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BenQ PD2710QC QHD/IPS Designer Monitor Review

Grayscale, Gamma & Color

Testing the PD2710QC’s color accuracy is an almost boring exercise. From the first measurements, we can clearly see that it’s intended to be ready for work without calibration. All that’s missing is a data sheet, but this monitor easily competes with others that are certified and that cost more.

Grayscale Tracking

Our grayscale and gamma tests are described in detail here.

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We’ve included charts for Standard (the default mode), sRGB, and User pre-calibration. You can see that they are virtually identical. And the not-pictured Rec.709 chart is much the same. You won’t see any errors here, but our i1 Pro indicates a slight warmth to the grayscale steps.

Since there are RGB sliders available in the User mode, we tweaked them for an even better result. With all errors under 1dE, tracking is essentially perfect. The PD2710QC is not inexpensive, but you clearly get what you pay for here.

Comparisons

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The PD2710QC easily bests the competition in out-of-box accuracy. A 1.97 score puts it on par with professional, factory-calibrated displays. While not strictly part of that category, it easily qualifies for use as a proofing monitor. After calibration, the field tightens up quite a bit, but with only .97dE separating first from last you’d be hard-pressed to tell which screen was which.

Gamma Response

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Gamma is so important to color accuracy across the entire gamut, and the PD2710QC nails this metric. The only aberration we observed was in sRGB mode, where there is a drop (too bright) at 10% and a tiny rise at 90%. These are minor errors and can be fixed by simply selecting Standard or User. Calibration doesn’t affect the result at all as long as you stick with preset 3. The others will move the tracking either up or down, so if you want 2.4 or 1.8, that option is available.

Comparisons

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None of the screens here have gamma problems, but the PD2710QC runs away from the competition. With a super tight .04 value range and only a .45% deviation from 2.2, it’s one of the best displays we’ve ever measured in this test. Its closest match is the Dell S2718D with AOC not far behind. As you’re about to see, great gamma tracking leads to better results in our gamut tests.

Color Gamut & Luminance

For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, please click here.

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Our build-up may have portrayed the PD2710QC as having perfect color, and it nearly does, but there are few tiny flaws to point out. The red primary is slightly over-saturated unless you select the sRGB option, which pulls back the inner targets a little. Blue is under-saturated until a calibration is performed, after which it tracks almost perfectly. Green seems to line up well in all cases. Honestly, these are tiny differences, and even the sharpest eyes will have difficulty choosing between Standard, sRGB, Rec.709, and the calibrated User mode. Our only goal with adjustment is to realize any possible gain, no matter how small. The PD3200U we reviewed back in March measured better before calibration, but the PD2710QC did pick up a few tiny improvements from our changes. In all cases, luminance levels are right at the neutral balance point except for blue, which ramps up a bit to compensate for its under-saturation. The final numbers are impressive.

Comparisons

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Straight out of the box, the PD2710QC has an average color gamut error of just 1.46dE. After calibration, that drops to a pro-level 1.06dE. Again, there are no issues with any of the screens here, but remember that there are no factory calibrations in the group. These are all business-class monitors with mid-level price-tags. When it comes to accuracy, there is a lot of value in this category.

It seems many of these monitors manage to exceed the sRGB gamut volume standard. That’s a good thing because an ICC profile can reign in the primaries to their exact target values. Nothing can be done to improve an under-saturated color, but bonus volume can always be reduced. The PD2710QC fills the gamut out to over 106% thanks to extra red and green.

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Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.