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Nixeus PRO Vue 27P 27-inch IPS QHD Monitor Review

Conclusion

It’s well established that price is the most talked about subject in our reader comments. No matter how much technology or innovation is packed into a display, there are users who feel it costs too much. And since the upgrade path for monitors is much longer, we’re talking about a purchase that happens infrequently. Most people, us included, want to get years out of a panel; as many as possible.

For the patient, there are brands like Nixeus. Three years ago, a 27" IPS screen with QHD resolution would set you back at least $700 or more. Prices have come down quite a bit since then, but a scan of popular online vendors shows mainstream brands still charging around $450 for something comparable to the PRO Vue 27P. So this monitor represents a value choice, but if you think you’ll be picking this screen up for $200, well, we’re not quite there yet.

Our tests show the PRO Vue 27P to be capable of adequate performance. Out-of-box color isn’t too bad, but some tweaking is necessary to improve the white point and more importantly, maximize output. Rather than traditional picture modes, it seems that Nixeus is depending on color temp presets to tailor the monitor’s image quality. And the default setting doesn’t exploit its full potential. If you aren’t possessed of the equipment to calibrate, we strongly recommend dialing in our recommended settings. Otherwise you’ll be wasting an opportunity to get the most from this display.

Our two main complaints center around contrast and the included stand. We understand the limitations of LCD panels when it comes to contrast, and IPS monitors all perform within a fairly small window. We’re not saying the PRO Vue 27P has poor performance in this area but our test results show it lags a bit behind the rest.

The stand is a place where smaller manufacturers often reduce costs. While it may seem insignificant next to the technology used, a well designed and built stand is not cheap to implement. In fairness to Nixeus, there are adjustable stands included with some of its other displays, but the PRO Vue 27P is something of a flagship and we think it deserves better. We’d also like to see a more efficiently designed OSD. Our setup and testing required an inordinate number of button presses to achieve results.

On the upside, this monitor is cheaper than its competition, if not by a lot; and it offers comparable color accuracy and a very clear picture courtesy of a very well made front screen layer. If your budget is stretched to the point where $50 will make a difference between TN or IPS (or FHD vs QHD), then the Nixeus PRO Vue 27P might just fill the bill.

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  • sillynilly
    Junk. Wow basically the old Overlord housing and setup without the high refresh rate. I was surprised to hear Nixeus was still selling these cheap, low level monitors. Identical setups, and in many cases better monitors, can be had all over eBay for less with shipping direct from those Chinese and South Korean suppliers that Nixeus outsourced their parts and build from.
    Reply
  • nitrium
    Will someone ever do a 16:10 (2560x1600) 27" screen? I really miss that useful extra vertical real estate every time I use a 16:9 screen.
    Reply
  • sillynilly
    That would be tough since those are generally 30" monitors.
    Reply
  • bobbyturbopants
    sillynilly what do u run? i game on a 4k 60hz accer k242hqk , seems fine to me but may try a 144 monitor to see if i notice a diff
    Reply
  • nitrium
    19312512 said:
    That would be tough since those are generally 30" monitors.
    Not all of us have space (or money) for a 30"er. I just don't see why 16:10 gets no love from panel makers, because it's just... better (imo).

    Reply
  • PGFan1
    What would be great to see is if one of these companies took a 27" monitor (IPS panel) with multiple inputs and added a TV-like remote that allowed users to power on/off, change inputs, and allowed volume changes without scrolling through a menu. Few manufacturers seem to make a <28" TV that is higher than 720P these days in smaller forma factors, and even those seem to still be TN panels (horrible for TV because of poor off-axis viewing). For locations like bedrooms, the monitor could serve as a computer monitor and also a viewing source for cable television. Many do need need a TV tuner these days, as most providers require a decode box. Moreover, many bedrooms cannot accommodate a 32"+ TV that serves as a TV and a monitor (yes, I know some of you can and likely do). We have two TN panels on 23.6" TVs (FullHD) that I would like to replace with something better, but the market seems to have gotten no better than these 2009-2010 panels for the smaller size. Computer monitors have progressed so far-- just give me a usable remote!
    Reply
  • sillynilly
    19312683 said:
    sillynilly what do u run? i game on a 4k 60hz accer k242hqk , seems fine to me but may try a 144 monitor to see if i notice a diff

    I upgraded this year to the ROG Swift 34" Gsync from ASUS. Great monitor. I have an older 27" 1440 IPS for a second monitor.

    Before Gsync I would run 3 1440 panels - 1 Overlord and 2 Chinese eBay models from Yamakasi all overclocked.
    Reply