Gigabyte Z790 QVL Reveals New DDR5-7400, DDR5-7200 RAM

Gigabyte
(Image credit: Gigabyte)

Gigabyte has published a list of unannounced DDR5 memory modules boasting extremely high data transfer rates, including 7000 MT/s, 7200 MT/s, and 7400 MT/s. The modules should be available from various brands, including Gigabyte's own Aorus division, Adata, and Kingston. Unfortunately, the memory sticks will require high voltages and slip into systems powered by high-end motherboards.

As it turns out, Gigabyte's top-of-the-range Z790 Aorus Master platform supports (opens in new tab) (as noticed by @momomo_us (opens in new tab)) DDR5-6800 CL34, DDR5-7000 CL32, DDR5-7200 CL34, and DDR5-7400 CL34 modules from Adata, Corsair, Gigabyte Aorus, and Kingston. These 16GB modules are based on SK hynix A and SK Hynix M memory devices and require 1.4V, 1.45V, or 1.5V voltages. In addition, these modules feature XMP 3.0 profiles for one-click overclocking and are designed to work in pairs, so Gigabyte does not guarantee that four of such modules will work flawlessly.

Intel's 13th Generation Core 'Raptor Lake' processors seem to have higher overclocking potential in general and memory overclocking potential in particular than their predecessors, which is why it looks like DDR5-7000+ memory modules will be available from numerous manufacturers.

So far, only TeamGroup has formally introduced its 32GB DDR5-7200 CL34 dual-channel kits. In contrast, other suppliers of high-speed memory modules are testing their products with all Intel Z790-based motherboards that will become available shortly. Meanwhile, Gigabyte has tested its flagship motherboard with several manufacturers' high-end modules.

(Image credit: Gigabyte)

Speaking of high-end memory module suppliers, they should probably be eager to release their highest-performing memory sticks as soon as possible to offset lost revenue and profits caused by softening demand for PCs among consumers.

While all of the high-performance DRAM sticks tested by Gigabyte with its Z790 Aorus Master mainboard will likely be among the best RAM, there is one crucial thing to note about them. 1.4V – 1.5V voltages for DDR5 memory modules represent a 27% – 36% overvoltage compared to the JEDEC standard, which is a significant increase and will inevitably affect memory ICs and Intel's memory controller. We do not know the longevity of these memory modules and Intel's Raptor Lake CPUs, but significant overclocking usually also means a tradeoff between performance and longevity.

Unfortunately, it is unclear when Adata, Corsair, Gigabyte Aorus, G.Skill, and Kingston will release their DDR5-6800 CL34, DDR5-7000 CL32, DDR5-7200 CL34, and DDR5-7400 CL34 modules and how much will they cost.

Anton Shilov
Freelance News Writer

Anton Shilov is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • wifiburger
    "While all of the high-performance DRAM sticks tested by Gigabyte with its Z790 Aorus Master mainboard will likely be among the best RAM, there is one crucial thing to note about them. 1.4V – 1.5V voltages for DDR5 memory modules represent a 27% – 36% overvoltage compared to the JEDEC standard, which is a significant increase and will inevitably affect memory ICs and Intel's memory controller. We do not know the longevity of these memory modules and Intel's Raptor Lake CPUs, but significant overclocking usually also means a tradeoff between performance and longevity. "

    just use negative offset for VTT termination voltage, that's usually what will degrade the IMC when using 1.5v+ on memory

    running 1.58v on bdie here with my 5900x and have VTT set to 1.5v / 2 without affecting stability; prob can go lower
    Reply