Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Test System And Benchmark Suite

Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 13 Review: One Flexible Ultrabook
By

Test System Specs

We needed to compare the Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 13 to a similar system. Being so unique, this proved problematic. Luckily, Dell also offers an Ultrabook that could give the Yoga a run for its money in the Southwest Regional Twister Championship. The similarly-priced and -spec'd Dell XPS 12 features that nifty flip-screen which first debuted in 2010 with the company's Inspiron Duo netbook.

The table below contains the pertinent specs of the Yoga 13 side-by-side with the Dell XPS 12:


Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 13
Dell XPS 12
Processor
Intel Core i7-3517U @ 1.9 GHz (quad-core)
Intel Core i7-3517U @ 1.9 GHz (quad-core)
Platform
Intel QS77 Express Chipset
Intel QS77 Express Chipset
Memory
8 GB PC3-12800 @ 1600 MT/s (1 x 8 GB)
8 GB PC3-12800 @ 1600 MT/s (2 x 4 GB)
Graphics
Intel HD Graphics 4000 (integrated)
Intel HD Graphics 4000 (integrated)
Storage
128 GB Samsung PM830 SSD
128 GB Samsung PM830 SSD
Display
13.3" IPS @ 1600x900
12.5" IPS @ 1920x1080

Both the Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 13 and Dell XPS 12 incorporate similar QS77-based system boards. They also utilize the same third-generation Core i7-3517U processor with embedded Intel HD Graphics 4000, 8 GB of PC3-12800 RAM, and their own respective OEM versions of the PM830 128 GB SSD. However, there are a couple of small (yet noteworthy) differences that we need to be keep in mind.

First, the resolution of the Dell XPS 12’s IPS display is 1920x1080, while the Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga’s is only 1600x900. Secondly, the 8 GB SDRAM version of the Dell XPS 12 has two banks (2 x 4 GB) of DDR3 soldered directly to the system board versus the Lenovo’s removable single-module design.

Benchmark Suite

Synthetics
Futuremark PCMark 7
Version: 1.0.4, System, Productivity, Hard Disk Drive Bbenchmarks
PassMark PerformanceTest
Version: 8.0 Build 1008, System, CPU, Memory, Graphics, Hard Drive Benchmarks
Maxon Cinebench
Version 11.5 Build CB25720DEMO
CPU Test single- and multi-threaded
Futuremark 3DMark 11
Version: 1.0.3.0, Benchmark Only
File Compression
WinZip
Version 17.0 Pro: THG-Workload (2.01 GB) to ZIP, command line switches "-a -ez -p -r"
WinRAR
Version 4.20: THG-Workload (2.01 GB) to RAR, command line switches "winrar a -r -m3"
7-Zip
Version 9.20: THG-Workload (2.01 GB) to 7z, command line switches "a -t7z -r -m0=LZMA2 -mx=5"
Media Transcoding
iTunes
Version 11.0.2.26: Audio CD "Terminator II SE", 52 min, convert .wav to .m4a audio format
LAME
Version 3.98.3: Audio CD "Terminator II SE", 53 min, convert .wav to .mp3 audio format, Command: -b 160 --nores (160 Kb/s)
HandBrake CLI
Version 0.98: (3) Short Media Sequences Transcoded: 1080i, 25fps, High Profile, .mov to H.264/.mp4
Productivity
Acrobat XI Pro
Version 11.0.2: Print PDF from 115 Slide PowerPoint Presentation, Print PDF from 110 Page MS Word .docx Document
PhotoShop CS6
Version 13.0.1 x64: Filter 16 MB TIF Image: Radial Blur, Shape Blur, Median, Polar Coordinates
Premiere Pro CS6
Version 6.0.3: 2:22 MXF Project to H.264, Output 1280x720, 59.94fps
After Effects CS6
Version 11.0.2 x64: Media Project Encode, 3 Streams, 210 Frames, Render Multiple Frames Simultaneosly
ABBYY FineReader
Version 11.0.1: Read PDF save to .docx Document, Source: The Balanced Scorecard: Translating Strategy into Action 1996, Robert S. Kaplan, David P. Norton, 17 MB .pdf

Display Testing Methodology

The Spyder4Elite utilizes a full-spectrum, seven-color optical sensor and connects to the host PC via USB 2.0.

