AMD's upcoming Ryzen AI 9 HX 370 beats the company's current best mobile chip – Strix Point ES Geekbench results show big improvements

AMD Ryzen AI 300 Series Official Graphic
(Image credit: AMD)

The Ryzen AI 300 series still has a few weeks until its release, but new Geekbench scores bode well for the chips. Two new engineering samples of the Ryzen AI 9 HX 370 APU were found on Geekbench today, reaching scores beating the highest-end Zen 4 mobile processors, and running at their full speed.

The last time Strix Point (AMD's codename for the upcoming Ryzen AI 300 series) was seen in Geekbench leaks, it turned in impressive test scores but was running in Silent Mode. This power-saving meant the chip only reached a core clock of 3.67 GHz, well shy of its recorded boost clock of 4.2 GHz. Today's test scores let the processor fully loose, with two chips hitting 4.5 and 4.8 GHz. The 4.5 GHz chip still holds the outdated "Ryzen AI 9 HX 170" name for the 370, while the other is an unnamed engineering sample. 

As in our previous coverage, below is a table of the Ryzen AI 9 HX 370's best result in this latest batch of results (the 4.5 GHz test) compared with the June 7th results, as well as its predecessor, the Ryzen 9 8945HS, and AMD's fastest available mobile processor, the Ryzen 9 7945HX3D

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CPUsSingle CoreMulti Core
Ryzen AI 9 HX 370 12-core (June 24th))2,83314,773
Ryzen AI 9 HX 170 12-core (June 7th)2,54414,158
Ryzen 9 8945HS 8-core2,38011,775
Ryzen 9 7945HX3D 16-core2,82016,460

In just the two weeks between the Silent Mode benchmark and today's results, Strix Point has seen some improvement. Turning off Silent Mode and likely some level of driver optimization and development contributed to an 11% jump in single-core scores and a 4% gain in multi-core. With an expected due date of July 15th, AMD and its OEM partners are likely to continue optimizing performance until better results are unlocked alongside the retail launch of the 300 series. 

As expected from a generational leap, the HX 370 soundly beats the 8945HS, giving a 19% increase in single-core performance and a 25% boost in multi-core. This is more in line with the 16% improvement in IPC between Zen 4 and Zen 5 CPU architecture that AMD has been advertising. 

More impressively, the Ryzen AI 9 HX 370's single-core results squeezed past the Ryzen 9 7945HX3D, beating its 2,820 score with a 2,833. This is a bit of a shock, considering the 7945HX3D contains AMD's 3D V-Cache technology, which powers AMD's best CPUs for desktops ( for more on 3D V-Cache, see our explainer) and Dragon Range's higher TDP over Strix Point. What's unsurprising is the 7945HX3D's 11% lead in multi-core testing, thanks to its four additional cores. 

Geekbench GPU results also popped up today for the integrated graphics within the Ryzen AI 9 HX 370 APU, though the Radeon 880M is named rather than the 890M which is confirmed to be in the HX 370. Results in Geekbench 6's OpenCL and Vulkan tests are in line with what we reported last week on the Radeon chip's early TimeSpy results. With a Vulkan test score of 33,849, the "880M" falls in line with the performance of discrete GPUs like the GTX 1650 Max-Q (34,169) and beats Intel's desktop Arc A380 (31,766). 

We would assume that the integrated graphics were listed incorrectly in the Geekbench tests, as the HX 370 has the Radeon 890M inside, but engineering sample weirdness or some other problem could be to blame. The RDNA 3.5-based Radeon 890M GPU has 16 compute units, which allows it to soundly beat its predecessor, the Radeon 780M. 

AMD's Strix Point gets better every time we see it. Even with a confusing last-minute name change from the 100-series to 300-series to have a bigger number than Intel, the benchmark results it turns in are good enough to forgive AMD's clout chasing. The Ryzen AI 9 HX 370 will reportedly be released in laptops starting July 15th. And if launch performance is anything like what we're seeing today, it should be a big win for AMD over Intel in the laptop market in both graphics and processing power.

Dallin Grimm
Contributing Writer

Dallin Grimm is a contributing writer for Tom's Hardware. He has been building and breaking computers since 2017, serving as the resident youngster at Tom's. From APUs to RGB, Dallin has a handle on all the latest tech news. 

  • nogames
    In unexpected news.....
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    Here is another GB6 entry, ASUS TUF Gaming A14 laptop.

    https://cdn.wccftech.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/AMD-Ryzen-AI-9-HX-370-Zen-5-Strix-Point-APU-Benchmark-Leak-_2-964x1456.png

    Today's test scores let the processor fully loose, with two chips hitting 4.5 and 4.8 GHz.

