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Creality Halot-One Plus 3D Printer Review: 4K Resolution, Sub-$400 Price

Creality Halot-One Plus is just the right size for a desktop resin 3D printer.

Creality Halot-One Plus 3D Printer
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

Tom's Hardware Verdict

Offering high resolution and an above-average build volume, the Creality Halot-One Plus is an impressive machine with a set of hardware features not typically seen at this price.

Pros

  • +

    4K+ resolution provides sharp detail and consistent surfaces

  • +

    Large 5-inch LCD interface is bright, fast, and responsive

  • +

    Halot Box slicer software is simple and easy to use

  • +

    Built-in Wi-Fi connectivity and remote print monitoring

  • +

    Integrated air filtration unit

Cons

  • -

    Z endstop placement at the top of the Z axis is a strange choice

  • -

    Creality Cloud platform appears to host many unauthorized models

  • -

    Four bolt build platform leveling can be messy

The Creality Halot-One Plus is the flagship printer in the Halot line of MSLA printers, offering 4K resolution, a 7.9-inch mono LCD with a 3 second exposure time, and other high-end features in a package that retails for just under $400. The Halot-One Plus appears to have been designed for the prosumer market, with features like Wi-Fi connectivity, air filtration, and other features that don’t typically appear in printers in this price range. 

During testing, this printer proved to be a logical next-step in resin 3D printing, showing how these features can be successfully implemented at a lower price point while still maintaining functionality. We had issues with the Creality Cloud platform and the lack of attribution on published models, but the printer hardware itself places this among the best resin 3D printers

Creality Halot-One Plus Specifications

Machine Footprint9.29" x 9.57" x 16.46" (23.6cm x 24.3cm x 41.8cm)
Build Volume6.77" x 4.02" x 6.30" (172mm x 102mm x 160mm)
ResinMSLA Photopolymer Resin
UV Light4,500 uw/m2 Integral Light Source
Masking LCD Resolution4320 x 2560
Masking LCD Size7.9-inch
XY Axis Resolution.04mm
Interface5-inch LCD Touchscreen

Included in the Box of Creality Halot-One Plus

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Creality Halot-One Plus ships with everything you need to get started printing, including a set of Allen keys, plastic and metal scrapers to remove parts from the printer, a printed user guide, and a power cable, and some paper funnels for pouring resin back into the bottle from the vat. The printer itself is well-packed and protected, with a protective plastic covering over the UV-resistant lid. 

Unlike with many other resin printers, including the Elegoo Mars 3, the Halot-One Plus does not include any consumables such as gloves, masks, or other cleaning supplies. This isn’t a large omission, but it means first time users will want to make sure they have all the proper supplies before they start printing.

Design of Creality Halot-One Plus

One of the first features I noticed on the Creality Halot-One Plus was the large LCD screen. The 5-inch screen is bright, responsive, and feels like the type of capacitive screen you’d expect to see on a tablet or mobile phone. This screen is easy to read and use, and immediately sets the Halot-One Plus apart from similarly priced machines that use smaller screens. The Halot-One Plus also includes an onboard ARM Cortex-M4 quad-core 64 bit processor, which gives it more processing power than other similarly priced machines.

The Halot-One Plus has a dark blue UV-resistant lid, something that stands out from the typical red, orange, or yellow used on similar printers. This lid is close to opaque, and I can’t easily see through it during printing. The QR code printed on the top of the lid leads to the Creality Cloud site where users can purchase models, 3D printers, consumables, as well as a social platform for sharing prints.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Halot-One Plus features an integrated 100W power supply, so there’s no need for an external power brick. The build size, printer size, and other information is printed on a sticker on the back of the printer, as well as a QR code that appears to contain information specific to the printer. The base of the Halot-One Plus is heavy and dense, and feels very sturdy despite the plastic shell.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The integrated air filtration system on the Halot-One Plus is a welcome addition and worked very well throughout our testing. The resin used in the MSLA printing process can have an odor during printing, and the integrated air filtration system significantly reduces the amount of odor from the Halot-One Plus. The air intake is located directly behind the resin vat, and runs automatically throughout the duration of printing.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Z axis on the Halot-One Plus uses a threaded rod with a captive nut for travel, and the dual linear rails allow for smooth and consistent movement. Most small format MSLA resin 3D printers use a single linear rail for travel, with dual rail systems being more common on larger machines like the Elegoo Saturn or the Anycubic Mono X. The build platform is suspended from a lightweight metal arm and doesn’t deflect, even when printing large and heavy parts.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Halot-One Plus has the Z endstop located at the top of the Z axis, an unusual design choice for an MSLA resin 3D printer. Typically, the leveling process involves dropping the platform to Z0 (the bottom of the Z axis) and ensuring the platform is planar with the LCD screen. The Halot-One Plus requires the entire platform be brought to the top of the printer to define Z0, and then lowered to the LCD screen and leveled. It’s hard to say if this is a less accurate process, but it’s definitely a more time-consuming one.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The resin vat on the Halot-One Plus is smooth and easy to clean, with printed labels that indicate 250mL, 450mL, and 650mL fill levels. The vat also has a spout molded into the front right and back left corners, which makes pouring resin out of the vat and back into the bottle a simple and mess-free process. One of the screws that secures the vat to the frame had some flashing on the molded thumbscrew, and this meant the screw couldn’t actually fit into the mating hole without being trimmed. Not a major issue, but definitely a QC issue that should have been caught before the printer was packed and left the factory.

