of sticky.
  • 2 Hide
    zilnicra , November 4, 2011 5:06 PM
    we can totally use this for those suffering from alzheimers, implant it in the skull... they can now remember!! :D 
  • 2 Hide
    alyoshka , November 4, 2011 5:36 PM
    Uses can only be imagined....... you really need to be more imaginative in the technical field to find uses for this.
    Forget the flexibility part of equipment it might be added into, just imagine how easy it would be to transport it, no breaking and damaging if it got bent or twisted. Imagine it being in the HDMI cable of a TV or a PC just to store and transport data..... not just 2 ways but N directional....
  • 0 Hide
    back_by_demand , November 4, 2011 11:44 PM
    Eventually they will find a way to make it transparent also
    The next step is to get flexible & transparent batteries
    Then storage
    Then processors
    ...
    Combine with flexible display and you have a sheet of clear plastic that miraculously is a whole working computer
    ...
    It's all just a few years away and so obvious
  • 0 Hide
    freggo , December 26, 2011 1:33 PM
    zilnicrawe can totally use this for those suffering from alzheimers, implant it in the skull... they can now remember!!


    Yeah, but what happens if Grandpa gets a Virus?
    That would allow a Hacker to remotely control him, and lord knows what that leads too :-)