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Results: Grayscale Tracking And Gamma Response

Dell UltraSharp 32 Ultra HD Monitor Review: UP3214Q At $3500
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The majority of monitors (especially newer models) display excellent grayscale tracking, even at stock settings. It’s important that the color of white be consistently neutral at all light levels from darkest to brightest. Grayscale performance impacts color accuracy with regard to the secondary colors: cyan, magenta, and yellow. Since computer monitors typically have no color or tint adjustment, accurate grayscale is key.

All of the picture modes in their default state are pretty close to the below chart, which was generated in the Adobe RGB preset.

For an uncalibrated monitor, we're impressed. All errors are under three Delta E and the average value is 1.87. The output level with no adjustments is 236.0479 cd/m2, and the black level is an excellent .1901 cd/m2. Adobe RGB mode returns the best contrast ratio we measured from the UP3214Q: 1242 to 1. You could easily select this mode, dial back the brightness to taste, and enjoy pro-level color accuracy with excellent gamma and contrast.

For our post-calibration chart, we chose the Custom mode and set it up for an Adobe RGB 1998 color space.

This is the best possible result from the UP3214Q. There are no errors of any consequence to discuss. Since Dell includes gain and offset controls for the RGB sliders, it’s easy to dial in excellent white balance. All we had to do was tweak 30 and 80 percent brightness window patterns to achieve an average error of .99 Delta E.

Here’s our comparison group again.

A monitor selling for $3500 should require little to no adjustment to render accurate color and grayscale, and Dell's UP3214Q fulfills that promise. The company includes test results with each screen and we had no trouble duplicating its numbers. An error below two Delta E is promised and delivered. The same is true for both the sRGB and Adobe RGB presets.

Of course, if a monitor includes calibration controls, we’re going to try them out!

This is the best result we could achieve in the Custom mode using the Adobe RGB color space. It is possible to create a custom sRGB color space, but for reasons we’ll explain in a couple of pages, using the preset mode is better. An average error of .99 Delta E is excellent. And because you can select either major color gamut, the UP3214Q is a true professional’s tool.

Gamma Response

Gamma is the measurement of luminance levels at every step in the brightness range from 0 to 100 percent. It's important because poor gamma can either crush detail at various points or wash it out, making the entire picture appear flat and dull. Correct gamma produces a more three-dimensional image, with a greater sense of depth and realism. Meanwhile, incorrect gamma can negatively affect image quality, even in monitors with high contrast ratios.

In the gamma charts below, the yellow line represents 2.2, which is the most widely accepted standard for television, film, and computer graphics production. The closer the white measurement trace comes to 2.2, the better.

The UP3214Q comes with two gamma presets, PC and Mac (also known as 2.2 and 2.0). Regardless of the picture mode selected, the results are the same. It’s pretty much perfect except for small dips at 10- and 90-percent brightness. The only way to improve would be with a multi-point gamma control.

Here’s our test group again for the gamma comparisons.

The aforementioned dips cost the UP3214Q, though a .25 variation in gamma values is extremely small. Our measurements indicate around one cd/m2 of additional brightness at 10 and 90 percent, which is an error you won’t see with a naked eye.

We calculate gamma deviation by simply expressing the difference from 2.2 as a percentage.

With an average value of 2.16, Dell rides very close to the 2.2 standard. When we checked out the Mac gamma, we got a similar result. Such an excellent result befits this display's status as a professional tool.

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  • 10 Hide
    ubercake , March 7, 2014 3:50 AM
    What I always find entertaining is how these monitor manufacturers will only back their $500+ (in this case $2000+) products for a maximum of 3 years, but my $250 power supply has a 7-year warranty and my $200 SSD has a 5-year warranty.
  • 10 Hide
    0217422356 , March 7, 2014 3:11 AM
    It's so expensive that I could buy more than twenty 1080p monitors.
Other Comments
  • 10 Hide
    0217422356 , March 7, 2014 3:11 AM
    It's so expensive that I could buy more than twenty 1080p monitors.
  • -6 Hide
    0217422356 , March 7, 2014 3:14 AM
    It's so expensive that I could buy more than twenty 1080p monitors.
  • 0 Hide
    0217422356 , March 7, 2014 3:24 AM
    I wish in 3 years the price of 4k monitors would come to $300.
  • 10 Hide
    ubercake , March 7, 2014 3:50 AM
    What I always find entertaining is how these monitor manufacturers will only back their $500+ (in this case $2000+) products for a maximum of 3 years, but my $250 power supply has a 7-year warranty and my $200 SSD has a 5-year warranty.
  • -3 Hide
    panzerknacker , March 7, 2014 5:07 AM
    Unacceptible input lag, display not suitable for gaming.
  • 4 Hide
    s3anister , March 7, 2014 5:41 AM
    Quote:
    It's so expensive that I could buy more than twenty 1080p monitors.

    Yes, but you miss the point.
    Quote:
    I wish in 3 years the price of 4k monitors would come to $300.

    This is a reasonable expectation, with economies of scale the average consumer will eventually be able to buy a 4K display for $300-$500 USD.
    Quote:
    What I always find entertaining is how these monitor manufacturers will only back their $500+ (in this case $2000+) products for a maximum of 3 years, but my $250 power supply has a 7-year warranty and my $200 SSD has a 5-year warranty.

