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Retail Boxed Intel Arc A380 Graphics Card Hits Retailers in China

Intel Arc Alchemist A380
(Image credit: Intel)

It has been a little over a month since Intel's official launch of the Intel Arc A380 graphics card in China. However, that doesn’t mean Chinese PC enthusiasts and DIYers could grab an A380 at their favorite retailer or online — they have been exclusively available in pre-built systems or as bulk orders only. Today, one of China’s biggest online electronics retailers started selling Intel Arc A380  retail boxed cards on their own with no bundles or bulk orders.

If you follow this link (opens in new tab) to China’s JD.com retail store, you will find the live product page for the Gunnir Intel Arc A380 Photon 6G OC. It is listed at 1,299 Chinese Yuan, which converts directly to ~$192, but remember that the Chinese price will include a sales tax of 13%. The MSRP is 1,030 Chinese Yuan ($153), so JD.com looks like it is still making some extra profit from this product, which retains some scarcity and novelty value, at least for now. Remember, Intel has partnered up with lots of graphics card makers like Asus, MSI, and Gigabyte, as well as PC OEMs like Acer and HP, so there could be lots of other brands available shortly.

The Intel Arc A380 hasn’t been pulsing that strong on our radar recently, as some more powerful members of the Alchemist series have been revealed in an Intel social media blitz. So, for now, we have had more than enough A380 app and gaming benchmarks, overclocking details, and so on. Meanwhile, details spilled about the upcoming Intel Arc A750 and Arc A770 have got us much more excited about competition in the mid-range desktop GPU space. At the other end of the scale, we think we also saw an Intel Arc A310 recently.

Having mentioned all these, it is worth recapping the specifications of the full range, as we expect them. Please consult the table below for a clear comparison. This data was taken from our extensive Intel Arc Alchemist: everything we know article.

Arc A770

Arc A750

Arc A550?

Arc A380

GPU

Arc ACM-G10

Arc ACM-G10

Arc ACM-G10

Arc ACM-G11

Process (nm)

TSMC N6

TSMC N6

TSMC N6

TSMC N6

Transistors (billion)

21.7

21.7

21.7

7.2

Die size (mm^2)

406

406

406

157

Xe Cores

32

24

16

8

Vector Engines

512

384

256

128

Matrix Engines

512

384

256

128

GPU cores (ALUs)

4096

3072

2048

1024

Clock (GHz)

1.1~2.5?

1.1~2.3?

1.1~2.3?

1.15~2.2?

L2 Cache

16MB

12MB

8MB

4MB

VRAM Speed (Gbps)

16?

16?

16?

14–15.5

VRAM (GB)

16 GDDR6

12 GDDR6

8 GDDR6

6 GDDR6

Bus width

256

192

128

96

ROPs

128?

96?

64?

32?

TMUs

256?

192?

128?

64?

TFLOPS (FP32)

3.7~18.4?

6.8~14.1?

4.5~9.4?

1.8~4.5?

TFLOPS Matrix (FP16)

29.6~147.2?

54.4~112.8?

36.0~75.2?

14.4~36.0?

Bandwidth (GB/s)

512?

384?

256?

168–186?

TBP (watts)

250?

200?

150?

75

Launch Date

Q3 2022

Q3 2022

Q3 2022

June 2022 (China)

Launch Price

$449?

$349?

$249?

$129–$139

The emergence of yet more China-based Intel Arc news is probably making enthusiasts impatient about Intel’s launch plans in the west. In our report on the Arc A770, we noted that Intel’s Tom Peterson said that we would see the release of new GPUs like the A750 and A770 “before you know it,” – so the pain of waiting should be over pretty soon. However, it remains to be seen whether any of Intel’s upcoming Arc Alchemist cards will be able to make it into our best graphics cards roundup.

Mark Tyson
Mark Tyson

Mark Tyson is a Freelance News Writer at Tom's Hardware US. He enjoys covering the full breadth of PC tech; from business and semiconductor design to products approaching the edge of reason.

  • RichardtST
    Lol! Love the spelling error! Is Intel trying to save a few pennies?
    Reply
  • samopa
    RichardtST said:
    Lol! Love the spelling error! Is Intel trying to save a few pennies?

    The packaging usually is responsibilities of the partner (in this case Gunnir), not Intel's.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    The jump from 157sqmm to 406sqmm going from A3 to A5 has got to sting. Intel must not intend to sell very many A500s... or possibly ARC altogether.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    This is what I have been expecting. Intel MSRP is as useless as Nvidia and AMD MSRP. The AIB will make their own MSRP to these so that the price is right! (to them)...
    Reply