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Nixeus PRO Vue 27P 27-inch IPS QHD Monitor Review

Brightness & Contrast

To read about our monitor tests in depth, please check out Display Testing Explained: How We Test Monitors and TVs.  Brightness and Contrast testing is covered on page two.

Uncalibrated – Maximum Backlight Level

Today’s group includes only 27" monitors, but to keep things current we threw in a couple of gaming screens. The PRO Vue 27P’s closest matches are NEC’s EA275WMi and BenQ’s PD2700Q. Gamers will remember Dell’s SE2717H and AOC’s AG271QG from recent reviews. And we’ve thrown a curved VA display into the mix with AOC’s C2783FQ.

Nixeus claims 400cd/m2 max output for the PRO Vue 27P, but we could only coax 298.0267cd/m2 from our sample. This is a departure from the default settings, which topped out at 185cd/m2 in the 6500K color temp mode. We switched to User Define without making further adjustments to record our test result. There’s plenty of light available here, but brighter monitors are out there if you need more power.

Despite a mid-pack white level result, the black threshold is fairly high at .3835cd/m2. That results in a disappointing 777.1:1 contrast ratio. Accurate gamma and good color saturation make up for this shortfall somewhat, but we’d prefer to see a level closer to 1000:1.

Uncalibrated – Minimum Backlight Level

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Dropping brightness to zero results in an ideal 58.4222cd/m2; great for working or playing in a dark room. Contrast stays consistent at 775:1, which is good but still too low. Another thing we noticed is that the change in brightness with each click of the slider isn't linear. Brighter output levels have finer control resolution than dimmer ones. When you get below 100cd/m2 or so, each click can be as much as 5cd/m2. Not a big deal but it’s less precise than a more consistent control.

After Calibration to 200cd/m2

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After calibration, contrast is pretty much unchanged, which is a relief. You’ll see later that gamma and color saturation is pretty good, which helps image quality somewhat. The picture looks better than our contrast numbers suggest. You won’t mistake the PRO Vue 27P for a VA panel, but next to other IPS screens it doesn’t look too bad.

ANSI Contrast Ratio

ANSI contrast is lower than the sequential value mainly due to hotspots in the upper-left and lower-right corners. These areas show some visible light bleed which hurts the result. The rest of the screen looks fine and shows good delineation between dark and light objects. As this test is sample-specific, you may see better results from other examples.

  • sillynilly
    Junk. Wow basically the old Overlord housing and setup without the high refresh rate. I was surprised to hear Nixeus was still selling these cheap, low level monitors. Identical setups, and in many cases better monitors, can be had all over eBay for less with shipping direct from those Chinese and South Korean suppliers that Nixeus outsourced their parts and build from.
    Reply
  • nitrium
    Will someone ever do a 16:10 (2560x1600) 27" screen? I really miss that useful extra vertical real estate every time I use a 16:9 screen.
    Reply
  • sillynilly
    That would be tough since those are generally 30" monitors.
    Reply
  • bobbyturbopants
    sillynilly what do u run? i game on a 4k 60hz accer k242hqk , seems fine to me but may try a 144 monitor to see if i notice a diff
    Reply
  • nitrium
    19312512 said:
    That would be tough since those are generally 30" monitors.
    Not all of us have space (or money) for a 30"er. I just don't see why 16:10 gets no love from panel makers, because it's just... better (imo).

    Reply
  • PGFan1
    What would be great to see is if one of these companies took a 27" monitor (IPS panel) with multiple inputs and added a TV-like remote that allowed users to power on/off, change inputs, and allowed volume changes without scrolling through a menu. Few manufacturers seem to make a <28" TV that is higher than 720P these days in smaller forma factors, and even those seem to still be TN panels (horrible for TV because of poor off-axis viewing). For locations like bedrooms, the monitor could serve as a computer monitor and also a viewing source for cable television. Many do need need a TV tuner these days, as most providers require a decode box. Moreover, many bedrooms cannot accommodate a 32"+ TV that serves as a TV and a monitor (yes, I know some of you can and likely do). We have two TN panels on 23.6" TVs (FullHD) that I would like to replace with something better, but the market seems to have gotten no better than these 2009-2010 panels for the smaller size. Computer monitors have progressed so far-- just give me a usable remote!
    Reply
  • sillynilly
    19312683 said:
    sillynilly what do u run? i game on a 4k 60hz accer k242hqk , seems fine to me but may try a 144 monitor to see if i notice a diff

    I upgraded this year to the ROG Swift 34" Gsync from ASUS. Great monitor. I have an older 27" 1440 IPS for a second monitor.

    Before Gsync I would run 3 1440 panels - 1 Overlord and 2 Chinese eBay models from Yamakasi all overclocked.
    Reply