    Agreed. I've owned a few Dell Ultrasharp monitors and have always been surprised at the short length of warranty compared to what I get from other premium components. Sadly the entire display industry is like this in terms of warranty coverage.
    Quote:
    Unacceptible input lag, display not suitable for gaming.

    You also miss the point. I assume you didn't even read the article.

    Anyway, great article. I was hoping TH would get around do doing a proper review of this monitor as I'm expecting it to be the benchmark for future 4K panels.
  • 1 Hide
    tttttc , March 7, 2014 9:15 AM
    "The company also introduced a budget-oriented 28-inch model as well, the P2815Q. Gamers might favor it more, since it's a $700 screen with a faster-responding TN panel."P2815Q has only a refresh rate of 30Hz... gamers might not favor it more...
  • 0 Hide
    ceberle , March 7, 2014 10:29 AM
    Quote:
    "The company also introduced a budget-oriented 28-inch model as well, the P2815Q. Gamers might favor it more, since it's a $700 screen with a faster-responding TN panel."P2815Q has only a refresh rate of 30Hz... gamers might not favor it more...


    We hope to test the P2815Q very soon. In the meantime, we have the UP2414Q in the lab now. This is a 24-inch IPS screen for around $1200.

    -Christian-
  • 1 Hide
    Tanquen , March 7, 2014 10:59 AM
    Why is the bezel so F-ing big? When are desktop monitors (that weight less than a TV and people actually put two or more next to each other) going to have slim or nonexistent bezels?

    $3500 16:9?????? Good grief!
  • 0 Hide
    burmese_dude , March 7, 2014 11:12 AM
    "There’s no question that 4K is here."Good. Cuz I was questioning before I read that. Now I won't question anymore.
  • -2 Hide
    bak0n , March 7, 2014 1:06 PM
    Or you can go buy a 4k Samsung TV that's 55" for the same price and get a TV tuner and a bigger screen with it.
  • 1 Hide
    soldier44 , March 7, 2014 1:43 PM
    You get what you pay for people. Ive been gaming on a 30 inch 2506 x 1600 display for over 3 years now paid $1200 and been worth every cent. Will wait till next year to see more brands come out and prices drop to a better level like under $1500.
  • 0 Hide
    ahnilated , March 7, 2014 1:52 PM
    Hah! Look at the reviews on Newegg. This monitor has 2 stars and from what I read they have some serious issues with this thing.
  • 1 Hide
    milkod2001 , March 7, 2014 2:02 PM
    very expensive screen that's for sure. it'll take at least 3 years till price will drop into $1000. Even for $1000 it'll be unreachable for most users.I'd rather see SAMSUNG, DELL, LG pushing 27'' 1440p monitors into mainstream with price something like $300-350. At the moment for that price one can only get poxy Korean screens. I'm sure this would make more sales than 4k $3500 madness.
  • 2 Hide
    Bondfc11 , March 7, 2014 2:13 PM
    First this isn't a true 4K panel although everyone seems to accept 3 different resolution numbers and call them all 4K. Silly. Second, 4K is not here. It is being pushed on consumers by companies still pissed we didn't all drink the 3D Koolaid and rush out and by those crappy sets and monitors. Third, there are some great 1440 1600 options out there that rock (Overlord IPS, ASUS although it is not a great panel - TN - which I hate, etc.) 4K is not going to be a realistic investment for MOST gamers in 2014 due to the tech being way too pricey. One day, sure, but definitely not this year.
  • 0 Hide
    milkod2001 , March 7, 2014 2:14 PM
    very expensive screen that's for sure. it'll take at least 3 years till price will drop into $1000. Even for $1000 it'll be unreachable for most users.I'd rather see SAMSUNG, DELL, LG pushing 27'' 1440p monitors into mainstream with price something like $300-350. At the moment for that price one can only get poxy Korean screens. I'm sure this would make more sales than 4k $3500 madness.
  • 0 Hide
    milkod2001 , March 7, 2014 2:15 PM
    very expensive screen that's for sure. it'll take at least 3 years till price will drop into $1000. Even for $1000 it'll be unreachable for most users.I'd rather see SAMSUNG, DELL, LG pushing 27'' 1440p monitors into mainstream with price something like $300-350. At the moment for that price one can only get poxy Korean screens. I'm sure this would make more sales than 4k $3500 madness.
  • 2 Hide
    DisplayJunkie , March 7, 2014 8:48 PM
    This is very clearly primarily a display for graphics professionals (good Adobe RGB mode, factory calibrated, uniformity compensation). Because for raw eye-popping image quality - which is what your average consumer is looking to improve - 1000:1 contrast ratio is pathetic. That's why display tech such as Plasma TVs and high-end Projectors with 10,000:1, 20,000:1 and even higher contrast ratio are truly stunning. The high pixel density here makes for nice sharpness but it doesn't really compensate for the lack of contrast, and I haven't even mentioned motion clarity...
  • 0 Hide
    eriko , March 7, 2014 9:24 PM
    I've added it to my Flea-Bay alerts, so as soon as someone is bored of one of these.... :) But to you all I have a simple question - is the latency too much for gaming, I mean really? I don't go around measuring latency, so you real-world opinions, I seek.Thanks.
  • 0 Hide
    wiinippongamer , March 8, 2014 12:18 AM
    Overpriced garbage with shit contrast and input lag. Wake me up when we wave 20"+ OLED in the 1k range.
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