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LG Debuts UltraGear 45-Inch 240Hz Curved OLED Gaming Monitor

LG monitors at IFA 2022
(Image credit: LG)

LG showcased a huge ultra-wide gaming monitor at IFA 2022 in Berlin today. The new LG UltarGear OLED gaming monitor (model 45GR95QE) features a 45-inch diagonal 3440 x 1440 pixels display with a 240 Hz max refresh rate and 0.1 ms response time. It is designed to fully immerse gamers with its accurate and wide color gamut and its viewer-encapsulating 800R curvature.

(Image credit: LG)

The new LG UltraGear 45GR95QE is the company’s first monitor to be released using a 45-inch OLED display panel and the first featuring 800R curvature. However, if you are feeling some déjà vu, LG’s monitor appears to be employing the same ‘LG Display’ flexible OLED panel that enabled the physically flexing Corsair Xeneon Flex 45WQHD240 OLED gaming monitor we reported on yesterday. The critical difference is LG has decided on a fixed 800R curvature, and the Corsair leaves the degree of screen curve up to the user (between totally flat and approx 800R). Perhaps LG wasn’t happy with the creaky Corsair flexing mechanism, which doesn’t create a true arc, but rather a display with two flat sides plus a bend in the middle.

Like the Corsair, this ultra-wide LG OLED gaming monitor has excellent gaming performance and punchy color reproduction. In addition to sustaining the headlining 240 Hz max refresh rate, this monitor can sync with your graphics card (VRR) for smooth action as frame rates dip. Check the table at the bottom of this article for a complete set of essential specs.

Another interesting monitor LG had on display at IFA 2022 was the UltraFine Display Ergo AI (model 32UQ890), pictured below. This is a high quality 31.5-inch 4K (3840 x 2160) IPS display with 95% coverage of DCI-P3. However, its party trick is hinted at by the ‘AI’ in its name.

(Image credit: LG)

This monitor supports three AI-driven ergonomic enhancement modes: AI Motion, Continuous Motion and Periodic Motion. AI Motion, which was demonstrated at LG’s booth during IFA, tracks the user’s eye level and adjusts screen height and tilt via its powered articulated desk-mounted arm whenever a change is detected.

UltraGear OLED Gaming Monitor

(45GR95QE)

UltraFine Display Ergo AI

(32UQ890)

Display Type

OLED (AGLR)

IPS

Screen Size

45-inch

31.5-inch

Resolution

WQHD (3,440 x 1,440)

UHD (3,840 x 2,160)

Color Gamut

DCI-P3 98.5%

DCI-P3 95%

Contrast Ratio

1,000,000:1

1,000:1

Refresh Rate

240Hz

60Hz

Response Time

0.1ms GTG

5ms GTG

Curvature

800R

N/A

HDR

HDR10

HDR10

Connectivity

HDMI 2.1 x 2 DisplayPort 1.4 x 1USB 3.0 x 1 Upstream x 2 Downstream 4pole H/P out (DTS HP:X)HDMI x 1 DisplayPort 1.4 x 1 USB 3.0 x 1 Upstream x 2 Downstream 3 pole H/P out

Speaker

N/A

5W x 2 (MaxxAudio)

Remote Controller

Yes

Yes

Stand

Tilt: -2º to +15º (Manual) Height: 110mm (Auto) Swivel: ±10º Pivot: Not AvailableTilt: -20º to 20º (Auto/Manual) Height: 160mm (Auto/Manual) Swivel: ±270º (Manual) Pivot: Not Available Extend/Retract: 300mm

LG hasn’t shared pricing or availability dates for the UltraGear 45GR95QE or UltraFine 32UQ890 monitors.

Mark Tyson
Freelance News Writer

Mark Tyson is a Freelance News Writer at Tom's Hardware US. He enjoys covering the full breadth of PC tech; from business and semiconductor design to products approaching the edge of reason.

  • drivinfast247
    This thing is badass! Was just about to pull the trigger on the 42" LG OLED. Gonna wait and check it out. Might not like it so wide.
    Reply
  • Makaveli
    No thank you.

    3440x1440 at 45" will be like 82 PPI

    Where as a 34 Ultrawide gives you 109 PPI so text will look terrible on that.

    This monitor should have had 3840x1600 res which is what 38" ultrawides use.

    800R curve is very aggressive also a no for me dawg.
    Reply
  • jeremyj_83
    Makaveli said:
    No thank you.

    3440x1440 at 45" will be like 82 PPI

    Where as a 34 Ultrawide gives you 109 PPI so text will look terrible on that.

    This monitor should have had 3840x1600 res which is what 38" ultrawides use.

    800R curve is very aggressive also a no for me dawg.
    I would say this monitor should be 4096x2160.
    Reply
  • drivinfast247
    Makaveli said:
    No thank you.

    3440x1440 at 45" will be like 82 PPI

    Where as a 34 Ultrawide gives you 109 PPI so text will look terrible on that.

    This monitor should have had 3840x1600 res which is what 38" ultrawides use.

    800R curve is very aggressive also a no for me dawg.
    You do know you can change the flex rate, right? I do agree about the lack of resolution, though. I still think the 42" 4k oled will be nice. I have the 55" c1 and it's an amazing monitor just too big for comfortable desktop use.
    Reply
  • Makaveli
    drivinfast247 said:
    You do know you can change the flex rate, right? I do agree about the lack of resolution, though. I still think the 42" 4k oled will be nice. I have the 55" c1 and it's an amazing monitor just too big for comfortable desktop use.

    "The critical difference is LG has decided on a fixed 800R curvature, and the Corsair leaves the degree of screen curve up to the user (between totally flat and approx 800R). Perhaps LG wasn’t happy with the creaky Corsair flexing mechanism, which doesn’t create a true arc, but rather a display with two flat sides plus a bend in the middle."
    On the Corsair model sure not on this LG its fixed as per the article.
    Reply
  • drivinfast247
    Makaveli said:
    "The critical difference is LG has decided on a fixed 800R curvature, and the Corsair leaves the degree of screen curve up to the user (between totally flat and approx 800R). Perhaps LG wasn’t happy with the creaky Corsair flexing mechanism, which doesn’t create a true arc, but rather a display with two flat sides plus a bend in the middle."
    On the Corsair model sure not on this LG its fixed as per the article.
    I apparently cannot read or comprehend anything. I thought this was the article for the Corsair model.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    Makaveli said:
    "The critical difference is LG has decided on a fixed 800R curvature, and the Corsair leaves the degree of screen curve up to the user (between totally flat and approx 800R). Perhaps LG wasn’t happy with the creaky Corsair flexing mechanism, which doesn’t create a true arc, but rather a display with two flat sides plus a bend in the middle."
    On the Corsair model sure not on this LG its fixed as per the article.
    Both solutions don't appeal to me. Flexible screen sounds nice, but I feel it is more marketing than it being really useful since not many people will keep changing the degree of curve. LG's solution however is too curved. While Alienware's QD OLED monitor is not a direct comparison to these 2, I think the fixed curve and size works best.
    Reply