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Dell UltraSharp 32 Ultra HD Monitor Review: UP3214Q At $3500

Results: Pixel Response And Input Lag

To perform these tests, we use a high-speed camera that shoots at 1000 frames per second. Analyzing the video frame-by-frame allows us to observe the exact time it takes to go from a zero-percent signal to a 100% white field.

The pattern generator is placed at the base of the monitor so our camera can capture the precise moment its front-panel LED lights up, indicating that a video signal is being received by the monitor. With this camera placement, we can easily see how long it takes to fully display a pattern after pressing the button on the generator’s remote. This testing methodology allows for accurate and repeatable results when comparing panels.

Here’s a shot of our test setup. Click on the photo to enlarge.

The brighter section of the camera’s screen is what actually appears in the video. You can see the lights of the pattern generator in the bottom of the viewfinder. We flash the pattern on and off five times and average the results.

Here’s the screen draw result.

A 25-millisecond result is just what we’d expect from an IPS screen. Even though IGZO technology has the potential to improve on this aspect of performance, we believe the display’s electronics are the limiting factor. Moving almost 8.3 million pixels requires a lot of bandwidth and it’s going to take time for all the different components to catch up.

Here are the lag results.

If high-speed gaming is your primary reason for buying a 4K screen, Asus' PQ321Q is the better choice right now. For those with super-fast reaction times, you would be better served by a TN-based display equipped with G-Sync, or some other display with a 120 or 144 Hz refresh. Asus and Dell are marketing these as professional-, rather than enthusiast-oriented products. Dell takes that a step further with its selectable color gamuts and precise accuracy. As we’ve stated before, 4K gaming requires two things right now: big compromises and a pile of cash.

  • 0217422356
    It's so expensive that I could buy more than twenty 1080p monitors.
    Reply
  • 0217422356
    It's so expensive that I could buy more than twenty 1080p monitors.
    Reply
  • 0217422356
    I wish in 3 years the price of 4k monitors would come to $300.
    Reply
  • ubercake
    What I always find entertaining is how these monitor manufacturers will only back their $500+ (in this case $2000+) products for a maximum of 3 years, but my $250 power supply has a 7-year warranty and my $200 SSD has a 5-year warranty.
    Reply
  • panzerknacker
    Unacceptible input lag, display not suitable for gaming.
    Reply
  • s3anister
    12831333 said:
    It's so expensive that I could buy more than twenty 1080p monitors.
    Yes, but you miss the point.
    12831370 said:
    I wish in 3 years the price of 4k monitors would come to $300.
    This is a reasonable expectation, with economies of scale the average consumer will eventually be able to buy a 4K display for $300-$500 USD.
    12831456 said:
    What I always find entertaining is how these monitor manufacturers will only back their $500+ (in this case $2000+) products for a maximum of 3 years, but my $250 power supply has a 7-year warranty and my $200 SSD has a 5-year warranty.
    Agreed. I've owned a few Dell Ultrasharp monitors and have always been surprised at the short length of warranty compared to what I get from other premium components. Sadly the entire display industry is like this in terms of warranty coverage.
    12831763 said:
    Unacceptible input lag, display not suitable for gaming.
    You also miss the point. I assume you didn't even read the article.

    Anyway, great article. I was hoping TH would get around do doing a proper review of this monitor as I'm expecting it to be the benchmark for future 4K panels.
    Reply
  • tttttc
    "The company also introduced a budget-oriented 28-inch model as well, the P2815Q. Gamers might favor it more, since it's a $700 screen with a faster-responding TN panel."P2815Q has only a refresh rate of 30Hz... gamers might not favor it more...
    Reply
  • ceberle
    12833028 said:
    "The company also introduced a budget-oriented 28-inch model as well, the P2815Q. Gamers might favor it more, since it's a $700 screen with a faster-responding TN panel."P2815Q has only a refresh rate of 30Hz... gamers might not favor it more...

    We hope to test the P2815Q very soon. In the meantime, we have the UP2414Q in the lab now. This is a 24-inch IPS screen for around $1200.

    -Christian-
    Reply
  • Tanquen
    Why is the bezel so F-ing big? When are desktop monitors (that weight less than a TV and people actually put two or more next to each other) going to have slim or nonexistent bezels?

    $3500 16:9?????? Good grief!
    Reply
  • burmese_dude
    "There’s no question that 4K is here."Good. Cuz I was questioning before I read that. Now I won't question anymore.
    Reply