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Dell UltraSharp 32 Ultra HD Monitor Review: UP3214Q At $3500

Packaging, Physical Layout, And Accessories

The first item we find in the box is a calibration data sheet showing the results of Adobe RGB and sRGB color tests, grayscale and gamma graphs, and uniformity measurements for both luminance and color. To save you the trouble of skipping ahead, we were able to either match or exceed Dell’s numbers. This is a professional tool for sure. The entry price is steep, but the quality is there.

Also included with the UP3214Q are USB 3.0 and DisplayPort cables. The power supply is internal, so any standard IEC power cord will work if you don’t use the one in the box. A CD containing the user manual, drivers, and Dell Display Manager rounds out the bundle.

Product 360

Although the UP3214Q looks purposeful, it doesn’t call attention to itself in any overt manner. It is quite large though; you don’t see 31.5-inch screens on many desktops. Take a closer look and you’ll notice the all-metal base and upright. They’re made of a satin-finished aluminum and they exude quality. The bezel is reasonably narrow, measuring 24 mm all around, and it's surrounded by a silver band. Ergonomic adjustments include 3.5 inches of height, 45 degrees of swivel, and 15 degrees of tilt. All of the movements are precise and the panel stays put once you find the right position.

The screen’s anti-glare layer is one of the best we’ve seen. It strikes a perfect balance between light rejection and clarity. This is something we can’t measure, but in my opinion, this panel looks sharper than the Asus PQ321Q. You know from my comments on that monitor how small text and other objects become in Windows when running at native resolution without DPI scaling turned on. Where the Asus required scaling in most applications, this Dell can be used without any software assistance. When you can avoid using DPI scaling, the amount of desktop real estate at  your disposal is unmatched.

The upright has a hole for cable management, which helps keep your desktop nice and tidy. The input panel can be covered with a snap-on piece that’s included in the box.

The UP3214Q is not the slimmest monitor, but its gentle tapers and rounded corners make it seem thinner than Dell's two-inch specification suggests. The band surrounding the panel is made from the same aluminum as the base and upright. There's an SD card slot built-in, though it's hard to see in the photo. You have to plug in the USB cable to enable it, and the drivers are on the bundled CD.

The included stand snaps on easily, requiring no tools to assemble. Removing it is a simple matter of pressing the button below the cavity. Inside, you'll find four VESA-compatible fittings for use with aftermarket brackets and stands.

With the cable cover in place, the back is totally smooth. Ventilation is facilitated by a barely-visible line across the top of the panel.

Inputs are digital-only and include DisplayPort, mini-DisplayPort, and HDMI. The only way to use the UP3214Q at its native resolution with a 60 Hz refresh rate is via DisplayPort. To do this, set the version to 1.2 in the OSD to enable the multi-stream feature. You can see a full 3840x2160 pixel image over HDMI, but you’ll be limited to 30 Hz. The USB ports are all 3.0-compatible. The fourth downstream connector is just to the right of the input panel and faces rearward.

There are no speakers built into the UP3214Q. However, if you want them, Dell will sell you this little soundbar that mounts on the bottom edge of the panel. It’s a powered unit with its own volume control. We didn’t have the chance to try it out though, so we can't speak to its utility compared to the tinny drivers we typically find integrated with monitors.

  • 0217422356
    It's so expensive that I could buy more than twenty 1080p monitors.
    Reply
  • 0217422356
    It's so expensive that I could buy more than twenty 1080p monitors.
    Reply
  • 0217422356
    I wish in 3 years the price of 4k monitors would come to $300.
    Reply
  • ubercake
    What I always find entertaining is how these monitor manufacturers will only back their $500+ (in this case $2000+) products for a maximum of 3 years, but my $250 power supply has a 7-year warranty and my $200 SSD has a 5-year warranty.
    Reply
  • panzerknacker
    Unacceptible input lag, display not suitable for gaming.
    Reply
  • s3anister
    12831333 said:
    It's so expensive that I could buy more than twenty 1080p monitors.
    Yes, but you miss the point.
    12831370 said:
    I wish in 3 years the price of 4k monitors would come to $300.
    This is a reasonable expectation, with economies of scale the average consumer will eventually be able to buy a 4K display for $300-$500 USD.
    12831456 said:
    What I always find entertaining is how these monitor manufacturers will only back their $500+ (in this case $2000+) products for a maximum of 3 years, but my $250 power supply has a 7-year warranty and my $200 SSD has a 5-year warranty.
    Agreed. I've owned a few Dell Ultrasharp monitors and have always been surprised at the short length of warranty compared to what I get from other premium components. Sadly the entire display industry is like this in terms of warranty coverage.
    12831763 said:
    Unacceptible input lag, display not suitable for gaming.
    You also miss the point. I assume you didn't even read the article.

    Anyway, great article. I was hoping TH would get around do doing a proper review of this monitor as I'm expecting it to be the benchmark for future 4K panels.
    Reply
  • tttttc
    "The company also introduced a budget-oriented 28-inch model as well, the P2815Q. Gamers might favor it more, since it's a $700 screen with a faster-responding TN panel."P2815Q has only a refresh rate of 30Hz... gamers might not favor it more...
    Reply
  • ceberle
    12833028 said:
    "The company also introduced a budget-oriented 28-inch model as well, the P2815Q. Gamers might favor it more, since it's a $700 screen with a faster-responding TN panel."P2815Q has only a refresh rate of 30Hz... gamers might not favor it more...

    We hope to test the P2815Q very soon. In the meantime, we have the UP2414Q in the lab now. This is a 24-inch IPS screen for around $1200.

    -Christian-
    Reply
  • Tanquen
    Why is the bezel so F-ing big? When are desktop monitors (that weight less than a TV and people actually put two or more next to each other) going to have slim or nonexistent bezels?

    $3500 16:9?????? Good grief!
    Reply
  • burmese_dude
    "There’s no question that 4K is here."Good. Cuz I was questioning before I read that. Now I won't question anymore.
    Reply