The raw screen data generated by the sensor through its manual placement around the display screen being tested is read by the included Datacolor menu-driven software suite and then efficiently plotted and graphed before walking the user through a simple and mostly automatic process of calibrating the screen.

Overall, the solution is very intuitive, easy to master, and provides some invaluable single (and multiple) screen testing and calibration capabilities for those who want their visual computing experience to be accurate and performing to its full potential.

We setup our display testing and calibration station in a dark room with the Yoga 13 connected to AC power while sitting on a flat surface. As usual, we are utilizing the Datacolor Spyder4Elite to record our screen measurements.

Tip: In order to ensure hardware accuracy, it is important to confirm the display of the test system itself is powered on for at least 30 minutes with no screen timeouts or other sleep modes enabled prior to the commencement of any testing and/or calibration of the display.

Booting Up!

After a very snappy 12-second initial boot time, we quickly navigate to the Windows Device Manager for a detailed view of the components inside our Yoga 13 sample.

Device ManagerDevice ManagerHWiNFO64 HWiNFO64

Utilizing the widely-available HWiNFO64 utility, we can see in great detail just about every aspect of the Yoga 13’s hardware inventory, general specifications, and current operating status. Beyond the specific system board, processor, graphics, and drive reporting, we can also see that the system memory is only running is single-channel (asymmetric) mode.

Our Yoga 13 gets pretty solid Windows Experience Index scores for an Ultrabook. But as always, we take these ratings with a grain of salt, as they are simply reference baselines, not actual performance scores.

Speaking of...

Display all 20 comments.
This thread is closed for comments
  • 0 Hide
    danaistina , June 12, 2013 11:26 PM
    I bought a yoga 13 a few months ago. Author of the article obviously has some special version of this ultrabook, which no one else, including me and the people of the Lenovo forums has heard that there is no following problems: touchpad does not support all Windovs 8 gestures, wirerless card has very weak signal, runs very hot and noise from the vents is loud. And finally: windows 8 has not yet up to use touch screen like a android or ios devices.
  • 0 Hide
    kartu , June 12, 2013 11:57 PM
    Would be nice to see the same thing with AMD's Jaguar based APU.
  • 2 Hide
    danaistina , June 12, 2013 11:57 PM
    I bought a yoga 13 a few months ago. Author of the article obviously has some special version of this ultrabook, which no one else, including me and the people of the Lenovo forums has heard that there is no following problems: touchpad does not support all Windovs 8 gestures, wirerless card has very weak signal, runs very hot and noise from the vents is loud. And finally: windows 8 has not yet up to use touch screen like a android or ios devices.
  • 1 Hide
    sgadadish , June 13, 2013 3:29 AM
    Tent (Joke) Mode : simply serving as a digital picture frame placed tastefully on a shelf or desk . , Sure...
  • 0 Hide
    hothfox , June 13, 2013 7:45 AM
    I contemplated this and the Thinkpad Twist, and wound up getting the Twist, largely because when you flip it around to it's tablet mode, the keyboard and touchpad are covered by the screen, instead of exposed.
  • 0 Hide
    Amdlova , June 13, 2013 8:07 AM
    9hr battery... idle and screen of... 5 hr real condition... when we get something can do 12 hrs.
  • 0 Hide
    whyso , June 13, 2013 8:16 AM
    How is the yoga gettng better bandwidth numbers that it is in theory capable of? 21GB/sec for cached read when theoretically it maxes out at 12.8 GB/sec
  • 0 Hide
    ojas , June 14, 2013 10:40 AM
    Are those external body temperature is degrees Celsius or Fahrenheit?
  • 0 Hide
    Kattie Anderson , June 14, 2013 4:27 PM
    Get a premium support for yoga at http://ytechsupport.com/lenovo-laptop-support-.html
  • 0 Hide
    Kattie Anderson , June 14, 2013 4:31 PM
    http://ytechsupport.com/lenovo-laptop-support-.html
  • 0 Hide
    AMKANMBA , June 15, 2013 12:00 PM
    I think the xps and lenovo convertible laptops are the same. No two processors are alike(I am a fan of dell though, happy to see it win).
  • 0 Hide
    Fernando Lopez Martinez , June 15, 2013 5:14 PM
    Quote:
    I bought a yoga 13 a few months ago. Author of the article obviously has some special version of this ultrabook, which no one else, including me and the people of the Lenovo forums has heard that there is no following problems: touchpad does not support all Windovs 8 gestures, wirerless card has very weak signal, runs very hot and noise from the vents is loud. And finally: windows 8 has not yet up to use touch screen like a android or ios devices.

