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Dell UltraSharp 32 Ultra HD Monitor Review: UP3214Q At $3500

Results: Viewing Angles And Uniformity

While the UP3214Q uses a different panel than the Asus PQ321Q, they are both IPS screens using IGZO technology. Therefore, we expect similar results in their off-axis viewing performance. The Dell, like the Asus, shows a slight green tint when moving to the sides, and only minimal light reduction when moving above or below the center of the screen. No LCD is perfect due to the one trait that every panel shares: its light travels to you through a polarizer. While IPS makes huge improvements over TN in this regard, all desktop displays are best viewed as close to the center axis as possible.

Screen Uniformity: Luminance

To measure screen uniformity, zero- and 100-percent full-field patterns are used, and nine points are sampled. In a change from previous reviews, we’re now comparing the results to other monitors we’ve measured. First, we establish a baseline measurement at the center of each screen. Then the surrounding eight points are measured and their values expressed as a percentage of the baseline, either above or below. This number gets averaged. It is important to remember that we only test the review sample each vendor sends us. Other examples of the same monitor can measure differently in this metric.

First up is black field uniformity.

As we mentioned earlier, the Uniformity Compensation feature is effective but not entirely without compromise. Remember the ANSI contrast test, where turning it on reduced the result by 25 percent. Here is the upside of that. In a black field pattern, we see a 1.65-percent improvement. We can’t see them but our C6 luminance meter tells us the hot spots are in the upper-left, upper-right, and lower-right corners.

The following chart reflects the white field measurement.

The improvement is even more significant in this test, to the point that Dell's UP3214Q takes the crown as the monitor with the best white field uniformity ever seen in our labs. Even with the compensation off, it comes in at a very respectable 9.06 percent. Interestingly, the other screen with an extremely low result, Samsung’s S27B971D, also has a uniformity compensation feature.

Screen Uniformity: Color

To measure color uniformity, we display an 80-percent white field and measure the Delta E error of the same nine points on the screen. Then we simply subtract the lowest value from the highest to arrive at the result. A smaller number means a display is more uniform. Any value below three means a variation that is invisible to the naked eye.

The uniformity look-up table scores another victory in the color test. While a Delta E variation of 4.53 isn’t too bad, 1.31 is even better. If you leave the compensation off, there's an obvious flaw in the lower-right corner where we can see a slight green tint. Removing that measurement from the equation results in a 2.73 value. It’s likely that another sample would measure differently.

  • 0217422356
    It's so expensive that I could buy more than twenty 1080p monitors.
    Reply
  • 0217422356
    It's so expensive that I could buy more than twenty 1080p monitors.
    Reply
  • 0217422356
    I wish in 3 years the price of 4k monitors would come to $300.
    Reply
  • ubercake
    What I always find entertaining is how these monitor manufacturers will only back their $500+ (in this case $2000+) products for a maximum of 3 years, but my $250 power supply has a 7-year warranty and my $200 SSD has a 5-year warranty.
    Reply
  • panzerknacker
    Unacceptible input lag, display not suitable for gaming.
    Reply
  • s3anister
    12831333 said:
    It's so expensive that I could buy more than twenty 1080p monitors.
    Yes, but you miss the point.
    12831370 said:
    I wish in 3 years the price of 4k monitors would come to $300.
    This is a reasonable expectation, with economies of scale the average consumer will eventually be able to buy a 4K display for $300-$500 USD.
    12831456 said:
    What I always find entertaining is how these monitor manufacturers will only back their $500+ (in this case $2000+) products for a maximum of 3 years, but my $250 power supply has a 7-year warranty and my $200 SSD has a 5-year warranty.
    Agreed. I've owned a few Dell Ultrasharp monitors and have always been surprised at the short length of warranty compared to what I get from other premium components. Sadly the entire display industry is like this in terms of warranty coverage.
    12831763 said:
    Unacceptible input lag, display not suitable for gaming.
    You also miss the point. I assume you didn't even read the article.

    Anyway, great article. I was hoping TH would get around do doing a proper review of this monitor as I'm expecting it to be the benchmark for future 4K panels.
    Reply
  • tttttc
    "The company also introduced a budget-oriented 28-inch model as well, the P2815Q. Gamers might favor it more, since it's a $700 screen with a faster-responding TN panel."P2815Q has only a refresh rate of 30Hz... gamers might not favor it more...
    Reply
  • ceberle
    12833028 said:
    "The company also introduced a budget-oriented 28-inch model as well, the P2815Q. Gamers might favor it more, since it's a $700 screen with a faster-responding TN panel."P2815Q has only a refresh rate of 30Hz... gamers might not favor it more...

    We hope to test the P2815Q very soon. In the meantime, we have the UP2414Q in the lab now. This is a 24-inch IPS screen for around $1200.

    -Christian-
    Reply
  • Tanquen
    Why is the bezel so F-ing big? When are desktop monitors (that weight less than a TV and people actually put two or more next to each other) going to have slim or nonexistent bezels?

    $3500 16:9?????? Good grief!
    Reply
  • burmese_dude
    "There’s no question that 4K is here."Good. Cuz I was questioning before I read that. Now I won't question anymore.
    Reply