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Deepcool Gamer Storm Captain 240 Liquid CPU Cooler Review

Deepcool’s Gamer Storm brings us a dual-120mm liquid cooler with enhanced style and reduced price, but can it still deliver the performance?

Conclusion

Regardless of whether you call its brand Deepcool or Gamer Storm, the Captain 240 produces slightly lower temperatures than its most closely-sized competitor, at a far lower price, and with far greater noise. In fact, it produces more noise in low-speed mode than that competitor produces at full speed. There must be an advantage somewhere though, right?

An actual price reduction of nearly 24 percent allows the Captain 240 to gain a one percent performance-per-dollar advantage over its high-end counterpart. We need to look at NZXT’s larger radiator and fans if we want to find a liquid cooler with enough of a performance advantage to gain the upper hand in value. Unfortunately, many cases don’t support NZXT’s two-by-140mm configuration.

We could talk about the elephant in the room, Noctua’s NH-D15. Speaking of elephants though, that big air cooler hangs nearly three-pounds of metal off the CPU socket. Though I still use big air in my immobilized office machine, that’s just a little too much heft to be moving around in such an insecure manner. We’ve broken a few boards that way.

Weight is the biggest reason any of us would choose a mid-sized liquid cooler over big air. Sure, there’s also more space around the CPU socket to install and remove memory, but heft is the thing that weighs on our minds. The Gamer Storm Captain 240 by Deepcool is both light on the socket and light on the wallet.

MORE: Latest Cooling NewsMORE: All Cooling Articles

Thomas Soderstrom is a Senior Staff Editor at Tom's Hardware, covering Cases, Cooling,Memory and Motherboards. Follow him on Twitter.

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  • mrmike_49
    Looks like they spread on the thermal paste with a trowel!!!!
    Reply
  • PDO
    Isn't that the way you are supposed to, or are you telling me that I've been doing wrong all this time.
    Reply
  • Crashman
    16036480 said:
    Looks like they spread on the thermal paste with a trowel!!!!
    The factory thermal paste? We didn't use it. We took a photo of it and scraped it off so that wouldn't be a factor in thermal measurement. All coolers are tested with Arctic MX-4 as an equalizer (it performs well and is re-useable when fresh).

    Reply
  • Blueberries
    I wish companies would stop branding radiators, memory, etc with "gamer" names. How stupid is that? It's not a keyboard, or a headset, or a video card, or a monitor, or... you get my point; the design of these items doesn't change, you always want the best thermal dissipation from a radiator. Calling it "sniper," "headshot," "nightvision," "dragons," is so tacky and unattractive, especially if it comes with an equally as tacky design or heatsink. If anything it turns me away from their product because I assume "Oh, this is in no way marketed towards professionals. We can get away with a shoddier product and nobody will notice!"
    Reply
  • SuperVeloce
    I think that those deepcool fans are the weak point here. Sure fans from DC looks and feels like a quality product to the touch (for the most part), performance and noise is subpar for a price I usually bought them for.
    Reply
  • ppalm
    Normally, I'm not one to care about looks, but that thing looks freakin' sweet when lit up sitting there on top of the CPU. I'm a low-profile black-case no-window kind of guy, so pragmatics win for me (Noctua) but this cooler makes the CPU look like a little reactor. Pretty snazzy.
    Reply
  • logainofhades
    I really like the looks of the cooler itself. The clear pipe, on the block is a nice touch. Paired with some better fans, and this would be a great cooler, imo.
    Reply
  • BuffaloChuck
    I wish the author would tell us what the SOURCE of the noise is. Is it the fan blades (therefore anyone interested in swapping out fans can experiment) or is it the OKLAHOMA effect (wind comes sweeping the radiator blades - I think that's how the song goes).

    As for looks, I'd never give a hoot. Who spends time oohing and ahhing, getting physically 'excited' by computer parts?!! Sheesh..."Do something WITH the computer, don't just stare at it's purty lights."
    Reply
  • logainofhades
    16059116 said:
    I wish the author would tell us what the SOURCE of the noise is. Is it the fan blades (therefore anyone interested in swapping out fans can experiment) or is it the OKLAHOMA effect (wind comes sweeping the radiator blades - I think that's how the song goes).

    As for looks, I'd never give a hoot. Who spends time oohing and ahhing, getting physically 'excited' by computer parts?!! Sheesh..."Do something WITH the computer, don't just stare at it's purty lights."

    Umm many people care about looks. If they didn't we wouldn't have cases with side windows. It is no different than a person getting physically excited by the looks of a car.
    Reply
  • Crashman
    16059116 said:
    I wish the author would tell us what the SOURCE of the noise is. Is it the fan blades (therefore anyone interested in swapping out fans can experiment) or is it the OKLAHOMA effect (wind comes sweeping the radiator blades - I think that's how the song goes).

    As for looks, I'd never give a hoot. Who spends time oohing and ahhing, getting physically 'excited' by computer parts?!! Sheesh..."Do something WITH the computer, don't just stare at it's purty lights."
    It's a whizzing, not a whooshing, so the fans are definitely making a whiz. Better than taking one I suppose, given that it's hanging over a motherboard and graphics card.

    Reply