    I agree with you. I also bought a yoga 13 and the Wifi is really bad. For that money, is incredible that the wifi is only N150. I also have lot of problems connecting to some places. I can confirm that those problems are true.

  • 0 Hide
    flowingbass , June 16, 2013 9:43 AM
    Stand mode is just stupid. might as well use laptop mode instead, it takes the same amount of space when in laptop mode but no touchpad and keyboard support and your keyboard is at risk of being dirtied up by the surface you put the device on. Tent mode could be somewhat useful, like if you lack the space to put the device on while requiring to still be able to see the screen.

    the only useful modes i can see is laptop and tablet mode.
  • 0 Hide
    sanilmahambre , June 17, 2013 6:28 AM
    AMD's APU should easily raise the Win 8 graphics rating and decrease the overall amount
  • 0 Hide
    clriis , June 17, 2013 9:27 PM
    Quote: Stand mode is just stupid. might as well use laptop mode instead, it takes the same amount of space when in laptop mode but no touchpad and keyboard support and your keyboard is at risk of being dirtied up by the surface you put the device on. Tent mode could be somewhat useful, like if you lack the space to put the device on while requiring to still be able to see the screen.
    .....

    I find the stand mode to be really ideal when travelling on bus/train/flight and also in general when just sitting in a chair. Place it in your lap and you got a tablet with a 'stand' which you can adjust to an ergonomically correct position and got both hands free
  • 0 Hide
    clriis , June 17, 2013 11:29 PM
    I have been a Yoga owner for the past 3 months and in general I really like this hybrid though it takes some time finding out new ways of utilising and working with, especially when you are also new to the modern/metro interface but I don't find the learning curve steep and for me it's definitely an enjoyable and amusing process. Overall I have no regrets given that it is also a fantastic traditional laptop. As opposed to others I don't find any problems using Windows 8 in traditional desktop mode with mouse and all and no, I don't miss the Start button.

    BUT... as a couple of contributors here have already commented, THE WI-FI / BLUETOOTH MODULE ON THE YOGA IS SERIOUSLY FLAWED. To prove that point just try to Google 'wi fi issues' and see what comes out on top!

    In an otherwise interesting review I'm surprised to see that the WI-Fi section deals with only signal strength and not data transfer rates which is supposedly of more interest to the end user. Here the Yoga is challenged especially if you also use one or more Bluetooth devices (like a mouse and streaming audio). Sitting in a space with -61 to -67 dB signal and with no competing or overlapping channels you at times get transfer rates as low as 6 Mbit/s (turning off BT devices increase the speed to around 25 Mbit).