The light source of the Halot-One Plus is what Creality calls the “Integral Light Source”, which is a high-powered 4,500 uw/cm2 LED array that is projected through the masking LCD via an angled mirror in the base of the printer. This light source generates a substantial amount of heat during printing, which causes the onboard fan to run continuously during printing.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The 7.9-inch masking LCD has a resolution of 4320 x 2560, a resolution that is slightly above the typical 4K resolution (4098 x 2560) used on similar resin 3D printers like the Elegoo Mars 3. This 4K resolution translates to an XY pixel size of .04mm (40 microns), which is high enough to capture fine details and texture when printing.

Image: Creality

(Image credit: Creality)

Build Platform on Creality Halot-One Plus

The Creality Halot-One Plus uses a four bolt leveling system to ensure a planar relationship between the build platform and the masking LCD. Because the Z endstop is located at the very top of the printer, this process involves loosening the build platform connecting bolts, sending the built platform to the top of the printer to trigger the endstop, then reversing direction and sending the platform to the bottom of the Z axis. Once the platform is sitting flush on the masking LCD, the four bolts are tightened and the platform is leveled.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Halot-One Plus has four upward-facing bolts that secure the build platform to the gantry arm, and these bolts tend to fill with resin during printing. This is a poor design choice, as resin tends to pool inside the bolt cap heads, in the knurling, and around the bolts, which is very difficult to clean and remove. Elegoo has solved this on their Mars 2 Pro and Mars 3 printers by using a simple captive ball joint that can be leveled with only two screws. Those platforms are easy to level and clean without additional effort.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Printing Safety with Halot-One Plus

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Creality Halot-One Plus uses 405nm UV resin, a material that you need to handle safely when in an uncured state to avoid injury. The resin can be harmful when making contact with skin, so make sure to wear gloves when pouring, cleaning up, or handling uncured resin. I also make sure I’m wearing gloves when removing the build platform after a print, as the resin tends to pool on top of the platform and can drip off while the platform is being removed.

Make sure you use the Halot-One Plus in a well-ventilated room to minimize the danger from inhaling fumes. Any spills or uncured resin stuck to a surface should be cleaned using 99% isopropyl alcohol and the container for the resin should be kept closed and secured when not actively pouring material.

Printing the Included Test Print on the Creality Halot-One Plus

The test print included with the Creality Halot-One Plus is one of the best demonstration prints I have ever seen. The 8 hour print is titled “Kholek Suneater”, and it fills nearly the entire build area of the Halot-One Plus from corner to corner. This model comes pre-sliced using the same settings as in Halot Box (.05mm layer height, 3 second layer exposure time, 40 second base layer exposure time, etc.), and is ready to print directly from the USB thumb drive.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Creality has apparently identified one of the common applications of resin 3D printing (tabletop gaming and miniatures) and has embraced this by including a detailed miniature model with the Halot-One Plus. My previous experience with Creality’s test prints was poor; the Creality LD-002R (a budget MSLA resin 3D printer) included a test model that took over 19 hours to print and was not particularly impressive.

This model has a very dense support structure, which is required to support all the various fine features including a long hammer and tail. The support structure was removed easily and left minimal marks on the printed model. Unfortunately, I broke the hammer during washing, but was able to glue it back on without much effort. The spikes on the armor, the thin tail, and the other details present on this model are sharp and in focus, and I believe that anyone who purchased this printer to make miniatures would be immediately delighted to see such a high-quality model come out of the printer without any additional preparation.

