Deepcool Quadstellar ATX Chassis Review: A Big, Bold Performer

Deepcool is primarily known for its line of CPU air coolers, all-in-one liquid CPU coolers and power supplies. Although not as well known in the US as companies such as Thermaltake or Corsair, the company has branched out into consumer electronics, cooling fans and computer cases. The latter is what brings us here today.

Specifications

Exterior

Deepcool’s successor to the its massive Tristellar Mini-ITX case, appropriately named the Quadstellar due to its four separate component compartments, is a unique beast in every sense of those words (both unique and beast). Measuring 483 x 493 x 538mm (W x H x D) and tipping the scales at almost 34lbs empty, the word "beast" definitely suits this chassis.

The four-lobed compartmentalized design of this case is unlike any computer chassis you've ever seen before, which is why "unique" is such a fitting description. 

Starting at the front of the chassis, the Quadstellar features a powder coated front panel frame constructed of cast aluminum. There are four plastic panels, one for each compartment, that can be opened to allow more airflow into the chassis. The panels are controlled via the accompanying Quadstellar app and can be set to open automatically or controlled directly from the app. Unfortunately, the panels do not have the option to be opened manually. This seems to be a bit of an oversight. The large diamond shaped button at the center of the front fascia is the power button.

The leading edge of the upper left lobe of the front section is home to two USB 3.0 ports and the headphone and microphone jacks. Inside this compartment you will find hard drive mounting locations with plastic drive caddies. The upper right compartment is equipped with mounting locations for a graphics cards or water cooling components. The lower right hand lobe of the chassis acts as the motherboard chamber. The lower left lobe is the PSU compartment. We'll go into more detail of these sections later in this review.


All four lobes of this chassis are equipped with tempered glass panels that attach to the frame via powerful magnets, and metal covers that slide off from the rear and are held in place by thumbscrews.

Around back you'll find an opening for a bottom-mounted PSU, eight standard expansion-card slots (plus six vertical ones in the upper right hand compartment for video-card mounting), and an exhaust-fan mounting location in the upper right hand compartment. There are four large rubber feet that keep the case approximately half an inch off the ground.


The Deepcool Quadstellar is equipped with a very nice fan filtration system. Every intake fan mounting location in the front of the chassis is equipped with a large nylon filter. Accessing these filters requires using the app to set the front doors into the open position. There is also a large filter located in the motherboard cabin as well. 

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  • canadianvice
    That is COOL. No doubt massive, but a very neat case.
  • redgarl
    I love the GPU and PSU compartment idea, I can't agree with the design and the price. Now only if Fractal or Phantek could incorporate these feats in one of their offering, that would be interesting.
  • BulkZerker
    $400...
    No USB Type-C port
    Disappointing, really expect this from something at this price point.
    No manual controls (app only)
    Absolutely ruined.
  • Karl_in_Chicago
    $400 and no USB-C? Sigh.
  • mlee 2500
    Hideous and Pointless.
  • MxMatrix
    Why do you need 9 3,5" hdd slots? This is the era of pcie -SSD, m.2 and 2,5" form factor.
  • panathas
    Nice case but I think that the acoustic efficiency chart is wrong, unfair and unrealistic. You can't take 2 extreme scenarios that would never co-exist at the same time and create an acoustic efficiency chart. There is no way you can compare the temps of a closed doors case with the noise of an open door case. If you want to have the temps of a closed doors case you have to show the noise levels of a closed doors case and vice versa. Otherwise that chart has no meaning at all. Thanks.
  • tjdoherty19
    would have been nice if some of the pics of the case weren't close-ups. can't see what's going on.
  • Lasselundberg
    reminds me of the Ghost from Destiny2...i really like the case...but lack of usb C bugs me...would like to see more USB ports in general....my biggest issue is the width of this thing...i would buy it in a heartbeat, but i dont have that kind of space next to my table
  • mischon123
    Moving the PSU into its own compartment with its own helper fan and thus thermally isolate it from the other components is a great idea. It works extremely well in my hot climate and my Air 240 case with 4 auxiliary fans, 1080 and water cpu cooler keeps things at max 64 celsius when gaming. Idle is 32 Celsius and with a 1700x everything else is Idle. Many bays. Power density and cooling is very high with this case. It reminds of 1970 Mini Crays, which were 20 bigger and 10 000x slower. Its kind of humourous in a way.

    This dp case is style over function and I like that mfg experiment. Dis case implies functionality where there is none - its akin to a 56 Eldorado :-). Nice, there is definitely space for non mainstream cases and mfg should explore concepts. No USB C is no go. Additonal cables will add failure points. The weight of this thing means it will deform over time when moved over time. Its a tin frame...and its senslessly big. A product for the affluence compromised youth living in a McMansion and held at an emotional distance by their parents with a Mastercard...and it does cure bad skin :-)
  • mischon123
    Moving the PSU into its own compartment with its own helper fan and thus thermally isolate it from the other components is a great idea. It works extremely well in my hot climate and my Air 240 case with 4 auxiliary fans, 1080 and water cpu cooler keeps things at max 64 celsius when gaming. Idle is 32 Celsius and with a 1700x everything else is Idle. Many bays. Power density and cooling is very high with this case. It reminds of 1970 Mini Crays, which were 20 bigger and 10 000x slower. Its kind of humourous in a way.

    This dp case is style over function and I like that mfg experiment. Dis case implies functionality where there is none - its akin to a 56 Eldorado :-). Nice, there is definitely space for non mainstream cases and mfg should explore concepts. No USB C is no go. Additonal cables will add failure points. The weight of this thing means it will deform over time when moved over time. Its a tin frame...and its senslessly big. A product for the affluence compromised youth living in a McMansion and held at an emotional distance by their parents with a Mastercard...and it does cure bad skin :-)
  • modusoperandi00
    It doesn't make a lick of sense to me, but God bless 'em for trying.
  • Rookie_MIB
    Anonymous said:
    Why do you need 9 3,5" hdd slots? This is the era of pcie -SSD, m.2 and 2,5" form factor.


    Indeed it is. But it's also the age of 'moar cores', and people like me can run a virtualized NAS inside a case like this by running VirtualBox and a CentOS distro configured to do what you want it to do. I actually just moved my main rig to a case with an ICYDock 5 and it has 6 more HDD bays in case I want to expand out and add more space to the ZFS array. And that's just for backing up my main NAS (2u rack mount server) for those just in case situations.

    The one thing people will NEVER complain about is having too much space. It's much more problematic when you don't have enough.

    And the case looks bad ass.