Alienware Rolls Out More Affordable 34-inch QD-OLED WQHD Gaming Monitor

Alienware AW3423DWF
(Image credit: Alienware)

Dell made quite the splash in the gaming monitor realm with the release of the Alienware AW3423DW earlier this year. We were impressed with the gorgeous QD-OLED display, large color gamut, excellent contrast, and 175Hz panel in our hands-on review of the AW3423DW. However, the $1,299 price is probably beyond the budget range of many gamers. So today, Alienware announced a new member to the family, the similarly named AW3423DWF, which is priced slightly lower at $1,099.

The AW3423DWF still features a 34-inch WQHD (3440 x 1440) QD-OLED panel with a 0.1ms GtG response time and a 1800R curve. That means color uniformity, the wide color gamut and inky blacks are still here in full effect. However, the maximum refresh rate has decreased just a smidge from 175Hz to 165Hz.

(Image credit: Alienware)

In addition, the white and black design of the AW3423DW has given way to an all-black motif with the AW3423DWF (Alienware calls the color Dark Side of the Moon). Likewise, the overall footprint is slimmer to better accommodate those with limited desk space.

Alienware AW3423DWF Specs

Swipe to scroll horizontally
Panel Type / BacklightQuantum Dot
Row 1 - Cell 0 Organic Light Emitting Diode
Screen Size / Aspect Ratio34 inches / 21:9
Row 3 - Cell 0 Curve Radius: 1800mm
Max Resolution & Refresh Rate3440x1440 @ 165 Hz
Row 5 - Cell 0 FreeSync Premium Pro
Native Color Depth & Gamut10-bit / DCI-P3
Response Time (GTG)0.1ms
Brightness (mfr)250 nits SDR
Row 9 - Cell 0 1,000 nits HDR
ContrastInfinite
SpeakersNone
Video Inputs2x DisplayPort 1.4
Row 13 - Cell 0 1x HDMI 2.0
Audio2x 3.5mm output
USB 3.21x up, 4x down
Power Consumption51w, brightness @ 200 nits
Panel Dimensions WxHxD w/base32.1 x 16.36-20.69 x 12.04 inches
Row 18 - Cell 0 (815.25 x 415.57-525.57 x 305.71mm)
Weight13.82 pounds (6.9kg)
Warranty3 years

There are some other noticeable hardware changes regarding port layout. Whereas the AW3423DWF came with two HDMI 2.0 ports and one DisplayPort 1.4 connector, the AW3423DWF flips that arrangement, offering one HDMI 2.0 port and two DisplayPort 1.4s. However, you'll still find two 3.5mm audio-out ports and four downstream USB 3.2 ports.

(Image credit: Alienware)

But Alienware didn't stop there; the joystick mounted under the center of the AW3423DWF has been revised to provide quick access to preset game modes. The joystick can also be used to jump to an all-new Creator mode that Alienware added. Alienware adds that the AW3423DWF's ComfortView Plus low blue light mode is TUV-certified and that Variable Refresh Rate is supported at up to 120Hz refresh rates on PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X consoles.

As we mentioned at the onset, Alienware has priced the AW3423DWF at $1,099, representing a $200 price cut compared to the AW3423DW. In addition, the monitor is backed by a 3-year hardware warranty, and Alienware says it will ship in the United States and Canada later this fall. We’ll greet the AW3423DWF in our lab soon to see if it has what it takes to join the ranks of the best gaming monitors.

Brandon Hill is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware. He has written about PC and Mac tech since the late 1990s with bylines at AnandTech, DailyTech, and Hot Hardware. When he is not consuming copious amounts of tech news, he can be found enjoying the NC mountains or the beach with his wife and two sons.

