Skip to main content

Monoprice CrystalPro 28-Inch 4K Monitor Review

Nearly every monitor manufacturer has a 28-inch TN Ultra HD monitor in its line-up. Today we’re looking at Monoprice’s CrystalPro 4K. Even though it’s based on the same part as its competitors, you get quality that matches or exceeds those displays.

Results: Grayscale Tracking And Gamma Response

Our grayscale and gamma tests are described in detail here.

A budget monitor that registers an out-of-box result this good is rare. Aside from a little too much green and red at 100-percent brightness, the Monoprice has no visible error. That’s mainly due to the Innolux part, which shows a similar result in all the brands we’ve tested so far. The chart shows the Normal color temp mode.

Usually when a display has an sRGB mode, it’s pretty close to correct. But this one takes a step downward in accuracy. Now you can see a slight green tint across the board. It’s not a grievous error, however, Normal is definitely the better choice if you don’t calibrate.

These are the numbers you'd expect from an expensive professional monitor. Obviously, Monoprice didn't cut corners in the engineering department with its Ultra HD flagship.

Here is our comparison group:

A grayscale error of 2.13dE is perfectly acceptable for any screen in our opinion. Looking at the entire group, this is one area where all the screens are pretty much equal. None of them are begging for a calibration and they’ll all look just fine without one.

OK now we’re seriously impressed. Remember that all of the displays in this chart use the same panel. Obviously, that doesn’t mean the end products are created equal.

The Asus and Philips screens don't seem to be taking full advantage of the panel’s capabilities. A result of .78dE is what we’d expect from a professional screen costing at least twice as much.

Gamma Response

We found a little weakness in our gamma tests. Without calibration, there is a gradual slide all the way up the brightness scale. It robs image depth because much of the detail is too bright. Unfortunately, the gamma presets only move the tracking up and down. The trace’s shape looks the same at all settings.

Calibration improves the gamma response significantly. Now there is only a minimal error at the 90-percent mark. If you want an overall darker look, you can select the 2.4 gamma preset, though it’s a fairly coarse adjustment. In our tests, the best numbers come from the 2.2 option.

Here is our comparison group again:

None of these displays have any serious gamma tracking problems. A fifth-place finish in this group is not a bad thing, though there is a little room for improvement from Monoprice and Planar.

We calculate gamma deviation by expressing the difference from 2.2 as a percentage.

If the Monoprice had a 2.3 gamma option, the result would likely be better. Our measured average is 2.13, translating to a 3.18-percent deviation. The variance is toward the light side, and we’d prefer to see it a little too dark instead. This is extreme nit-picking, however. We really like the look of the CrystalPro 4K a lot.

  • cats_Paw
    4k, 3d... next they will make a 5 something.
    THe market is not ready yet for that resolution, and the price is too high.
    Reply
  • milkod2001
    Looking at Amazon link with price:$749 and other Amazon links for monitors from well established brands(cheaper) ,this Monoprice TN looks like bad attempt for joke.



    Reply
  • milkod2001
    Amazon link for Asus monitor brings me to AOC
    Reply
  • de5_Roy
    i wish it was IPS too!
    i also wish it was a 22-24" display. IMO woulda helped with viewing angle issues that plague TN-based monitors i.e. smaller size leads to less need for eye movement, sharper image from higher PPI.
    Reply
  • Karsten75
    Your links are FUBAR. The link for the Asus PB287Q links to an AOC monitor. In any event, the price for the Asus PB287Q on Amazon is $612, NOT $399.
    Reply
  • aberkae
    The price is $429 for this 4k monoprice monitor, thanks for the review you guys listen to requests much appreciated.
    Reply
  • DisplayJunkie
    Wow, Monoprice FINALLY managed to produce a display which isn't completely useless like their previous products with no backlight/brightness control.

    Seems well built and the factory calibration is decent but $575 for TN, 60Hz...and most importantly and not surprisingly, only 850:1 contrast ratio (which Tom's calls "Good contrast" LOL).... as with all 4K TNs, all it has going for it is the high resolution. No other compelling reason to buy it, many other compelling reasons for other displays.
    Reply
  • aberkae
    15320841 said:
    Wow, Monoprice FINALLY managed to produce a display which isn't completely useless like their previous products with no backlight/brightness control.

    Seems well built and the factory calibration is decent but $575 for TN, 60Hz...and most importantly and not surprisingly, only 850:1 contrast ratio (which Tom's calls "Good contrast" LOL).... as with all 4K TNs, all it has going for it is the high resolution. No other compelling reason to buy it, many other compelling reasons for other displays.
    they just had a sale that ended it was $429 I have the promo in my email, I'm expecting the price to fall again to that price

    Reply
  • beshonk
    Where's the Benq XL2420G review? I'm debating on 4k, but whatever i buy will be G-sync for sure.
    Reply
  • Chris Droste
    right now; today, 2/18 on AMAZON; this monitor is $750
    Dell P2815Q = $409
    Samsung U28D590D = $529
    both are UHD, HUNDREDs of dollars cheaper from brands with better reputations, and based on what Tom's knows about the panel it's all from the same Manufacturer, so...why get the Monoprice one again? adjustable stand for an extra $200 maybe? i don't get it...
    Reply