TeamGroup's LPDDR5X CAMM2 memory modules become the third consumer option for the new space-saving RAM standard — also tosses Expert AI branding in for good measure

Team Group's first LPDDR5X CAMM2 memory module.
(Image credit: Team Group)

TeamGroup has introduced its T-Create Expert AI series LPDDR5X CAMM2 memory modules (as well as many other new memory and storage products) ahead of Computex 2024

The headlining new RAM modules come in LPDDR5X-7200 and LPDDR5X-6400 speeds, with CL28/CL24 latencies, in 32GB/64GB capacities. The company stresses the benefits of its fast new memory modules in generative AI applications, as they are tailored for high-speed computing. 

With its Computex launch, TeamGroup becomes just the third memory maker to market CAMM2 memory modules, and like Crucial (which is owned by Micron), it is banking on consumers lapping up high-speed memory to speed AI processing. The company emphasized the importance of delivering an optimal experience in the space-saving CAMM2 form factor. 

TeamGroup is using its own LPDDR5X IC classification and verification process and will provide LPDDR5X-7500 and LPDDR5X-6400 modules delivering 60 GB/s and 51.2 GB/s bandwidth, with CL28 and CL24 latency speeds, respectively. Additionally, it uses ultra-thin graphene heatsinks to help with heat dissipation.

Unfortunately, TeamGroup did not reveal pricing for its CAMM2 modules. But early adoption with such technology always comes at a premium, such is the case with the Crucial-made 32GB and 64GB modules priced at $179.99 and $329.99, respectively. Like any newly released memory module, they should reduce in price eventually, while introducing higher memory capacities and speeds with lowered latencies.

CAMM2 memory modules are primarily made to replace the SO-DIMM form factor for notebooks, though we can't rule out them being adopted by other PC form factors. Lenovo is the first notebook maker ready for CAMM2 modules with its ThinkPad P1 Gen 7. With Computex 2024 just days away, we should see a plethora of upcoming notebooks using this standard. 

Adoption on other computing form factors

Apart from its size advantage, its ability to provide 1.3x more bandwidth compared to standard DDR5 modules at JEDEC speeds, and lowered power consumption, could make CAMM2 an excellent addition to desktops, mini PCs, and maybe handheld devices. This is the case with MSI and Kingston, who showed off Fury Impact DDR5 CAMM2 modules on the MSI Z790 Project Zero Plus motherboard - a BTF board that hides its connectors and certain components on the reverse side of the PCB. There will likely be many other memory makers showing CAMM2 modules, possibly also from Crucial who is the first to introduce DDR5-based CAMM2 memory in the market, followed by Samsung Electronics whose executive vice president of memory product planning said this form factor is set to gain wide adoption in PCs, laptops and data centers.

CAMM2 modules are likely to be adopted quicker than previous new memory form factors, as these are more compact while providing higher bandwidth - yet retain the ability to be user-fitted for repairs and upgrades.

Freelance News Writer

Roshan Ashraf Shaikh has been in the Indian PC hardware community since the early 2000s and has been building PCs, contributing to many Indian tech forums, & blogs. He operated Hardware BBQ for 11 years and wrote news for eTeknix & TweakTown before joining Tom's Hardware team. Besides tech, he is interested in fighting games, movies, anime, and mechanical watches.

  • mac_angel
    I'm not sure I follow the benefits, specifically for a desktop. I get they are space saving, but most desktops don't have that issue since the CPU usually needs a large cooler.
    The 1.3 times more bandwidth at JEDEC speeds, does that mean 7200 DDR5 XMP vs their 7200 LPDDR5X? That would make quite a difference.
    Reply
  • pixelpusher220
    mac_angel said:
    I'm not sure I follow the benefits, specifically for a desktop. I get they are space saving, but most desktops don't have that issue since the CPU usually needs a large cooler.
    The 1.3 times more bandwidth at JEDEC speeds, does that mean 7200 DDR5 XMP vs their 7200 LPDDR5X? That would make quite a difference.
    'regular' memory can block some air coolers. These lay flat, so as long as the mobo has the real estate for that, that's one advantage.

    I'd think flat would be easier to apply heat sinks to as well (to the point of conflicting with the air cooler anyway)
    Reply
  • Eximo
    mac_angel said:
    I'm not sure I follow the benefits, specifically for a desktop. I get they are space saving, but most desktops don't have that issue since the CPU usually needs a large cooler.
    The 1.3 times more bandwidth at JEDEC speeds, does that mean 7200 DDR5 XMP vs their 7200 LPDDR5X? That would make quite a difference.

    Yes, stock speed. They are talking speeds up to 8533. So there is potential for there to be DDR5 10,000 or something with XMP once this gets rolling. Of course that is likely to be on the tail end of DDR5 production.
    Reply
  • karserasl
    Well, you have to look further ahead.
    You keep thinking in todays MBs layout.
    These can be used on the back of the motherboard for example.
    Reply
  • Amdlova
    They can use it on graphics :) update your gpu take your ram to another card
    Reply