Intel Arc A770 and A750 Limited Edition Unboxed

The Intel Arc A770 and A750 Limited Edition review kit has arrived, and we're now allowed to show you pictures and videos of the kit. Of course, this is sort of dumb since lots of other places have been doing unboxing videos for a month or more, including Intel. Still, we're excited to finally have Intel's "real" competitor for the best graphics cards in the house (because Intel DG1 and Arc A380 don't really count in my book), and we'll be working on testing for the review over the coming days.

Intel revealed the official Arc A770 and A750 pricing yesterday, which is good news for anyone looking to upgrade to a new graphics card without spending a ton of money. Midrange GPUs are back in style, or at least that's the message Intel seems to be sending, with the A750 priced at $289 and going head to head with Nvidia's RTX 3060. We'll see how that matchup ends up in our upcoming review, and the Arc cards are set to go on sale October 12.

October 12, isn't something else supposed to be happening that day? Oh, yeah, that's when Nvidia will also launch its GeForce RTX 4090, priced at $1,599 and decidedly nowhere near midrange pricing or performance. It's an odd dichotomy, but if Intel wants to get some discrete GPU market share, this should be a promising start.

Intel Arc A770 and A750 Limited Edition cards

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The review kit contained the A770 and A750 Limited Edition cards, Intel's own brand for Arc. Think of these like the LE car models that you might see from various manufacturers. These won't be a limited production run or anything like that, though we'd love to know just how many Arc GPUs Intel has ordered from TSMC.

To quickly recap, the Arc Alchemist GPUs are built using TSMC's N6 process node, with a die size of 406mm^2. That's a pretty chunky die, all things considered — smaller than AMD's Navi 21 (520mm^2) but larger than Navi 22 (335mm^2). With a price point starting south of $300, Intel certainly isn't going to make a ton of money off these GPUs, but it could carve out a modest piece of the graphics card pie.

The two Limited Edition cards are mostly the same, except the A770 includes RGB lighting, along with a USB cable if you want to sync up the lighting with your motherboard's LEDs. Otherwise, the major design elements are identical, with a dual-slot form factor, two 15-blade fans, and 8-pin + 6-pin power connectors. Even TBP (Total Board Power) is the same at 225W.

Under the hood, the A770 Limited Edition has 16GB of faster 17.5 Gbps GDDR6 memory, with 32 Xe cores. The A750 Limited Edition only has 8GB of 16 Gbps GDDR6, with 28 Xe cores. Based on the specs, which you can see below, we expect the A770 will deliver about 10–15% more performance — more in cases where VRAM capacity comes into play. Note that the A770 8GB model will drop the VRAM speed, so we can't help but think the extra $20 for the 16GB card will be worth the upsell.

Swipe to scroll horizontally
Intel Arc Alchemist Specifications
Header Cell - Column 0 Arc A770Arc A750Arc A580Arc A380
ArchitectureACM-G10ACM-G10ACM-G10ACM-G11
Process TechnologyTSMC N6TSMC N6TSMC N6TSMC N6
Transistors (Billion)21.721.721.77.2
Die size (mm^2)406406406157
Xe-Cores3228248
GPU Cores (Shaders)4096358430721024
MXM Engines512448384128
RTUs3228248
Game Clock (MHz)2100205017002000
VRAM Speed (Gbps)17.5 (16GB) / 16 (8GB)161615.5
VRAM (GB)16 / 8886
VRAM Bus Width25625625696
ROPs12812812832
TMUs25622419264
TFLOPS FP32 (Boost)17.214.710.44.1
TFLOPS FP16 (MXM)1381188433
Bandwidth (GBps)560 (16GB) / 512 (8GB)512512186
PCIe Linkx16 4.0x16 4.0x16 4.0x8 4.0
TBP (watts)22522517575
Launch DateOct 12, 2022Oct 12, 2022?June 2022
Starting Price$349 (16GB) / $329 (8GB)$289?$139

Intel seems confident in its ability to compete with Nvidia's RTX 3060 with either of the Arc A700 models. That's all well and good, but we do have to point out that AMD also has cards selling for around $300. For example, the Radeon RX 6650 XT now starts at $299 (opens in new tab) (after a $20 rebate card), while the Radeon RX 6600 start at $229 (opens in new tab).

