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AMD Ryzen-Powered Hackintosh System Appears to Violate Apple's EULA

(Image credit: OpenCore Computer)

If you want to install the OpenCore bootloader and install MacOS to turn your private PC into a Hackintosh, you can go ahead and do that without ticking anyone off but purists. However, if you start a company and sell computers with MacOS installed on them without Apple's explicit approval, then you're seriously violating Apple's EULA (end-user license agreement). 

A new company, dubbed OpenCore Computer, is selling AMD Ryzen-powered Hackintosh systems, but it isn't clear if the company has Apple's permission. As spotted by MacRumors, OpenCore Computer's first creation is the Velociraptor: a custom PC that comes with both Windows and MacOS Catalina pre-installed.

But before we continue, we have to clarify that OpenCore Computer is not affiliated with the makers of the OpenCore bootloader. In fact, the volunteers that built the OpenCore bootloader outed the following statement to MacRumors about this project:

"We at Acidanthera are a small group of enthusiasts who are passionate about Apple ecosystem and spend time developing software to improve macOS compatibility with different kinds of hardware including older Apple-made computers and virtual machines. For us, who do this on entirely volunteer and uncommercial basis, for fun, it is shocking and disgusting that some dishonest people we do not even know dare to use the name and logo of our bootloader, OpenCore, as a matter of promotion in some illicit criminal scam. Be warned, that we are nohow affiliated with these people and strongly ask everyone by all means to never approach them. Be safe."

(Image credit: OpenCore Computer)

The system appears to be built into a Lian Li TU150 chassis, packing up to a Ryzen 9 3950X CPU, AMD Radeon Vega VII GPU, alongside 64GB of DDR4 memory, with a starting price of $2200. The company promises a one year warranty (even though its terms and conditions state that their services are provided "as is") and distinguishes itself by offering a system that is an order of magnitude cheaper than the equivalent alternative straight from Apple. 

OpenCore Computer says it will also build a T-Rex Hackintosh system with Threadripper CPUs, and a 'Megalodon' system with unknown specs, set to come out in two months and five months, respectively. 

To buy any OpenCore Computer system, you're required to make a 30 percent deposit, and the company only accepts payment through Bitcoin.

Either way, all we can tell you is not to place an order with them until their status in regards to Apple's approval is confirmed. This is clearly not a US-based company, and there is no guarantee that you'll actually receive your promised computer after paying the deposit. If you want a Hackintosh system, it's probably safer to just build one yourself -- it's not that difficult.

  • punkncat
    Ha, of COURSE it does. Every video and tutorial you see about doing this disclaims that Apple doesn't support or endorse the use of "other" products than what they officially support. They don't have permission and they aren't going to get it. Apple isn't going to endorse undercutting their overpriced systems model.

    This company must be plain dumb to put themselves in a position of risk like that.
    Reply
  • COLGeek
    Like so many others who have tried this, they will fail (and likely get sued into the Dark Ages). Apple has nothing to lose in pursuing legal recourse on this.
    Reply
  • mlee 2500
    Of course it would be trivial for Apple to make a tweak to their OS to brick all of these. Not saying that they would, but that's the risk you would run buying one of these for the express purpose of running OSX.
    Reply
  • spentshells
    That hardware for that price, Hackintosh? I don't see you ever receiving a computer once the coins are sent.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    The system appears to be built into a Lian Li TU150 chassis, packing up to a Ryzen 9 3950X CPU, AMD Radeon Vega VII GPU, alongside 64GB of DDR4 memory, with a starting price of $2200.
    Of course, that starting price only gets you a Ryzen 3700X with the stock cooler, 16GB DDR4-3200 RAM, an RX 580, Two 250GB SSDs (one boot drive for each OS) and a 2TB hard drive for data, apparently with some undefined motherboard and PSU that they aren't listing. So, it's somewhere around $1000-$1100 worth of hardware for $2200, along with the operating systems, at least one of which is grey market, and the other probably is as well. And they charge $600 more just to switch from a 3700X to a 3950X. It's not quite Mac pro pricing, but they are still marking the hardware up by close to 100%. Except they are some unheard of company asking for payments via Bitcoin with no real buyer protection if they fail to deliver. >_>
    Reply
  • MoxNix
    spentshells said:
    That hardware for that price, Hackintosh? I don't see you ever receiving a computer once the coins are sent.

    Anyone dumb enough to think it's for real and order one deserves to lose their money.
    Reply