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AMD's Radeon 300-Series Desktop GPUs Feature HBM Memory; M300 Teased, Too

Next to the new Zen CPU microarchitecture and GPU plans for 2016, AMD also announced its 2015 GPU plans at its Financial Analyst Day 2015 presentation.

At this point, AMD did not name any specific desktop GPUs but did announce that over the course of the next few months we would be seeing a new set of desktop-class AIB (Add-in-Board) graphics cards at an industry event. Of course, there's no need to guess that this is the Radeon 300-series. 

The new GPUs will come with support for Microsoft's upcoming DirectX12, along with support for AMD's LiquidVR and FreeSync. Most notably, however, the new GPUs will come with HBM memory, which is essentially 3D-stacked DRAM, which is said to not only be more efficient than GDDR5, but also much faster. We don't know yet what the actual performance benefits will be in gaming, but it's certainly something we're very excited about. 

On the mobile side, AMD also announced the new Radeon M300 series graphics parts. These are built to be more efficient and should be ideal for operating in parallel with A-Series APUs in notebooks. Naturally, they will also feature support for DirectX12.

With all the developments in virtual reality, we're happy to see that the new desktop-class GPUs will have support for LiquidVR. Whether it will be widely adopted remains to be seen, but what is interesting is that it leverages several of the features we've slowly been informed about over the last few months, including asynchronous shaders, Direct-To-Display, Affinity Multi-GPU, and the latest data latch for more efficient GPU-based head-tracking.

Unfortunately, at press time no official details have been made available regarding the actual specifications of the new GPUs. If you're still waiting for these, you'll have to sit tight a little longer.

Follow Niels Broekhuijsen @NBroekhuijsen. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

  • RedJaron
    So, how much GPU power right now is eaten up by GDDR5? If HBM is supposed to use 50% less power, how much will that impact the GPU's full power draw?
    Reply
  • de5_Roy
    great news from amd. can't wait to see fiji and HBM in action.
    Reply
  • Mitrovah
    Isn't Arctic Islands coming out in 2016. If so why bother with FIJI?
    Reply
  • Croc Ography
    Just make a single slot card that actually has some oomph behind it!
    Reply
  • Larry Litmanen
    Isn't Arctic Islands coming out in 2016. If so why bother with FIJI?

    There's a new product that's coming out every year.
    Reply
  • PaulBags
    So, how much GPU power right now is eaten up by GDDR5? If HBM is supposed to use 50% less power, how much will that impact the GPU's full power draw?
    It'll mean more for mobile graphics, but imo any extra efficiency is welcome. It'll also produce less heat, increasing life span and reliability; that might not be an issue now but again it's always welcome.
    Reply
  • Martell1977
    So, how much GPU power right now is eaten up by GDDR5? If HBM is supposed to use 50% less power, how much will that impact the GPU's full power draw?

    That is why I hate percentages. They can be extremely deceiving. Say the GDDR5 uses 20w, so the new uses 10w. It's very deceiving for performance charts as well. It'll say GPU A is 20% faster than GPU B, but the reality turns out to be 14 more FPS for a price difference of $100.
    Reply
  • kyuuketsuki
    Isn't Arctic Islands coming out in 2016. If so why bother with FIJI?
    ... That same justification can be used for never buying anything. There's always something new around the corner.

    Also, ever heard of delays? They happen. Often. For every company. Arctic Islands may not come out as soon as you think.
    Reply
  • ammaross
    So we'll have to wait until Computex for more info? :(
    Reply
  • iPanda
    Wow, nice to see all the promotional lingo being questioned on here. #AttentionToDetail I agree with how much does this actually translate to. Get 'er dun Toms.
    Reply