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Arc A770M Beats GeForce RTX 3060 Mobile, According to Intel

Intel Arc
Intel Arc (Image credit: Intel)

Intel announced the company's Arc Alchemist mobile lineup back in March. The high-end Arc 7 A730M and A770M won't hit the U.S. market until summer, but they're already shipping in select laptops in China. In a new reviewer's guide, Intel claims that the A730M and A770M are faster than Nvidia's GeForce RTX 3050 Ti Mobile and RTX 3060 Mobile, respectively.

The A730M and the A770M are the top performers from the A-series mobile lineup. The discrete graphics cards feature Intel's ACM-G10 silicon baked with TSMC's 6nm process node. The A730M comes with 24 Xe cores, 24 ray tracing units, and a clock speed up to 1,100 MHz. The superior A770M has eight more Xe cores and ray tracing units while also enjoying a clock speed that hits 1,650 MHz. As a result, the A770M offers twice the compute performance as the A730M. There's also a significant gap in memory configuration between the A730M and A770M. The A730M has 12GB of GDDR6 memory across a 192-bit memory interface, whereas the A770M wields 16GB of GDDR6 and a 256-bit memory bus.

As always, we recommend you approach vendor benchmarks with caution. The disparity between the hardware for the four gaming laptops that Intel used in its tests is evident. The A730M pre-production unit features the latest Core i7-12700H, a 14-core Alder Lake-H chip, and 16GB of DDR5-4800. On the other hand, the GeForce RTX 3050 Ti Mobile belongs to the ROG Zephyrus M16, which has the previous octa-core Core i7-11800H Tiger Lake chip and 16GB of DDR4-3200 memory. More importantly, Asus' device uses the 60W version of the GeForce RTX 3050 Ti. For reference, there are 70W and 80W variants, so the one inside the ROG Zephyrus M16 isn't the best-performing SKU.

There's even a more notorious difference between the A770M and GeForce RTX 3060 Mobile machines. The A770M's pre-production laptop has a 14-core Core i9-12900HK, the flagship Alder Lake-H SKU, and 16GB of DDR5-4800 memory. The GeForce RTX 3060 Mobile emerges inside the MSI Pulse GL66, which has nearly the exact same specifications as the ROG Zephyrus M16. The GeForce RTX 3060 Mobile has a TGP range between 60W and 115W, and the MSI Pulse GL66 features the 85W variant.

Caveats on the discrepancies in test hardware notwithstanding, let's go ahead and hit the Intel-provided benchmarks.

Arc A730M, A770M Benchmarks

RTX 3050 TiArc A730MRTX 3060Arc A770M
17 Game Geometric Mean57.264.678.888.3
Assassin's Creed Valhalla (High)38507469
Borderlands 3 (Ultra)45506076
Control (High)42627089
Cyberpunk 2077 (Ultra)39495468
Death Stranding (Ultra)8987113102
Dirt 5 (High)64618387
F1 2021 (Ultra)688696123
Far Cry 6 (Ultra)63688082
Gears of War 5 (Ultra)58527273
Horizon Zero Dawn (Ultimate Quality)63508068
Metro Exodus (Ultra)39545369
Red Dead Redemption 2 (High)46606677
Strange Brigade (Ultra)98123134172
The Division 2 (Ultra)63517886
The Witcher 3 (Ultra)96101124141
Total War Saga: Troy (Ultra)48667186
Watch Dogs Legion (High)59717789

According to Intel's 1080p (1920x1080) results, the Arc A730M was up to 13% faster than the GeForce RTX 3050 Ti Mobile. Intel didn't specify the TGP for the A730M, so we can't put those numbers into perspective. We know that the A730M wiggles in between 80W and 120W, and the GeForce RTX 3050 Ti Mobile spans from 35W to 80W. Intel used the 60W SKU for comparison paired with a slower processor. Even then, the difference wasn't very substantial.

The Arc A770M, the flagship mobile Arc SKU, delivered up to 12% higher performance than the GeForce RTX 3060 Mobile. But again, the TGP for the A770M remains a mystery. As per Intel, the A770M sits between 120W and 150W. However, the GeForce RTX 3060 Mobile was at 85W and had the same last-generation processor as the GeForce RTX 3050 Ti Mobile. The GeForce RTX 3060 Mobile offers TGP limits between 60W and 115W, so the tested variant is basically at the halfway point.