According to our GPU benchmarks hierarchy, those AMD cards come in just above and below the RTX 3060 in standard gaming performance. Then again, the RTX 3060 easily outclasses the 6650 XT in ray tracing games by around 30%, though Intel seems more confident in Arc's ray tracing prowess. XeSS and DLSS also need to factor into the equation, with DLSS having a lengthy head start in terms of adoption rates.

It's going to be an interesting end to 2022, in other words. Besides Arc GPUs finally arriving, Nvidia RTX 40-series Ada Lovelace GPUs and AMD RX 7000-series RDNA 3 GPUs are set to launch in the near future. All indications are that AMD and Nvidia are tackling the high-end and enthusiast performance segments first, meaning Intel should have several months to make a name for its Arc offerings in the budget and midrange markets.

We'll have the full A770 and A750 reviews ready in time for the official launch date, so check back then.

Jarred Walton is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware focusing on everything GPU. He has been working as a tech journalist since 2004, writing for AnandTech, Maximum PC, and PC Gamer. From the first S3 Virge '3D decelerators' to today's GPUs, Jarred keeps up with all the latest graphics trends and is the one to ask about game performance.

  • PiranhaTech
    Hopefully they can both get their drivers right, and help encourage Nvidia to drop their prices
    Reply
  • Blacksad999
    PiranhaTech said:
    Hopefully they can both get their drivers right, and help encourage Nvidia to drop their prices

    I see a lot of people say this. However, most of them just want Intel or AMD to underprice Nvidia not so that they can buy one of their cards, but so that they can then just ideally buy a cheaper Nvidia card. lol
    Reply
  • saunupe1911
    Wow the lack of full 48gb HDMI 2.1 is a huge let down! The HTPC and small form PC folks would have ate this up. Extremely missed opportunity. C'mon Intel!!!!
    Reply
  • thestryker
    saunupe1911 said:
    Wow the lack of full 48gb HDMI 2.1 is a huge let down! The HTPC and small form PC folks would have ate this up. Extremely missed opportunity. C'mon Intel!!!!
    It has 3x DP 2.0 ports (I believe all of the Intel Limited Edition GPUs have DP 2.0) on it AFAIK so there might be (likely expensive) an active adapter down the road which would do the trick. I do agree it'd be great if it had HDMI 2.1 as well, but I'm assuming they didn't have the spec ready when the silicon was originally done.
    Reply
  • waltc3
    Very good to mention that AMD makes GPUs, too--otherwise someone might think these Arcs can't compete with any AMD GPU. Sort of a bizarre oversight by Intel PR, imo. One day soon, I imagine, you'll get the green light to test them, and won't that be fun? I would imagine that Intel is hard at work trying to put its drivers into shape before the NDA lapses, which I imagine is why you can't test it right now. So many rumors about these GPUs, it's hard to separate the wheat from the chaff, so I'll be glad when you get the green light to test.
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    If the drivers are anything near as buggy as Intel's previous releases, write me.

    I'll send you, your favorite alcohol in empathy.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    Am I the only one still flabbergasted people are celebrating the emergence of what are essentially entry level gaming cards at over $300?
    Reply
  • Co BIY
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    Am I the only one still flabbergasted people are celebrating the emergence of what are essentially entry level gaming cards at over $300?
    While I sympathize with this sentiment . $300 isn't what it used to be.

    The 960 was $199 at release in 2015 - $1 in 2015 is $1.25 today. That puts the 960 MSRP at $250 today and inflation would account for half the price increase. Large performance increases in the new cards and diminishing returns to "Moore's Law" make these prices seem more reasonable.

    People are also celebrating a third entrant into the GPU marketplace. The market dynamics with three competitors is much better than with two.
    Reply
  • Warrior24_7
    PiranhaTech said:
    Hopefully they can both get their drivers right, and help encourage Nvidia to drop their prices

    Why? Are you spending over $800 on a card? Intel aimed these at the mainstream market.
    Reply
  • Warrior24_7
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    Am I the only one still flabbergasted people are celebrating the emergence of what are essentially entry level gaming cards at over $300?

    Yep, you are! This is where most people buy their GPUs. Everybody talks about the 4090 and 4090Ti like they’re buying one. The truth is, they’re not. They just complain about the price of one.
    Reply