Skip to main content

MSI MPG Artymis 343CQR Review: Extreme 1000R Curve for Maximum Realism

With bonus features galore

MSI MPG Artymis 343CQR
(Image: © MSI)

Viewing Angles

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Though VA monitors are typically a little weak in their viewing angles, the 343CQR acquits itself well. Color goes a bit green with a 50% reduction in brightness at 45 degrees to the sides. Detail remains visible in highlight and shadow areas, but the image is definitely duller when viewed off-center. Performance is much the same from the top with a reduction in detail as gamma becomes lighter.

Screen Uniformity

To learn how we measure screen uniformity, click here.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The 343CQR looked better than its 12.07% screen uniformity test result indicates. There are measurable hotspots in the center and upper right zones of the screen, but we could only see a slight glow in the upper right. This artifact disappears at any brightness level above 0. There were no visible color uniformity issues at any brightness level. And the image looked consistent regardless of the screen’s curvature or our head position.

Pixel Response & Input Lag

Click here to read up on our pixel response and input lag testing procedures.

Image 1 of 2

MSI MPG Artymis 343CQR

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 2

MSI MPG Artymis 343CQR

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The 343CQR compares well in the response test with a 7ms draw time. That’s equal to most 144 Hz screens and many other 165 Hz monitors too. We were a little surprised at its input lag result though. It was beat by all the 144 Hz panels, except the AOC. Of course, the Samsung is on another level running at 240 Hz; it’s only here because it shares the same curve radius as the MSI. If you’re shopping for the fastest possible gaming monitor, other comparable displays can buy you a few milliseconds over the 343CQR. But a total lag of 30 ms is plenty fast enough for anyone but the most competitive and skilled players.

Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.