    The Yoga apparently is also very choosy in which wireless router it's connected to. I have personally tried 5 different ones at home (TP-Link WDR4300, Thomson, TP-Link WR741 with Gargoyle, D-Link DIR645 and Netgear R6300), and with the Netgear R6300 I, in some cases, get the above nearly tolerable speeds, but not anything that can match my other wireless devices. I'm now contemplating purchasing the Netgear A6300 USB adapter in order to obtain reasonable and stable transfer rates although this step also contains a number of cons.

    Despite subsequent driver updates Lenovo/Realtek has not managed to solve these problems. The latest update even includes some kind of USB trigger, installing itself as a running service with log file and all. For all we know it makes the mousepointer flicker every two seconds....hilarious!!!

    I (and I'm sure, many others) would be really interested if Scott could elaborate more on the possibilities of utilising the empty slot for adding/changing the WiFi/BT adapter to a PCIe thingi. What would be the real options given the BIOS whitelist and all???
  • 0 Hide
    timeandspace , June 21, 2013 2:37 AM
    The Lenovo Yoga 13 is big but the 11 is not powerful or fast enough. The yoga 13 is great for anyone who wants the speed and visuals. The other comparable Yoga 11s is great (small and speedy) but expensive.

    I've created a comparison chart at: http://angelinaward.hubpages.com/hub/Lenovo-IdeaPad-Yoga-13-Price-and-Review-Dream-Deal-or-Dead-Loss

    that compares the Yoga 13 vs Yoga 11 vs Yoga 11s vs Macbook Pro. Based on this chart you'll see that the Yoga 13 still remains the best of the bunch and the launch of the Yoga 11s will do everyone a favour prompting sellers to reduce the Yoga 13 price even more.
  • 0 Hide
    timeandspace , June 22, 2013 4:51 AM
    I find the stand mode to be really great when travelling on flight/bus/train and also when just sitting in a chair. Place it in your lap and to get a tablet with a 'stand' which you can adjust to an ergonomically comfortable position and got both hands free.
    The Yoga 13 is great for when I'm in a hurry or I need to show someone something on the fly and my smartphone screen doesn't cut it, I whip this bad boy out. I manage more than twenty websites and online services for friends/customers and this baby does everything. Not to mention I manage to get in some good Command & Conquer when I'm stuck in-line at the doctors.
    The newest one Yoga 11s (small and speedy) sounds great but it’s expensive.

    I've created a comparison chart <a href=" http://angelinaward.hubpages.com/hub/Lenovo-IdeaPad-Yoga-13-Price-and-Review-Dream-Deal-or-Dead-Loss”>Here</a>
    that compares the Yoga 13 vs Yoga 11 vs Yoga 11s vs Macbook Pro.
  • 0 Hide
    timeandspace , June 22, 2013 4:51 AM
    I find the stand mode to be really great when travelling on flight/bus/train and also when just sitting in a chair. Place it in your lap and to get a tablet with a 'stand' which you can adjust to an ergonomically comfortable position and got both hands free.
    The Yoga 13 is great for when I'm in a hurry or I need to show someone something on the fly and my smartphone screen doesn't cut it, I whip this bad boy out. I manage more than twenty websites and online services for friends/customers and this baby does everything. Not to mention I manage to get in some good Command & Conquer when I'm stuck in-line at the doctors.
    The newest one Yoga 11s (small and speedy) sounds great but it’s expensive.

    I've created a comparison chart <a href=" http://angelinaward.hubpages.com/hub/Lenovo-IdeaPad-Yoga-13-Price-and-Review-Dream-Deal-or-Dead-Loss”>Here</a>
    that compares the Yoga 13 vs Yoga 11 vs Yoga 11s vs Macbook Pro.
  • 0 Hide
    timeandspace , June 22, 2013 4:54 AM
    Sorry - the link to the comparison chart didn't come out very well, here it is again, it compares the Yoga 13 with 11, 11s and Macbook pro.
    http://angelinaward.hubpages.com/hub/Lenovo-IdeaPad-Yoga-13-Price-and-Review-Dream-Deal-or-Dead-Loss