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Dell Inspiron 15 7559 $800 Gaming Laptop First Look

Benchmarks And Conclusion

For this first look, we ran synthetic and gaming benchmarks using PCMark 8, 3DMark Fire Strike, GFXBench and Unigine Valley, as well as Bioshock Infinite and Metro: Last Light Redux. I kept the system plugged into the wall for each test except GFXBench's battery benchmark, which naturally required me to unplug the power cable.

I'm making some comparisons to a couple of other gaming laptops in the lab. This isn't to imply that they all address the same target market, but rather they're what we have on-hand, yielding performance baselines.

Synthetic Benchmark - PCMark 8

Compared to our tests of the Lenovo Y700-15-Touch and Acer Predator 15, Dell's Inspiron 15 7559 appears significantly slower (Lenovo achieved a score of 3608 and the Acer pushed as high as 3802). Both systems benefit from faster CPUs, storage devices and more RAM. Of course, they also cost more. So it's not surprising that they outrun Dell's model.

Synthetic Benchmark - 3DMark Fire Strike

The Dell's results in 3DMark Fire Strike were also considerably lower. Lenovo and Dell utilize the same GeForce GTX 960M module with 640 CUDA cores attached to 4GB of GDDR5 over a 128-bit bus. But the Y700-15-Touch scored 4118, nearly doubling the Inspiron 15's outcome. This indicates that the CPU is likely a significant bottleneck. Acer's Predator 15 and its powerful GeForce GTX 980M blew both systems out of the water.

Syntehtic Benchmark - GFXBench

GFXBench's built-in battery test estimated that Dell's power source would last short of four hours while running the light gaming workload. The Dell demonstrates notably better battery life than Lenovo, but Acer's Predator 15 more than doubles its results.

What's interesting is that Acer's performance during the test also drops below the other systems, even though it uses faster hardware. It's probable that the Predator is throttling, but we're not sure why.

Synthetic Benchmark - Unigine Valley

The results I generated in Unigine Valley were strange. I tested at 1080p using Ultra, High and Medium presets. However, the Medium setting yielded the lowest average frame rate. Dell's Inspiron was plugged into the wall, sitting on a flat surface and the benchmark was executed immediately after firing up the program.

Surprised by the outcome, I ran the tests again with a momentary pause to change the preset between runs. The results didn't change, though. It appears that something else is bottlenecking performance (the CPU?).

Dell Inspiron 15 7559View Deal

Gaming Benchmark - Bioshock Infinite

Bioshock Infinite ran well on this laptop, achieving playable frame rates even with maxed-out settings. The minimum frame rate was rather low though, which is another sign that the CPU could be getting in the GPU's way.

Gaming Benchmark - Metro: Last Light Redux

Metro: Last Light Redux also produced strange results. Using the built-in benchmark, I set up three test profiles that were the same, but with different quality and tessellation settings. Each profile was configured to run the test three times and then average the results. The profiles were then queued in the program, and run consecutively while the system was charging on a flat surface.

Although the Medium preset scored the highest frame rate, it was only marginally smoother than the Very High preset. Oddly, the High settings resulted in the lowest performance, even though it's less taxing than Very High.

Conclusion

Overall, the Dell Inspiron 15 7559 performed well in all of the tests except Unigine Valley. Its hardware is more than capable of playing modern games at 1080p using demanding detail settings. Its low price, performance and battery life make it an excellent system for mobile gaming. Easy access to the platform's internals is a treat for PC enthusiasts who want to upgrade their hardware and clean out dusty fans.

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  • dstarr3
    I might just have to pick this up. I love the M.2 slot, so that you can have an OS SSD and then put a storage hard drive in it as well. That's not something you see a lot in this price range.
    Reply
  • stoned_ritual
    This is actually not a bad little machine for the money.
    Reply
  • xenol
    The only worrisome thing is how hot the keyboard area gets when running a game. But I'm sure it's a lot better than the XPS 15.

    I'm almost tempted to get one myself.

