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Team Group Reveals New DDR5 Modules

Team Group's DDR5 modules
(Image credit: Team Group)

Team Group has announced (opens in new tab) the launch of some updated RAM Modules in its Elite range, bringing DDR5 speeds to its range of DIMMs for desktop and laptop use. There's both SO-DIMMs and U-DIMMs available, for desktop and laptop use.

Team Group's DDR5 modules

(Image credit: Team Group)

Running at a respectable 5600 MHz (we have yet to discover what their CL timings will be, though the lack of ostentatious heat spreaders suggests it will be quite ordinary) and with an operating voltage of 1.1V (again, not unusual) the modules could, Team Group claims, ‘[extend] the life of computers it is installed on’. DDR5 features such as same-bank refresh and optimized circuit structure are supported, and Team Group thinks they’ll be excellent for multitasking.

Team Group already has one set of DIMMs - DDR4 in this case - in our big list of the best RAM (opens in new tab) for 2022, and the 5600MHz speed of this DDR5 puts it ahead of the Samsung DDR5-4800 (opens in new tab) currently sitting in second place. It can’t outstrip the G.Skill Trident DDR5 (opens in new tab) that’s holding down the first place spot, however, as this hits the DDR5-6000 spec. 

Those CL timings will be crucial for getting a good place on the list, as the G.Skill is extremely tight at CL36, while the Samsung languishes at a relatively sedate CL40 yet has excellent overclocking potential. The lack of obvious heat spreaders on Team Group’s new modules, again, makes us wonder about its overclocking abilities, though it’s possible the company has simply chosen to supply images of its naked chips, and the retail units will be replete with all sorts of aluminum fins and other passive cooling devices. The Samsung chips are, likewise, thrust rudely from the circuit boards’ surface with nothing to adorn them, so there's always hope.

First seeing release as 16GB modules, we expect to see a wider range of capacities from at least 8GB to 32GB once the range has established itself, and hopefully up to the DDR5 maximum of 128GB on a single stick. 

Retail pricing also joins the list of things we don’t know about these RAM modules, though they should be available on Amazon (no other retailers are mentioned) near the end of this month.

Ian Evenden
Ian Evenden

Ian Evenden is a UK-based news writer for Tom’s Hardware US. He’ll write about anything, but stories about Raspberry Pi and DIY robots seem to find their way to him.

  • BX4096
    First seeing release as 16GB modules, we expect to see a wider range of capacities from at least 8GB to 32GB once the range has established itself, and hopefully up to the DDR5 maximum of 128GB on a single stick.

    Sadly, the press release only mentions "modules from 8GB to 32GB capacities to choose from". Which is my biggest issue with DDR5: so far it offers the exact same capacities as its predecessor, except for at much higher prices. I've already had 128GB of DDR4 RAM (8x16GB) since ~2015, so naturally I'm not very enthusiastic about upgrading until either the prices drop drastically or they finally start selling 64GB sticks. I'd much prefer to upgrade with 2x64GB and later expand from there, especially since 8-slot HEDT motherboards seem to have died out since my last purchase.
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