    But if you check the log file, the chip reached a maximum core clock close to 5.0 GHz, on one of the benchmarks.
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    Geekbench GPU results also popped up today for the integrated graphics within the Ryzen AI 9 HX 370 APU, though the Radeon 880M is named rather than the 890M which is confirmed to be in the HX 370.

    We would assume that the integrated graphics were listed incorrectly in the Geekbench tests, as the HX 370 has the Radeon 890M inside, but engineering sample weirdness or some other problem could be to blame. The RDNA 3.5-based Radeon 890M GPU has 16 compute units, which allows it to soundly beat its predecessor, the Radeon 780M.

    Please check the entry again, the SKU name is shown with the older nomenclature i.e., "AMD Ryzen AI 9 HX 170", before AMD made the last minute change.

    There is no weirdness here, LOL.

    AMD also made a last minute change to the iGPU as well, that's why benchmark reads it as the 880M instead. And, the 880M igpu was also earlier dubbed as "870M" instead.

    The benchmark does NOT read it as the new Ryzen AI 9 HX 370, hence the 880M shows up there.

    A last minute change was made by AMD, and also at Computex most of the companies were showcasing prototype Laptops running early samples of this APU. Even the Ryzen AI 9 365 was previously codenamed as "Ryzen AI 9 165" sporting the 870M igpu.

    https://i.imgur.com/gSTX01f.jpeg
    Reply
  • TechyIT223
    It's kind of odd to also change the igpu number as well, cause this makes no sense.

    For the APU side it obviously makes sense to go for the 300 series nomenclature to stay ahead of Intel's Arrow Lake series. But integrated graphics model number should have remained the same IMO.
    Reply
  • KnightShadey
    TechyIT223 said:
    It's kind of odd to also change the igpu number as well, cause this makes no sense.

    For the APU side it obviously makes sense to go for the 300 series nomenclature to stay ahead of Intel's Arrow Lake series. But integrated graphics model number should have remained the same IMO.

    Except for intel's iGPU naming scheme is also similar so AMD R780M > UHD770 , but the only naming I've seen for Arc 8 core is a longer 3 grouping Identifier so not sure if they were aiming for R880/890M being ahead of UHD880 (as the past would indicate) or just boost8ng the name +1+1+0? 🤷🏻‍♂️

    It does make me wonder if they change the naming strategy for StrixHalo which looks like an enormous leap, does it become R899M or R9??M or do they start another category for a mid-desktop level performance ; something ala Radeon 9700 pro refresh naming to R x800, do the same to mobile to something like Radeon X???M or does that confuse it with older mobile parts like the X700M etc ? 🤔
    Reply
  • TechyIT223
    With Strix Halo they'll have to use a different nomenclature for the igpu to avoid any confusion.
    Reply
  • KnightShadey
    TechyIT223 said:
    With Strix Halo they'll have to use a different nomenclature for the igpu to avoid any confusion.
    I would hope so, but as we're seen from AMD, intel, and Micro$oft's naming teams... there's lotsa people there that aren't very good at their jobs, so they could easily mess this up too, just like the Pro confusion above.
    There seems to be obvious options, but all the better to bungle it. 🤔🤣
    Reply
  • thestryker
    TechyIT223 said:
    It's kind of odd to also change the igpu number as well, cause this makes no sense.

    For the APU side it obviously makes sense to go for the 300 series nomenclature to stay ahead of Intel's Arrow Lake series. But integrated graphics model number should have remained the same IMO.
    I think the logic (if there is any) is that the 680M/780M were both 12CU so now the 880M is also 12CU and we now have an 890M at 16CU. The naming honestly is just ridiculous and all a game as there was really no reason to shift any of it APU or IGP.
    Reply
  • TechyIT223
    KnightShadey said:
    I would hope so, but as we're seen from AMD, intel, and Micro$oft's naming teams... there's lotsa people there that aren't very good at their jobs, so they could easily mess this up too, just like the Pro confusion above.
    There seems to be obvious options, but all the better to bungle it. 🤔🤣

    LoL. Fire them from their jobs 😁
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    And even 870M igpu was sporting 12 CUs, so there is some logic to rename it as the "880M" as well.


    An early engineering sample of Ryzen AI 9 365/165 was spotted running within the Acer Swift SF14-61 laptop. Chip scored 2730 points in single-core and 13,032 points in the multi-core tests.

    It peaked out at 4414 MHz which is much lower than its official 5.0 GHz boost clock.

    https://cdn.wccftech.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/AMD-Ryzen-AI-7-365-Strix-Point-APU-Benchmark-Leak.png
    Reply