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ViewSonic VP2771 Professional Monitor Review

Gamma Response

We found a number of different gamma interpretations in the VP2771’s various modes. Native looks pretty good out of the box with just two slight dips at 10 and 90%. They are invisible to the naked eye. Rec.709 looks a little dark, but it also has a familiar appearance. Could it perhaps be BT.1886? Our recalculated chart says yes! Very few monitors conform to BT.1886, which is becoming more common in video post-production. Some HDTVs support it, but most computer monitors still aim for the 2.2 power function for maximum compatibility with content both new and old. Our only complaint here is that ViewSonic doesn’t simply offer a labeled preset in the OSD.

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In the Advanced Mode, you’ll need to perform a calibration to get the gamma tracking right. Otherwise, the image starts to wash out as it gets brighter. Selecting the 2.2 preset along with RGB adjustments gets the line pretty close to 2.2. The same dips occur at 10 and 90% and the entire line rides just below the standard. But visually, there are no issues to speak of.

Comparisons

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The comparison charts represent our manually calibrated values. This is about the best the VP2771 can do, which is solid. The range of values is fairly tight, and an average of 2.13 puts the deviation at 3.18% off the mark. It’s a small error to be sure; not enough to harm the color tracking results which we’ll get to now.


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  • shpankey
    $499 on amazon as we speak
    Reply
  • milkod2001
    Enjoying my $300 Qnix 1440p monitor for last 3years. Now i see the same specs monitor maybe slightly better colours out of the box for $499... NO Quantum Dot, tech, NO HDR, No Qsync/Free Sync2 nothing. NO sale for me, sorry.
    Reply