  • Metteec
    One important difference between the AW3423DW and AW3423DWF is that the more expensive AW3423DW includes a G-SYNC Ultimate chip for 1000 nits brightness in HDR 1000 content. The AW3423DWF has an AMD's FreeSync Premium Pro chip and VESA DisplayHDR TrueBlack400. I would not be surprised if the AW3423DWF was quieter because its more expensive brother requires a fan to cool the G-SYNC Ultimate chip.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    $1100 for a monitor which will at some point burn in and then burn out...
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    $1100 for a monitor which will at some point burn in and then burn out...
    QD-OLED is supposed to be much more resistant to screen burn in than traditional OLED.
    Reply
  • helper800
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    $1100 for a monitor which will at some point burn in and then burn out...
    Yeah, and most likely years after it has relevant uses left to it. How many 8+ year old monitors do you use? By the time there is any meaningful burn in on an OLED you will have a need for a substantially better, much more performant, and cheaper display.
    Reply
  • eklipz330
    spongiemaster said:
    QD-OLED is supposed to be much more resistant to screen burn in than traditional OLED.
    Says who? Samsung who designed, manufactures, and sells the panels? Oh, please. Only time will tell if it is truly more resilient. Enough 3rd party testing has not been done to verify this claim.

    If you ask LG, they will also say their panels are now resilient from burn-in. It's not true. They are better than before, but they have not resolved the issue whatsoever.
    Reply
  • junglist724
    Metteec said:
    One important difference between the AW3423DW and AW3423DWF is that the more expensive AW3423DW includes a G-SYNC Ultimate chip for 1000 nits brightness in HDR 1000 content. The AW3423DWF has an AMD's FreeSync Premium Pro chip and VESA DisplayHDR TrueBlack400. I would not be surprised if the AW3423DWF was quieter because its more expensive brother requires a fan to cool the G-SYNC Ultimate chip.
    It says right in the specs in this article that HDR brightness is 1000 nits. The original gsync AW3423DW is also only DisplayHDR TrueBlack400 certified because of the low full screen brightness.

    eklipz330 said:
    Says who? Samsung who designed, manufactures, and sells the panels? Oh, please. Only time will tell if it is truly more resilient. Enough 3rd party testing has not been done to verify this claim.

    If you ask LG, they will also say their panels are now resilient from burn-in. It's not true. They are better than before, but they have not resolved the issue whatsoever.
    The quantum dot layer is much more efficient than the color filters LG uses. Alienware does at least include a 3 year burn in warranty.

    The automatic brightness limiter is still too aggressive for me to buy one though.
    Reply
  • Gam3r01
    helper800 said:
    Yeah, and most likely years after it has relevant uses left to it. How many 8+ year old monitors do you use? By the time there is any meaningful burn in on an OLED you will have a need for a substantially better, much more performant, and cheaper display.
    Two out of my three monitors are pushing 7 and 9 years, respectively.
    I dont consider monitors a piece of performance hardware. It gets the job done, it gets to stay. The vocal minority that is always chasing monitor specs to have the latest and greatest on paper would lead you to believe otherwise.
    Reply
  • mo_osk
    I'm surprised it doesn't offer hdmi 2.1. The G-SYNC module was given as the main reason the AW3423DW didn't have them.
    Reply
  • helper800
    Gam3r01 said:
    Two out of my three monitors are pushing 7 and 9 years, respectively.
    I dont consider monitors a piece of performance hardware. It gets the job done, it gets to stay. The vocal minority that is always chasing monitor specs to have the latest and greatest on paper would lead you to believe otherwise.
    Well I am happy to tell you even w-OLED panels experience only moderate amounts of burn-in after thousands of hours of news stations and otherwise with may static logos on older less burn in resistant OLEDs.
    Reply
  • Rexxx01
    You know guys like this cant be reasoned with. The alienware aw3423dw, is the hottest Monitor on the market even in this recession and ALL of the Tech Channels I frequent have given it Top reviews. If any of them had searched around a bit they would know it has a that 3 year warranty plus a software monitor that moves the screen when idle to precent burn in. Oh Well, you can lead a horse to water...........
    Reply