The performance delta between the Alchemist and Ampere graphics cards was less than 15%. The margins would probably be lower if Intel had paired Ampere with identical processors like the Intel units and used the higher TGP versions. Perhaps, it may have even tipped the scales. Then again, that's the problem with vendor benchmarks. You can't trust them.

Overall, it's good to see that Intel might be able to deliver GeForce RTX 3060 Mobile levels of performance, and pricing will, of course, be a factor to consider. Intel offers AV1 encoding hardware, which you don't get on other GPUs right now, and it also has some synergies it can leverage when you pair an Arc GPU with an Intel 12th Generation Alder Lake CPU — things like Hyper Encode and Deep Link.

Drivers and gaming performance, meanwhile, seem like they'll fall toward the mainstream and budget sector, so hopefully, vendors will price laptops accordingly. The fact that Intel is doing all of the Arc GPUs, both mobile and desktop, as China first launches doesn't give us a lot of confidence either, but perhaps by the time the U.S. launch rolls around, more bugs will have been squashed.

Zhiye Liu
Zhiye Liu

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

  • KananX
    According to Intel they will also have a competitor to the 3080 and 3070, early 2022! 😂 I don’t even think it will happen this year.
    Reply
  • KyaraM
    KananX said:
    According to Intel they will also have a competitor to the 3080 and 3070, early 2022! 😂 I don’t even think it will happen this year.
    Last time I checked, they stated performance between the 3060ti and 3070, which seems about in line with the new claims right now?
    Reply
  • dalek1234
    "according to Intel" typically translates into "Not happening". Trusting what Intel says is like trusting what Poo-tin says.
    Reply
  • KananX
    KyaraM said:
    Last time I checked, they stated performance between the 3060ti and 3070, which seems about in line with the new claims right now?
    There were so many rumors and expectations were steadily adjusted so I don’t know anymore.😂 have to say, at this point it’s better they give up and free up the precious wafers for AMD/NV.
    Reply
  • KyaraM
    KananX said:
    There were so many rumors and expectations were steadily adjusted so I don’t know anymore.😂 have to say, at this point it’s better they give up and free up the precious wafers for AMD/NV.
    I don't want to have that. I want as many options to chose from as possible. Competition is healthy after all and I want another option than Invidia since I got burned by AMD cards to the point I'm not inclined to touch them again in the forseeable future.
    Reply
  • KananX
    KyaraM said:
    I don't want to have that. I want as many options to chose from as possible. Competition is healthy after all and I want another option than Invidia since I got burned by AMD cards to the point I'm not inclined to touch them again in the forseeable future.
    Oof that’s sad, AMD improved a lot, I think you should give them another chance instead of hoping for Intel to be good. I read a lot of consumer reviews on shopping sites, many people are happy with AMD and the drivers too.
    Reply
  • KyaraM
    KananX said:
    you should give them another chance
    No.
    Reply
  • gg83
    KyaraM said:
    No.
    Intel will be a full generation behind AMD/Nvidia when they finally hit the western markets.
    Reply
  • TerryLaze
    gg83 said:
    Intel will be a full generation behind AMD/Nvidia when they finally hit the western markets.
    No they won't, intel won't be competing against the new gen high end but against the older gens mid-high cards.
    They don't need to have a single win against the newest and biggest nvidia/amd cards, most of the market wants cheap GPUs and nvidia/amd alone can't provide enough of them.
    Intel's compute and AI cards will have to compete, if intel wants to make money, but those don't have to run games and at benchmarks arc is pretty good.
    Reply
  • KananX
    TerryLaze said:
    No they won't, intel won't be competing against the new gen high end but against the older gens mid-high cards.
    They don't need to have a single win against the newest and biggest nvidia/amd cards, most of the market wants cheap GPUs and nvidia/amd alone can't provide enough of them.
    Intel's compute and AI cards will have to compete, if intel wants to make money, but those don't have to run games and at benchmarks arc is pretty good.
    He is completely correct with what he said. Intel aspires to be competitive with Nvidia and AMD so what you say doesn’t make much sense. Competitive with the mid range only? So far didnt happen, and again you’re making no sense as new midrange is around the corner and Intel will not be competitive with the new midrange that will arrive this year or early next year.

    For a company like Intel it’s not their goal to be competitive with mid range only and that was formulated by members of Intel frequently, they had performance targets like 3070-3080 not 3060-3060 Ti level.
    Reply