How about an RTX 4060-Powered Lenovo Legion Slim 5 gaming laptop for under $1000?

Real Deals
(Image credit: Future)

Currently, there are no big sales events on the go, and with Black Friday firmly in the rear-view mirror, it's full steam ahead to the holiday season. This means some deals coming out before Christmas aren't the lowest prices we've ever seen, but should hopefully still be heavily discounted.

For a gaming laptop that packs in one of Nvidia's RTX 4060 mobile gaming graphics cards, and has a 144Hz refresh rate screen that measures 16 inches - paying under $1,000 is a rarity these days, but at Best Buy you can get your hands on exactly that. The Lenovo Legion Slim 5 is only $949 at the moment and is an ideal choice for work or play. 

We reviewed a variant of the Lenovo Legion Slim 5 laptop back in August and were impressed with how well the laptop performed in our suite of benchmark tests, how long the battery lasted, and how affordable it was before any discounts. This earned this gaming laptop a deserved Editor's Choice award for its feature set, price, and performance. 

Lenovo Legion Slim 5 (RTX 4060): now $949 at Best Buy

Lenovo Legion Slim 5 (RTX 4060): now $949 at Best Buy (was $1,349)
A slimline gaming laptop from Lenovo that packs an Nvidia RTX 4060 mobile GPU and pairs with a Ryzen 5 7640HS processor to power the 144Hz 16-inch screen. Other hardware specs include 16GB of DDR5 RAM and a small 512GB SSD.

The Lenovo Legion Slim 5 also comes with 16GB of fast DDR5 RAM which is needed for current gaming. 8GB just won't cut it anymore, and this means you don't have to splurge out on any RAM upgrade. Unfortunately the same can't be said for the SSD. Laptop manufacturers always put in small SSDs, with upgrades raising the price through the roof, so you might want to invest in a larger 2TB-plus SSD for this machine as modern games can easily eat up a meager 512GB.

Stewart Bendle
Deals Writer

Stewart Bendle is a deals writer at Tom's Hardware. A firm believer in “Bang for the buck” Stewart likes to research the best prices for hardware and build PCs that have a great price for performance ratio.

  • valthuer
    As if 4060 wasn't pathetic enough already, its mobile version is even worse - which is a pretty hard feat to achieve! How exactly would any self-respected gamer think that 8 GBs of VRAM are enough for gaming?
    Reply
  • JarredWaltonGPU
    valthuer said:
    As if 4060 wasn't pathetic enough already, its mobile version is even worse - which is a pretty hard feat to achieve! How exactly would any self-respected gamer think that 8 GBs of VRAM are enough for gaming?
    Probably by turning down the settings to high or medium? At least it's better than the 4050 6GB Laptop GPU. :-)

    The thing is, when you look at the alternatives (i.e. laptops with integrated graphics that are basically at the level of an RX 6400 — yes, I'm talking about the 780M and Ryzen 7 7840HS, which has the same 12 CUs as the RX 6400, though it uses RDNA 3), and those start at $799, paying $150 extra to get an RTX 4060 Laptop GPU that's roughly triple the performance for graphics isn't a terrible idea.

    If you want a decent gaming experience on a laptop, you still need a dedicated GPU. Intel isn't going to change that with Xe-LPG, as that's roughly Arc A380 performance, which is roughly going to be on par with the Radeon 780M.

    This is one of the things I find truly frustrating with laptops. There should be models that have a Radeon 780M for at least $250 less than anything with an RTX 4060, but where are those? If one laptop has to include CPU and GPU cooling, and the other only has to deal with a CPU (APU), it should be far less complex and thus less expensive.
    Reply
  • valthuer
    Avro Arrow said:
    You know, the words "Gaming" and "Laptop" should never go together.

    This^^

    JarredWaltonGPU said:
    Probably by turning down the settings to high or medium? At least it's better than the 4050 6GB Laptop GPU. :)

    The thing is, when you look at the alternatives (i.e. laptops with integrated graphics that are basically at the level of an RX 6400 — yes, I'm talking about the 780M and Ryzen 7 7840HS, which has the same 12 CUs as the RX 6400, though it uses RDNA 3), and those start at $799, paying $150 extra to get an RTX 4060 Laptop GPU that's roughly triple the performance for graphics isn't a terrible idea.

    If you want a decent gaming experience on a laptop, you still need a dedicated GPU. Intel isn't going to change that with Xe-LPG, as that's roughly Arc A380 performance, which is roughly going to be on par with the Radeon 780M.

    This is one of the things I find truly frustrating with laptops. There should be models that have a Radeon 780M for at least $250 less than anything with an RTX 4060, but where are those? If one laptop has to include CPU and GPU cooling, and the other only has to deal with a CPU (APU), it should be far less complex and thus less expensive.

    The thing i've always disliked about laptops: when they're used for heavy tasks, such as gaming or video editing, they are bound to generate excessive amounts of heat, which in turn translates into a shorter lifespan.

    Way too much money is required for their purchase, and, even if you can afford them, they always lack something, in comparison to their desktop equivalents.

    I'm primarily a gamer, and, my short experience of them, has taught me to stay away.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    8GB VRAM is fine for entry level gaming, which is what the -60 series is. To brrow a chart from TH's review of the desktop RTX 4060, of which the 4060M is some 10-20% slower than per notebookcheck, it would struggle to reach 1920x1080 60fps outside MMOs and older games, in which case 8GB VRAM is still not an issue.

    Reply
  • JarredWaltonGPU
    valthuer said:
    This^^



    The thing i've always disliked about laptops: when they're used for heavy tasks, such as gaming or video editing, they are bound to generate excessive amounts of heat, which in turn translates into a shorter lifespan.

    Way too much money is required for their purchase, and, even if you can afford them, they always lack something, in comparison to their desktop equivalents.

    I'm primarily a gamer, and, my short experience of them, has taught me to stay away.
    Yeah, I hear you. I have often thought that if I were ever in a situation where I would be on the road frequently, and I wanted a "gaming laptop," I'd just get a high quality laptop that has good battery life and build quality and then buy an Nvidia GeForce Now subscription. The only problem is that I've been at a lot of hotels that have absolute trash WiFi / internet, which means GFN doesn't actually work well — and no other streaming service would be any better.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    There's something to think about. In a few years when 5G UWB is more widespread so you don't have to rely on hotel WiFi, just use your phone, a portable monitor, and a Bluetooth gamepad with nVidia Geforce Now. Far cheaper than a "gaming laptop", and the biggest risk items of being stolen (the monitor and gamepad) are 10% or less the price of a higher end "gaming" laptop.

    Heck, imagine a 5G UWB connected iPad Air (or, in the near future, a Macbook) with the keyboard for work, and gamepad with nVidia GFN for play.
    Reply
  • Amdlova
    Last time I got a gaming laptop comes with the 9300h make serious under volt and that thing don't heat anything but intel loves remove from user the tools to make the life easier.

    What need on these gaming laptop is the user set the power of cpu and graphics. Some gpu starve with 45w when cpu can eat 95w or more.
    Reply