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Ryzen 7 7700X Edges Past Core i9-12900K In New Benchmark

Ryzen 7000
Ryzen 7000 (Image credit: AMD)

AMD's Ryzen 7000 (Raphael) processors with Zen 4 cores will hit the retail market on September 27. However, someone got their hands on a retail Ryzen 7 7700X and put the octa-core chip through its paces in CPU-Z.

The Ryzen 7 7700X submission is no longer available (opens in new tab), but lucky for us, hardware detective Tum_Apisak (opens in new tab) has grabbed screenshots of the results. The Ryzen 7 7700X bested the Core i5-12600K by 1% in single-threaded performance. It couldn't catch up to the Core i7-12700K, though. If we compare the Zen 4 chip to AMD's stack, the Ryzen 7 7700X outperformed the Ryzen 7 5800X by 21% and the Ryzen 9 5950X by 20%.

Regarding multi-threaded performance, the Ryzen 7 7700X  jumped ahead of the Core i9-12900K by 1%. The Zen 4 processor showed an 8% lead over the Core i7-12700K. However, compared to the Ryzen 7 5800X, the upcoming Ryzen 7 7700X outpaced it by a 28% delta in multi-threaded performance.

According to the CPU-Z listing, the Ryzen 7 7700X hit 5,425 MHz, which is the boost clock speed for the Zen 4 chip. The user tested the octa-core processor on Gigabyte's X670E Aorus Master motherboard and DDR5-6400 C30 memory.

Preliminary benchmarks have revealed that Zen 4 has a promising future. For example, the Ryzen 7 7700X reportedly delivered 32% higher performance than the Ryzen 7 5800X in Cinebench R20. Nonetheless, we still recommend waiting for the official reviews since you can't measure a processor's performance based on a couple of benchmarks.

The Ryzen 7 7700X will arrive on the shelves for $399. For comparison, the Ryzen 7 5800X and Ryzen 7 5700X debuted at $449 and $299, respectively. The Zen 4 part is 13% cheaper than the Ryzen 7 5800X but 33% more expensive than the Ryzen 7 5700X, which it's directly replacing. Furthermore, you'll have to factor in a new AM5 motherboard and premium DDR5 memory that may bring the platform cost around the $800 mark.

Zhiye Liu
RAM Reviewer and News Editor

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

  • jkflipflop98
    So their still unreleased part is still slower on a per-core level than the current Intel lineup? Nice work guys.
    Reply
  • fevanson
    Upgrading from a 2700x to a 5800x is aging like fine wine, if a 7700x can't even beat alder lake in single core.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    I feel there is no need to rely on these grey benchmark results now. The chips will officially be available soon and we should just stick with more transparent testing results. But the sense is that Zen 4 is going to be competitive to Raptor Lake. Ultimately, I guess it just boils down to cost or whether people are looking for upgradability. I guess outgoing platforms like the Intel 600 series chipset is likely going to be cheaper and allows the use of DDR4 (which lowers cost), but it also seems that Raptor Lake is going to be the last CPU that uses LGA1700.
    Reply
  • tennis2
    6400 CL30 is blazing fast for DDR5. Were the Intel tests conducted with that same RAM? I doubt it. If so, this is an absolute best case scenario for the 7700X.
    Reply
  • LuxZg
    watzupken said:
    I feel there is no need to rely on these grey benchmark results now. The chips will officially be available soon and we should just stick with more transparent testing results. But the sense is that Zen 4 is going to be competitive to Raptor Lake. Ultimately, I guess it just boils down to cost or whether people are looking for upgradability. I guess outgoing platforms like the Intel 600 series chipset is likely going to be cheaper and allows the use of DDR4 (which lowers cost), but it also seems that Raptor Lake is going to be the last CPU that uses LGA1700.

    I feel the same. For people that are buying all-new and plan to upgrade in a couple years, AMD will be preferable due to AM5. For people upgrading with current LGA1700 setup Intel will be obvious choice. For everyone else it will be mostly personal preference or what the sales person throws at them. I expect new systems with comparable specs & features (PCIe 5.0, DDR5, ...) to both cost and perform close enough that most people won't notice or care.
    Reply
  • hotaru251
    jkflipflop98 said:
    So their still unreleased part is still slower on a per-core level than the current Intel lineup? Nice work guys.
    tbf AM5 likely have bugs like AM4 had.c (its nto a ryzen cpu if it doesnt have buggy bios at launch)

    so performance prolly do better over time.
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    I can see some in here don't understand how the CPU-Z benchmark works...

    Regards.
    Reply
  • Tugrul_512bit
    Certainly better than my FX8150 that can run at 2.1GHz.
    Reply
  • KyaraM
    LuxZg said:
    I feel the same. For people that are buying all-new and plan to upgrade in a couple years, AMD will be preferable due to AM5. For people upgrading with current LGA1700 setup Intel will be obvious choice. For everyone else it will be mostly personal preference or what the sales person throws at them. I expect new systems with comparable specs & features (PCIe 5.0, DDR5, ...) to both cost and perform close enough that most people won't notice or care.
    And be unable to make full use out of your chip, as with Ryzen? I'm sorry, but to me it just doesn't make sense to slap a brand new CPU on a 5 year old board. It might for people with tighter budgets, but let's be frank here. Those people won't be able to afford dropping 800-1000 bucks on CPU, MB, and RAM at the same time initially, or even more. DDR5 is still overpriced, the CPUs cost quite a bit as well, and the MBs won't be cheap, either. And at the lower end, the boards might not even be able to support newer chips like with the current socket.

    It's a nice feature in theory, but nothing more to me.
    Reply
  • teodoreh
    For those who can't understand:
    i9-12900K is the top Intel processor with 8 Performance and 8 Efficiency cores (16 in total) at 125W TDP and 241W MTP
    Ryzen 7 7700X is the 3rd strongest processor of Zen4 lineup with only 8 cores (all performance) at 105W TDP

    I am not even mentioning the pricing of the processor or the motherboard.
    Just remember that the stronger AMD processor is the 7950X with 16 cores and 170W TDP and believe me, the top i9-12900K doesn't stand a chance against it...
    Reply