Skip to main content

Microsoft, Dell Releases Free Windows 8 for Dummies, More

Although we have an excellent guide for getting you up to speed with the new Windows 8 environment, Microsoft and Dell have released a downloadable "pocket edition" of Windows 8 for Dummies. This 138-page PDF takes new and experienced Windows users by the hand and dishes out enough information so that they can be productive with the new OS, not an expert.

"Treat this book like you would a dictionary or other reference text," it reads. "Turn to the page with the information you need and say, 'Ah, so that's what they're talking about.' Then put down the book and move on."

The ebook is broken down into seven chapters: The New Start Screen, The Traditional Desktop, Storage (Internal, External and in the Sky), Working with Apps, Engaging the Social Apps, Getting Connected and Having Fun through the Start Screen, and Ten Things You'll Hate About Windows 8 (And How to Fix Them). The latter chapter covers topics like avoiding the desktop, fixing the print screen command, keeping track of open windows, and more.

Also launched is the E-Book Gallery for Microsoft Technologies on TechNet. Here users can download content for ASP.NET, Office, SQL Server, Windows Azure, SharePoint Server and other Microsoft technologies in e-book formats. These include reference, guide, and step-by-step information, and range in subjects including "Deployment guide for Office 2013", "Programming Windows 8 Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript", and more. All the e-books are free, and new books will be posted as they become available.

IT World points out that there are two additional "giant collections" of free Microsoft e-books now available to access, mostly in PDF format. These e-books were gathered by Eric Ligman over on MSDN, some of which are already listed on the previously-mentioned gallery. There are a total of 80 e-books spanning across collection one and collection two.

Contact Us for News Tips, Corrections and Feedback

  • yyk71200
    Avoiding Desktop? Better tell people how to avoid Start Screen.
    Reply
  • deftonian
    Windows 8 for Dummies

    Getting my popcorn ready now. I can only imagine what will be said in this thread regarding the oxymoron of this subject. :)
    Reply
  • Devoteicon
    Calling your consumers dummies is not good PR.
    Reply
  • nah51dog
    yeah i go days at a time without touching the start screen.
    Reply
  • drwho1
    I boot straight to my desktop.... not thanks to MS... who tried to make it impossible to use.

    Long Live the START button! :)
    Reply
  • twisted politiks
    Funny, after reading all of the bad talk on the windows 8 start screen, I was skeptical on switching over. After seeing the windows 8 upgrade pro for $40, I couldn't pass it up (poor college student living on his own). I must say, I have no idea what everybody is talking about with the start screen, I'm just going to assume they haven't used it. I use it as a giant start button, all my programs, directories, and control panel stuff is on there. I am loving it, and am glad I switched over to windows 8. The apps are nice as well, as they provide a more streamlined, aesthetically pleasing environment.
    Reply
  • memadmax
    ffs, just who is the dummy?
    From the free win8 for dummies book:

    "Desktop tile: When it’s time for work, head for
    the Start screen’s desktop tile. The traditional
    Windows desktop appears, shown in Figure 1-2,
    bringing all its power — as well as its detailed,
    cumbersome menus."
    Reply
  • soo-nah-mee
    I think it's a great idea to release this for free, especially since I was considering buying the book. It's unfortunate that even for a techie it takes quite a bit of effort to become proficient with W8. This is what the new generation of PC is going to entail though, so we might as well get used to it.

    Anyone else feel like they are being labeled a "dummy" by Mike Dell and Steve Ballmer if they download the book?
    Reply
  • killerclick
    twisted politiksI must say, I have no idea what everybody is talking about with the start screen, I'm just going to assume they haven't used it. I use it as a giant start button, all my programs, directories, and control panel stuff is on there
    Either laptop user or Microsoft's astroturf fake account.
    Reply
  • memadmax
    Another problem I have with win8 is signing in with a freakin MS hotmail/live(or if ur old school like me, msn =O) account...

    Is this thing reporting back to home(MS) everything I'm doing on my own damn computer?
    Seems far fetched... but it's possible...

    I know i know, adjust my tin hat blah blah blah, but call me....

    cynical...
    Reply