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Corsair Reveals Bendable OLED Ultrawide Gaming Monitor

XENEON FLEX 45WQHD240 OLED Gaming Monitor
(Image credit: Corsair)

Curved gaming monitors are nothing new, but out of no where, Corsair has revealed a new curved gaming ultrawide with a unique quirk. Known as the Xeneon Flex 45WQHD240 OLED, (opens in new tab) this new monitor is a 45 inch 3440 x 1440 240Hz ultrawide featuring an OLED panel from LG. But the quirk is its ability to bend into a curved state. 

For the uninitiated, OLED is the first and only current panel technology that allows for screen bending. We've already seen this with Samsung's Z flip series of devices, featuring OLED panels with foldable displays. Now with Corsair and its partnership with LG Displays, we are starting to see this ability make its way into ultrawide gaming monitors as well.

The curve on the Xeneon Flex is user adjustable to a maximum curvature of 800R. Alternatively you can also keep the monitor perfectly flat, for productivity tasks such as photo or video editing. Adjustments work with handles on each side of the monitor.

Xeneon Flex 45WQHD240 OLED Gaming Monitor

(Image credit: Corsair)

The OLED in the Xeneon is a LG W-OLED panel, featuring some super impressive specifications. Grey to Grey response times can be measured in the microsecond range with a 0.03 milliseconds response time, and a 0.01millisecond pixel on and off time at a 240Hz refresh rate. The panel also comes with Nvidia G-Sync and AMD FreeSync Premium compatibility.

The panel features a 1000 nit peak brightness, and is optimal for viewing HDR content in games or videos/movies. Combine this with the inky blacks from the OLED's self lit pixels, and you should have one of the most vibrant looking gaming panels on the market.

As a result of the curve, all rear I/O has been moved to the base, and features DisplayPort and HDMI outputs. There is also a front I/O featuring USB 3 ports and a audio jack.

It will be very interesting to see how the gaming market reacts to Corsair's Xeneon Flex monitor. Its something gamers haven't really asked for, but it could be a very useful feature down the road as OLED becomes more mainstream. For more details, check out YouTuber's Paul's Hardware and Bitwit's coverage on the new display.

We don't know full details on the monitor, except for a possible early 2023 release date (via Paul's Hardware), but Corsair has announced it will be sharing final details including, more detailed launch dates, availability and final specs later this year.

Aaron Klotz
Freelance News Writer

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • oofdragon
    WOW now that's real flexing, not the marketing cp asus and acer have come up with lately. Thats the right direction.. making gaming monitors the natural upgrade to tvs, not the other way around
    Reply
  • Colif
    Can anyone think of an actual user case for a monitor that can do this though?

    I mean, if you want a curved monitor, just buy one.

    Is this them selling us a cost saving exercise as a benefit? If they only have to make one type of monitor, it sure would be cheaper.

    Curious about long term effects are of constant bending/undending it.

    I am not against bendy screens, it makes sense on mobiles and laptops, but on a desktop?
    Reply
  • paracord77
    Colif said:
    Can anyone think of an actual user case for a monitor that can do this though?

    I mean, if you want a curved monitor, just buy one.

    Is this them selling us a cost saving exercise as a benefit? If they only have to make one type of monitor, it sure would be cheaper.

    Curious about long term effects are of constant bending/undending it.

    I am not against bendy screens, it makes sense on mobiles and laptops, but on a desktop?

    It can be useful if you want to play coop with friend or family. You make it flat and it gives them much better viewing angles.

    Btw you need flat screen for AutoCAD and similar software. You need straight lines on your screen. But what if you're also a gamer and want curved screen for more immersive experience.
    Reply
  • ien2222
    Colif said:
    Can anyone think of an actual user case for a monitor that can do this though?

    I mean, if you want a curved monitor, just buy one.

    Is this them selling us a cost saving exercise as a benefit? If they only have to make one type of monitor, it sure would be cheaper.

    Curious about long term effects are of constant bending/undending it.

    I am not against bendy screens, it makes sense on mobiles and laptops, but on a desktop?

    In addition to the above post, if they make the curvature settable, this would be fantastic. Personally I don't like the severeness of curves for most of the monitors today and this one is supposed to be 800R (eek), if I was able to set my own curve for whatever application I happen to be doing at the time, that really is a game changer. Flat for office work (any curve just messes with my vision a bit especially Excel), 2000R-5000R for most gaming with a few titles below 2000R.
    Reply
  • DotNetMaster777
    OLED is really flex !
    Reply