    EDIT: Notebookcheck reported the WASD area at about 41C under max load. That doesn't seem too bad.
    Reply
  • IInuyasha74
    17426197 said:
    The only worrisome thing is how hot the keyboard area gets when running a game. But I'm sure it's a lot better than the XPS 15.

    I'm almost tempted to get one myself.

    EDIT: Notebookcheck reported the WASD area at about 41C under max load. That doesn't seem too bad.

    I didn't go out of my way to test this, but from general use of the laptop while playing a few games on it, I did notice the keyboard getting a little warm. It wasn't too bad. Honestly, because the room was cold it was actually rather comfortable. Again though, take this with a grain of salt as I didn't do any measurements or do any specific tests to check the heat of the keyboard during game play, just an observation.
    Reply
  • James Mason
    I own this laptop. When i bought it for $760, it came with a 256mb m.2 SSD. It does run just about every game pretty well, good enough to satisfy a mobile gaming need. It runs some games at pretty high settings as well. For $750-800 it's a pretty good investment when you consider it's basically a $500 computer with a 1080p IPS monitor and keyboard included.

    I use it mostly in bed, and it doesn't ever get painfully hot, but it does get pretty warm. I'd recommend buying a laptop stand for it either way to facilitate good airflow because it's vents are on the bottom.
    Reply
  • DouglasThurman
    So I read the review of this laptop from Linus Tech Tips on YouTube, and the thing that might be an issue here for these benchmarks is the single 8GB SODIMM that comes with it. That would put it in single-channel mode which sucks. If you were to slap in another 8GB chip I'm sure the scores would be faster.
    Reply
  • Chayan4400
    So I read the review of this laptop from Linus Tech Tips on YouTube, and the thing that might be an issue here for these benchmarks is the single 8GB SODIMM that comes with it. That would put it in single-channel mode which sucks. If you were to slap in another 8GB chip I'm sure the scores would be faster.

    Doubt it. We regularly use single channel RAM for PC builds, and it's proven that unless you're running on the iGPU single vs dual channel has little to no effect on game's perfromance.
    Reply
  • I Hate Nvidia
    Am currently typing this replay from the reviewed laptop , I bought the configuration with 4K touch screen and Core I5 , 1 TB SSHD , Matt black featuring grey finish:
    For more than a month now, this Laptop proved to worth the money I paid ( 965$ from Amazon), still there are some serious problems need to be addressed:
    1- the Audio has a huge driver-hardware problem, at times there is noticeable and really annoying interference sound, it is specially noticeable with high bass levels, I thought the speakers were flawed , but using my Philips headphones n this terrible sound still there!
    2- Every single owner of this laptop complains from the same ( Intel HD Graphics 8 driver Has been crashed and recovered) , this happens a lot , alottt , and it can really get annoying during gaming as it suddenly makes the game unplayable ( MGS V Phantom Pain , SC2: Legacy of the Void , AoE : Casatle Siege) , so you might need to restart the PC when this happens , or disable the Intel HD graphics altogether and risk losing battery life!
    3- 4K only problem : Scaling , Scaling , Oh God MS! Scaling!!!!!! please???? and not only things get really small, performance takes a huge hit, for unknown reason!
    4- 4K looks amazing , and it worth every penny of the extra 170$ I paid , but I hoped for a deeper black and better contrast, still it is really bright and color are amazing.
    5- Battery life is much less than expected, almost 3.40 hours on medium backlighting , no Wi-Fi ( Airplane mode), hoped for almost 6 hours, but I guess the 4K panel is to blame for the short battery life.
    All in all, this a solid performing - budget gaming laptop, MGS V = 1080 P all maxed out and smooth gaming , Legacy of the void = 1440P all maxed out and smooth gaming, add an extra 265 GB M.2 for 120$ and an extra 8 GB for 30$ and you will end with a beats machine for the money,the Keyboard experience needs some time to get used to, but it is not bad at all (Coming from an amazing Lenovo Keyboard, so everything seems less than acceptable at first), touch pad is rough, it is sensitive but rough and alson needs some time , like 3 days, to get used to, but it is not bad at all, gestures work perfectly, but I have a Touch Panel, so yeah , I paid extra for it and I should use it :) , other than that, it needs some drivers attention from Dell to end as a real competitor for much more expensive machines.