Preparing Files for Printing with Creality Halot Box

(Image credit: Creality)

While resin 3D printers tend to be much more mechanically simple than filament FDM 3D printers, the software typically requires more setup work and the part preparation is a very important part of the process. Creality includes a copy of Halot Box with the Creality Halot-One Plus, which is the slicer design for the Halot series of printers. 

Halot Box offers two separate menus for slicing parts: Basic Options and Advanced Options. As expected, Basic Options contains parameters like layer thickness, exposure time, build platform raise height, and more which users will likely adjust the most often. These options are pre-populated with parameters that are more focused on success as opposed to speed, with a 3-second layer exposure and a 40 second initial layers exposure. Advanced Options contains more complicated parameters, such as shrinkage compensation for X, Y, and Z axes, anti-aliasing, and other parameters.

(Image credit: Creality)

Halot Box is a fully featured slicer and is capable of importing models, hollowing them for resin printing, adding support structures, and even more advanced features like adding text, slicing a model into pieces, and measuring between two points. These features make Halot Box just as feature-rich as ChituBox and Lychee slicer, both of which are also compatible with the Halot-One Plus.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

I prepared this model of a dragon using the default Halot Box settings, including a 5mm shell after hollowing, medium support settings, and default slicer settings. Sliced with a .05mm layer height and a 3 second exposure time, this print took just over 12 hours to print out using Anycubic Water Washable Aqua Grey resin. The process of importing a model, hollowing, adding drain holes, adding support, and slicing took about 5 minutes and was intuitive and easy.

Comparison of the Creality Halot-One Plus vs. Elegoo Mars 3

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The 4K resolution mono LCD on the Creality Halot-One Plus makes it a natural competitor to smaller resin printers like the Elegoo Mars 3, but the larger build volume and Wi-Fi capabilities help it to edge out most competition. Instead of focusing on Z height, the Halot-One Plus has a large surface area on the build platform, providing additional space for printing multiple parts.

Creality Halot-One PlusElegoo Mars 3
Masking LCD Resolution4320 x 25604098 x 2560
Masking LCD Size7.9 inches6.7 inches
XY Resolution.04mm.035mm
Build Dimensions6.77 x 4.01 x 6.29 inches5.64 x 3.52 x 6.89 inches
 (172mm x 102mm x 160mm)(143mm × 89mm × 175mm)
Build Volume170.76 cubic inches136.79 cubic inches
Printer Dimensions9.29 x 9.57 x 16.46 inches8.93 x 8.93 x 17.28 inches
 (23.6cm x 24.3cm x 41.8cm)(22.7cm x 22.7cm x 43.85cm)
Printer Volume1463 cubic inches1378 cubic inches
Build / Footprint Ratio11.70%9.90%
(higher is better)  
Price$399 $299

The Halot-One Plus has a somewhat squat appearance in contrast with the taller and narrower Mars 3, and the large LCD screen on the front gives it an appearance that is closer to an appliance than a 3D printer. The build volume is somewhere between the Elegoo Mars 3 and the Elegoo Saturn, and the price also sits between the two.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Halot-One Plus is slightly larger in size than the Mars 3, but the differences in build volume and X/Y area are clear when comparing the two. In addition, the built-in air filtration system, large LCD, and dual Z axis linear rails give the Halot-One Plus a more industrial appearance. The front-facing USB port makes swapping out USB drives easy on both printers, but the power button on the Halot-One Plus is located on the back of the machine as opposed to the front-mounted power button on the Mars 3.

The build platform of the Halot-One Plus has a lightly textured surface, which gives printed parts a more complex surface to bond to during printing. Placing the platform of the Halot-One Plus and the Mars 3 side-by-side highlights the difference in build area, with the Halot-One Plus being a full inch longer in the X axis and just under half an inch wider in the Y axis. The difference in build area is complemented by an increase in pixel resolution, which makes the Halot-One Plus XY pixel size .04mm, a 5 micron difference from the .035mm resolution of the Mars 3.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Printing a Large Model on Creality Halot-One Plus

(Image credit: Creality)

The build platform on the Creality Halot-One Plus is large enough to fit busts from Loot Studio, so I printed the bust of Korut The Mechappilian. The model prints in 5 pieces: the bust, left arm, right arm, base, and minigun. I was able to fit the bust and both arms onto a single build platform, and printed the minigun and base separately. Processing these files in Halot Box was easy, and just involved dragging the models into the window, clicking “slice”, and exporting. No additional steps were needed, and I used Anycubic Grey Craftsman Resin (opens in new tab) and the default exposure settings.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The first filled build platform printed flawlessly, and the level of detail was incredible. The lizard-like texture on the model looked realistic, and the smooth armor components had a consistent and even appearance. The 3-second exposure time seemed like a perfect fit for this resin as the support material snapped off easily and without leaving major pockmarks on the model.

