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NCSA's 11.5 PFlops Blue Waters Supercomputer in Testing

By - Source: NCSA | B 15 comments

The National Center For Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) has opened its Blue Waters system to the science community.

The new supercomputer entered into "friendly-user" mode and is now accessible by National Science Foundation-approved science and engineering teams. NCSA said that "selected" users "will have access to the entire system during this window in order to help the Blue Waters team test and evaluate the full system and to expedite the Petascale Computing Resource Allocation (PRAC) teams' ability to use the full Blue Waters system productively as soon as it is in full production status."

Blue Waters, a $188 million system, which was originally designed to be based on IBM architecture, consists of "more than" 235 Cray XE6 cabinets based on "more than" 49,000 AMD Opteron 6200-series processors, as well as "more than" XK6 30 cabinets based on "more than" 3,000 Nvidia Tesla GPUs.

The expected peak performance will exceed 11.5 petaflops, according to the NCSA. Total nearline storage space will be more than 500 PB.

 

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  • 11 Hide
    grantwar , November 9, 2012 3:07 PM
    Really? crysis and football manager...I think you guys are missing the bigger picture here!

    Just imagine Solitaire running on that beauty :) 
Other Comments
  • 2 Hide
    cats_Paw , November 9, 2012 2:48 PM
    AMD with nvidia... Brace yourself, "But can it run Crysis?" Comments Incoming.
  • -6 Hide
    Anonymous , November 9, 2012 2:49 PM
    but can it run crysis
  • 5 Hide
    monktongaz , November 9, 2012 3:04 PM
    I don't know about Crysis, but just imagine what this baby could do with Football Manager 2013.
  • 11 Hide
    grantwar , November 9, 2012 3:07 PM
    Really? crysis and football manager...I think you guys are missing the bigger picture here!

    Just imagine Solitaire running on that beauty :) 
  • 3 Hide
    vittau , November 9, 2012 3:24 PM
    It takes some serious creativity and ingenuity to program for 49.000+ cores.
  • 2 Hide
    freggo , November 9, 2012 3:25 PM
    How about Pong in multi-player mode...
  • 1 Hide
    jn77 , November 9, 2012 3:34 PM
    I could put that to good use with Photoshop and Premier for 4k video editing 10000x speed
  • 4 Hide
    memadmax , November 9, 2012 4:21 PM
    vittauIt takes some serious creativity and ingenuity to program for 49.000+ cores.


    Not really, all you have to do is create a loop that creates worker threads for all the cores.
  • 0 Hide
    silverblue , November 9, 2012 4:52 PM
    I bet they also have an excuse as to the CPU choice... "well, it seemed a good idea two/three years back...". :p 
  • 3 Hide
    wiyosaya , November 9, 2012 6:45 PM
    memadmaxNot really, all you have to do is create a loop that creates worker threads for all the cores.

    And have a data set that you can split into 49,000 parts. :) 
  • -2 Hide
    A Bad Day , November 9, 2012 7:42 PM
    For a second, I thought they used Netburst CPUs.

    That place would've became the world's largest and most expensive baking oven.
  • 1 Hide
    cookoy , November 9, 2012 9:01 PM
    those test and evaluaton suite better not include iTune :-)
  • 0 Hide
    buckcm , November 10, 2012 12:13 AM
    But how would it handle a while(1){ fork(); } loop?
  • 1 Hide
    darkavenger123 , November 10, 2012 1:37 AM
    But can it play Crysis??? :p 

    ok, just joking...don't like Crysis anyway...
  • 0 Hide
    blazorthon , November 12, 2012 6:43 AM
    cookoythose test and evaluaton suite better not include iTune :-)


    Why not? One instance per core for the entire system could be run as a benchmark. Remember, software doesn't need to be multi-threaded to benefit from multiple cores if it can have multiple instances run in parallel and I see no reason for why you couldn't do that with iTunes.