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Nixeus NX-VUE24A Monitor Review

FreeSync and G-Sync monitors are selling at a premium but Nixeus breaks that trend with a value-priced 24-inch model the runs FreeSync from 30 to 144Hz. Today we check out the NX-VUE24A.

Our Verdict

We’d rather game on an IPS or VA monitor but at this price, it’s hard to ignore the NX-VUE24A. It cuts a few corners but for smooth tear-free gaming it matches performance with more expensive products. Its FHD resolution means you won’t have to max your credit card to afford enough graphics horsepower. For the budget gaming rig, it’s pretty hard to beat right now.

For

  • 144Hz • Color accuracy • Freesync @ 30-144Hz • Low price

Against

  • Doesn’t reach rated brightness • Inaccurate gamma • No USB • TN panel

Introduction

Whenever a display is marketed specifically as a “gaming monitor” it usually carries a price premium. In the past such screens weren’t much different than their business-oriented counterparts. You might have seen a little fancier styling and perhaps some gaming-specific picture modes but at the core they’d be the same 60Hz panels seen in thousands of cubicles.

With the introduction of the Asus VG248QE in 2013 we saw a shift in thinking that truly set gaming monitors apart from the rest. A 144Hz refresh rate was the main draw to that product and it still can be purchased today for under $300. Many imitators followed and we’re still seeing 144Hz screens coming from every major display company.

The next big thing to appear were the competing frame-rate-matching technologies, Nvidia’s G-Sync and AMD’s FreeSync. With cheaper video cards unable to hit the high refresh rates gaming monitors are capable of, there had to be some way to improve the experience without simply adding more expensive processing power.

G-Sync came out first but immediately added a price bump of at least $200. About a year later, manufacturers finally started adding FreeSync to product lines and now we can say there are enough options out there that we’re seeing prices drop.

Since FreeSync doesn’t require additional hardware is should, theoretically, add nothing to the price of a monitor. In reality it hasn’t quite been that way but today we’re checking out a new screen from Nixeus, the NX-VUE24A. With a 24-inch TN panel and FreeSync from 30-144Hz it’s the first such monitor to break the $300 barrier.

Specifications

In nearly every case when a monitor category sees a significant price drop it’s because a TN panel is in use. Despite flaws in the viewing angle department, it is still the easiest way to create a responsive monitor with fast refresh and low input lag. Here Nixeus is using a 24-inch LED panel from AU Optronics that runs natively at 144Hz. It is not overclocked or modified so it should run without issue at its full refresh rate. In our tests, it did so with nary a hiccup.

The best news besides the low price is a FreeSync range that covers a wide 30-144Hz. Since resolution is 1920x1080 pixels (92ppi), it’s possible to rock out some high framerates in demanding games without resorting to an expensive video card. All you have to do to keep motion processing smooth is turn on V-Sync to prevent the fps from climbing above 144.

Otherwise, the NX-VUE24A is a fairly straightforward package. There aren’t extra gaming picture modes or a fancy OSD controller or USB ports. But for less than $300, you get a color accurate screen that matches contrast with more expensive products and hits all the marks for both refresh rate and FreeSync operation. Let’s take a look.

  • utroz
    Not too bad for the price I guess..
    Reply
  • iam2thecrowe
    Just cant wait for the day where every monitor is freesync/gsync and dont have to toss up between features/price/panel quality so much to find what suits me best.
    Reply
  • thor220
    It's good to see Free-Sync monitors getting larger ranges, especially at this price point. I'm waiting for one's that can use the full Free-Sync spec down into the single digit FPS, that way even people with entry level cards will be able to benefit from this technology.

    No USB isn't a huge deal for 99% of the people and I don't think it should really be a strike against this monitor. Sure it's present on higher end models but who's to say that contributes to a monitor's worth in the first place? USB hubs are so cheap, I don't think anyone uses USB as a metric for picking a monitor.

    While they did fudge the brightness number, this monitor can still go above safe brightness settings. Unless you need to burn out your eyes, most people won't even notice it.

    Perplexed as to why "TN Panel" is listed as a con when in this very review it's stated that being a TN panel isn't indicative of poor quality or color. This monitor has good color, especially considering it's a gaming monitor.
    Reply
  • photonboy
    thor220,
    As said "viewing angles" are one drawback. As for color, the TN may not be "poor" but it is not as good as IPS (IPS has drawbacks like more ghosting though).

    Other:
    It should be "LCD panel" not "LED panel" in the article. It is an LED monitor but that just refers to the choice of backlight. The "panel" is the IPS, TN or other technology that filters the backlight to produce individual pixels.
    Reply
  • crisan_tiberiu
    Thor220, i dont know about the range of freesync and gsync on the low side, but under 24 Hz the slideshow effect kicks in. It is all about the human eye.
    Reply
  • iam2thecrowe
    16877315 said:
    Perplexed as to why "TN Panel" is listed as a con when in this very review it's stated that being a TN panel isn't indicative of poor quality or color. This monitor has good color, especially considering it's a gaming monitor.
    Coming from a TN panel to a VA panel, i would never go back to TN. Considering recent VA and IPS panels have low response (not quite as low as TN but good enough to minimize ghosting/blur), low input lag and high refresh rate capabilities, I would say they are now preferable over TN, but a premium price is normally paid. Maybe some competitive gamers may see TN as preferable for lower response times, but i would say most gamers aren't on a competitive level and can enjoy the higher image quality of a VA or IPS panel.
    Reply
  • quilciri
    response time and ghosting are separate issues. Refresh rate helps with ghosting, but response time does not. IPS/PLS panels are unfortunately not as good as TN (on average) with ghosting and overshoot (and of course, response time).

    http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles/response_time.htm
    http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles/motion_blur.htm
    Both technologies have not yet achieved the gold standard of response an motion clarity that was CRT, though :D
    Reply
  • DongleKin
    If you want to test freesync at low frame rates, just underclock the graphics card until you're in the 30s of FPS.
    Reply
  • milkod2001
    Unless you are professional FPS gamer who really needs very fast response times you might be better served with 27' 1440 PLS korean imports for the same price.
    Bigger screen and resolution not to mention colours.

    This monitor would be great if sold under $200. $350 for TN 1080p panel even with fast response time is a joke.
    Reply
  • quilciri
    16881305 said:
    Unless you are professional FPS gamer who really needs very fast response times you might be better served with 27' 1440 PLS korean imports for the same price.
    Bigger screen and resolution not to mention colours.

    This monitor would be great if sold under $200. $350 for TN 1080p panel even with fast response time is a joke.

    The Last widely manufactured overclockable Korean IPS, the QNIX 2710, has issues; one of which is being hit or miss when overclocking and getting the true frame rate you've overclocked to vs. skipping frames. It also has significant ghosting and overshoot. It's a good monitor, but definitely has compromises. "you get what you pay for" is true here.

    http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/qnix_qx2710.htm
    ...it's a damn shame about overlord computers; I hope Scribby recovers. Even so, I don't think the company was going to be around much longer with the falling prices of 120hz+ adaptive sync monitors.

    That reminds me... Manufacturer refurb'd Acer XG270HU's are on Ebay from the Acer store for $330 & free shipping right now. I totally bought one then posted on slickdeals :)
    Reply