After washing and curing the model, the general surface quality was still very impressive. The smooth surfaces have an even appearance and there are virtually no layer lines present, owing to the .05mm layer height and the .04mm X/Y resolution. The nubs left by the support structure detach easily, and can be removed by simply running a pair of tweezers over them.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The final assembled bust looks more like a resin collectible than a 3D print, and the general quality was as good as any resin 3D printer under $2,500 that I have used. The joints fit together with simple peg and hole locating features, and they were a perfect friction fit. You can clearly make out the lizard skin texture on the model, and the fine detailing on the armor is easy to see without magnification.

Printing Models from Creality Cloud

(Image credit: Creality)

Creality has implemented Creality Cloud into its Halot Box software, which allows users to download models directly from the internet into their slicer. This feature has come under scrutiny due to the widespread abuse enabled by the ability to mass upload models, regardless of their copyright or designer intent. YouTuber Bryan Vines made an excellent video discussing this topic, which shows how the platform was intended to be used versus the current usage. 

For example, on the front page of the Creality Cloud, I saw the chainmail model by Agustin “Flowalistik” Arroyo. This model is currently available with a Creative Commons Attribution license, which means attribution is required when sharing the model or derivatives. The model on Creality Cloud has been uploaded by “user3265593031”, and features the picture from Printables as well as filenames with “flowalistik” in them, further proving they were uploaded by someone other than the creator.

(Image credit: Creality)

The chainmail model was easily downloaded, sliced, and sent to the printer without any additional steps required through Halot Box. While this does make searching for and downloading models a simple process, it’s troubling to see that the original creator has no effective recourse for limiting this type of piracy. In this case, I was aware of the original creator but it would be completely understandable that most users may not, and may even think the model was being provided by Creality directly.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Halot-One Plus is also able to download models from Creality Cloud directly from the printer interface without using Halot Box or any other slicer software. While this is a convenient feature, it is still subject to the same issues as downloading models from Creality Cloud via Halot Box. For instance, I downloaded this Minion file from the printer interface, but have no easy way to determine who the original designer was, what copyright license they used, and their intent for the printed model. In addition, the model printed completely solid and used significantly more resin than I was expecting for such a small print.

Bottom Line

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Creality Halot-One Plus is a sleek, smart, and well-performing printer that worked well during our testing  and left me impressed with the quality of prints made with minimal to no adjusting of the default settings when using the Halot Box slicer. The 172mm x 102mm x 160mm build volume is larger than other similarly priced printers, and the 4K resolution of the masking LCD provides sharp detail and fine features.

The Halot-One Plus sits in the awkward spot between small and large format resin 3D printers, and it’s hard to see if there is a place in the market for this machine. The large onboard LCD and built-in Wi-Fi connectivity are something you would expect on a more expensive printer like the Prusa SL1S, but are users currently looking for these features over build volume and print speed? That’s a hard question to answer, and only time will tell if the Halot-One Plus becomes a popular model. 

If resolution isn’t your primary concern and you’re looking for the most build volume for your dollar, the Elegoo Saturn (on sale on Amazon for $369) and Elegoo Saturn 2 (available as a pre-order for $550) provide larger build volumes for a similar price tag. If you want to go in the other direction and find a printer with a higher resolution and aren’t worried about the price, the Phrozen Sonic Mini 8K provides an eye-watering .022mm XY resolution at an $899 price tag.

Andrew Sink
Andrew Sink

Andrew Sink first used a 3D printer in 2012, and has been enthusiastically involved in the 3D printing industry ever since. Having printed everything from a scan of his own brain to a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, he continues to dive ever more deeply into the endless applications of additive technology. He is always working on new experiments, designs, and reviews and sharing his results on Tom's Hardware, YouTube, and more.