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Nixeus PRO Vue 27P 27-inch IPS QHD Monitor Review

OSD Setup & Calibration

The OSD appears in the center of the screen by default but it is moveable. We slid it down to a corner to make calibration easier. It’s logically laid out but each function takes several key presses to activate. It’s a little clumsy, but once you have the PRO Vue 27P dialed in you won’t be using the menu often.

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The one glaring flaw is that you can’t see multiple settings at a glance. In each sub-menu, you must first select a function before you can see its value. Luckily, the monitor has everything you need to achieve accurate color and maximum contrast. The backlight’s output range is relatively small but you can hit a desired number with reasonable precision. Contrast is set correctly, as is gamma, so you won’t need to change those settings.

DCR is dynamic contrast and we suggest leaving that off. Main SR sounds like overdrive, and its options even suggest that feature. But it’s actually a sharpness control. Increasing the setting adds unsightly ringing artifacts and makes small text hard to read. Leave it off for the best image quality. Speaking of overdrive, there isn’t any; luckily, motion blur isn’t too bad so we didn’t miss the feature.

There are no picture modes, but the different color temp presets have varying properties. The default is 6500K, which presents a fairly cool white point, but more importantly limits output to 185cd/m2. That’s well shy of Nixeus claimed 400cd/m2. To increase the white level, select either sRGB or User Define. The latter unlocks RGB controls, which helped us dial in decent grayscale and gamma tracking.

Ergonomic options include OSD position, transparency, and timeout up to 120 seconds. You can also select from six languages. There’s a video input selector, and you can choose analog or digital audio sources. If you want to return the PRO Vue 27P to its factory defaults, the final menu has a reset function.

Calibration

Out of the box the PRO Vue 27P runs a little blue but tracks gamma well and hits sRGB color points with decent accuracy. Our main beef is that brightness is limited to 185cd/m2 in the 6500K color temp mode. sRGB increases output and improves white point accuracy. You can also adjust brightness and contrast if you wish. The best performance, however, is found in User Define. Not only can you tweak the RGB sliders, but output rises to a maximum of almost 300cd/m2. To get the best possible accuracy from your Nixeus, we suggest the following settings.

Nixeus PRO Vue 27P Calibration Settings
Brightness 200cd/m243
Brightness 200cd/m213
Brightness 200cd/m28
Brightness 200cd/m24
Contrast50
GammaOff
Color Temp User DefineRed 70, Green 69, Blue 73
  • sillynilly
    Junk. Wow basically the old Overlord housing and setup without the high refresh rate. I was surprised to hear Nixeus was still selling these cheap, low level monitors. Identical setups, and in many cases better monitors, can be had all over eBay for less with shipping direct from those Chinese and South Korean suppliers that Nixeus outsourced their parts and build from.
    Reply
  • nitrium
    Will someone ever do a 16:10 (2560x1600) 27" screen? I really miss that useful extra vertical real estate every time I use a 16:9 screen.
    Reply
  • sillynilly
    That would be tough since those are generally 30" monitors.
    Reply
  • bobbyturbopants
    sillynilly what do u run? i game on a 4k 60hz accer k242hqk , seems fine to me but may try a 144 monitor to see if i notice a diff
    Reply
  • nitrium
    19312512 said:
    That would be tough since those are generally 30" monitors.
    Not all of us have space (or money) for a 30"er. I just don't see why 16:10 gets no love from panel makers, because it's just... better (imo).

    Reply
  • PGFan1
    What would be great to see is if one of these companies took a 27" monitor (IPS panel) with multiple inputs and added a TV-like remote that allowed users to power on/off, change inputs, and allowed volume changes without scrolling through a menu. Few manufacturers seem to make a <28" TV that is higher than 720P these days in smaller forma factors, and even those seem to still be TN panels (horrible for TV because of poor off-axis viewing). For locations like bedrooms, the monitor could serve as a computer monitor and also a viewing source for cable television. Many do need need a TV tuner these days, as most providers require a decode box. Moreover, many bedrooms cannot accommodate a 32"+ TV that serves as a TV and a monitor (yes, I know some of you can and likely do). We have two TN panels on 23.6" TVs (FullHD) that I would like to replace with something better, but the market seems to have gotten no better than these 2009-2010 panels for the smaller size. Computer monitors have progressed so far-- just give me a usable remote!
    Reply
  • sillynilly
    19312683 said:
    sillynilly what do u run? i game on a 4k 60hz accer k242hqk , seems fine to me but may try a 144 monitor to see if i notice a diff

    I upgraded this year to the ROG Swift 34" Gsync from ASUS. Great monitor. I have an older 27" 1440 IPS for a second monitor.

    Before Gsync I would run 3 1440 panels - 1 Overlord and 2 Chinese eBay models from Yamakasi all overclocked.
    Reply