    Reply
  • cub_fanatic
    Finally. This is what I have been wanting from Intel for years. I have always wondered why Intel didn't have a mobile quad core i5. They must have realized since the first core i5 quad core, no HT CPU that that configuration was what most mid-range gamers wanted. Before this, your only choices were a dual core, 4 thread i5 that turbo boosted. The only difference between that and the mobile i3 of the same base clock was the turbo boost. The only way you got 4 physical cores was a high end i7. Even the next step up from a mobile i5 was a dual core mobile i7 that really was just a slightly higher clocked version of the best mobile i5. This fills a gap that I can't believe took this long to fill. The last quad core, no HT mobile CPU that Intel had before this was a Core 2 Quad gen. chip from around 2008. Technically, Intel has had very low TDP quad core mobile chips in very low end laptops like the Atom and Bay Trail SoCs. But, those are nowhere near gaming chips like this i5 is.
    Reply
  • IInuyasha74
    17427203 said:
    Am currently typing this replay from the reviewed laptop , I bought the configuration with 4K touch screen and Core I5 , 1 TB SSHD , Matt black featuring grey finish:
    For more than a month now, this Laptop proved to worth the money I paid ( 965$ from Amazon), still there are some serious problems need to be addressed:
    1- the Audio has a huge driver-hardware problem, at times there is noticeable and really annoying interference sound, it is specially noticeable with high bass levels, I thought the speakers were flawed , but using my Philips headphones n this terrible sound still there!
    2- Every single owner of this laptop complains from the same ( Intel HD Graphics 8 driver Has been crashed and recovered) , this happens a lot , alottt , and it can really get annoying during gaming as it suddenly makes the game unplayable ( MGS V Phantom Pain , SC2: Legacy of the Void , AoE : Casatle Siege) , so you might need to restart the PC when this happens , or disable the Intel HD graphics altogether and risk losing battery life!
    3- 4K only problem : Scaling , Scaling , Oh God MS! Scaling!!!!!! please???? and not only things get really small, performance takes a huge hit, for unknown reason!
    4- 4K looks amazing , and it worth every penny of the extra 170$ I paid , but I hoped for a deeper black and better contrast, still it is really bright and color are amazing.
    5- Battery life is much less than expected, almost 3.40 hours on medium backlighting , no Wi-Fi ( Airplane mode), hoped for almost 6 hours, but I guess the 4K panel is to blame for the short battery life.
    All in all, this a solid performing - budget gaming laptop, MGS V = 1080 P all maxed out and smooth gaming , Legacy of the void = 1440P all maxed out and smooth gaming, add an extra 265 GB M.2 for 120$ and an extra 8 GB for 30$ and you will end with a beats machine for the money,the Keyboard experience needs some time to get used to, but it is not bad at all (Coming from an amazing Lenovo Keyboard, so everything seems less than acceptable at first), touch pad is rough, it is sensitive but rough and alson needs some time , like 3 days, to get used to, but it is not bad at all, gestures work perfectly, but I have a Touch Panel, so yeah , I paid extra for it and I should use it :) , other than that, it needs some drivers attention from Dell to end as a real competitor for much more expensive machines.

    At $965, even if the GPU is a little under powered for 4K gaming, that is a steal.

    For your audio issue, perhaps you can check for an updated driver? I didn't notice any audio issues when using the system. I also didn't notice any issues with the display drivers. The 4K panel is contributing to your lower battery life, higher-resolution panels tend to consume more power. 3.4 hours isn't terrible, but I can certainly understand your desire for longer battery life.

    The RAM and M.2 SSD upgrades are definitely a great idea for anyone shopping for one of these. I personally would have done this if I was keeping this system.
    Reply