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EVGA's Monstrous DG-87 Chassis May Actually Deserve 'VR-Ready' Status

At CES in January we saw EVGA’s concept for a new case, but at that time it didn’t have a name. In the meantime EVGA has been pretty quiet about the chassis. Now, at Computex we know more. For example, it’s called the DG-87, and while EVGA didn't blather on about this case being "VR-Ready," it's actually ideal for a high-performance living room VR machine.

The case is huge. We’re not sure about the exact dimensions, but the fact that it has enough room behind the motherboard tray for two 3.5” hard drives should at least tell you something (yes, two thick 3.5” hard drives, not just SSDs). It is made of steel, plastic, and has an acrylic side panel.

Whereas most cases are meant to be oriented with with their length perpendicular to your monitor, the DG-87 is meant to be oriented in line with it, which is also why the front I/O and fan controls are actually on the side of the case. It’s a little unusual, but imagine if you’re using this PC in a living room for VR: placing it with its longest side against a wall gives you more space to walk around, therefore reducing the odds of running into it with room-scale VR.

The interior of the case is also very spacious, offering room for E-ATX motherboards, four dual-slot graphics cards, and a large enough PSU to power all that, not to mention a handful of drives. The front and rear (or should I say, left and right?) of the case have intake and exhaust fans respectively, however, the rear (or where the rear I/O is placed) has the fans behind it, pulling the air through. This gives a very clean aesthetic, hiding the rear I/O entirely. The exhaust also pulls the air through the graphics cards, which EVGA claims helps cooling by a fair margin.

The front I/O of the DG-87 is all but ordinary also. There is a three-zone fan controller with a display that shows the duty cycle of the selected zone, and there is a “K” button, which sets all the fans to 100 percent and overclocks the system. If you’ve got EVGA’s Precision X software installed it will run the graphics card at its highest boost speed, and you can even configure it to overclock the CPU. Front I/O connectors include the usual pair of HD audio jacks, two USB 3.0 ports, an HDMI port, and a USB Type-C port – ideal for a VR setup.

Because the case is built to be used on both a desk and a living room floor, EVGA also placed extra power and reset switches at the top of the case along with two USB 2.0 ports, alleviating the need for you to get on your knees to switch the system on if you opt to keep it on the floor.

EVGA did not specify when we would be seeing the case on store shelves or what it would cost, but the unit does look like it's nearing its final design, so it won't be too long.

Follow Niels Broekhuijsen @NBroekhuijsen. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

  • Unolocogringo
    So somebody finally made a case with my idea of placing fans at the rear of the case to pull hot graphics card air out of the case through the pci slots.
    Finally someone listened.
    Oh and in case you were wondering I started doing it with a pair of GTX 460s overclocked to 850 core. Lots oh heat produced with those.
    Reply
  • clonazepam
    It's a really nice case. It's too nice for me though. In my environment, I'd be compelled to clean the thing far too often. The amount of detail (and likely price) deserves to be meticulously cleaned and I'd just never be up to it.

    This gives a very clean anesthetic, hiding the rear I/O entirely.

    aesthetic
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    18049163 said:
    It's a really nice case. It's too nice for me though. In my environment, I'd be compelled to clean the thing far too often. The amount of detail (and likely price) deserves to be meticulously cleaned and I'd just never be up to it.

    This gives a very clean anesthetic, hiding the rear I/O entirely.

    aesthetic

    Lol
    Reply
  • N.Broekhuijsen
    This gives a very clean anesthetic, hiding the rear I/O entirely.

    Damn autocorrect. All fixed now.
    Reply
  • N.Broekhuijsen
    This gives a very clean anesthetic, hiding the rear I/O entirely.

    Damn autocorrect. All fixed now.
    Reply
  • apazeus
    In my humble opinion, part of the reason the PC industry seems to be plateauing in terms of growth is because, over the past few years, hardware has become good enough that it can all handle the average user's needs without needing to be replaced for a long time. It's interesting to see a company like AMD focus so heavily on all-in-one chips. This segment has a legitimate shot to become THE segment within the no too distant future.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    If you're rich enough to have a dedicated game room and host VR parties, it would make sense to have a nice showcase system. like this. I'm thinking of the kind of people who build home theaters that are like miniature movie theaters.

    I won't be buying one, if anyone cares. I like my cases unobtrusive, understated, and functional (not to mention reasonably priced). I don't even go for side windows.
    Reply
  • DookieDraws
    Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you, the all new EVGA HERNIA gaming case. This case will surely live up to it's name when you attempt to lift it. :P
    Reply
  • mortsmi7
    Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you, the all new EVGA HERNIA gaming case. This case will surely live up to it's name when you attempt to lift it. :P
    I've got one of those now, Corsair edition. I've had a 512GB ssd sitting around for months now that needs to be installed.
    Reply
  • mortsmi7
    Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you, the all new EVGA HERNIA gaming case. This case will surely live up to it's name when you attempt to lift it. :P
    I've got one of those now, Corsair edition. I've had a 512GB ssd sitting around for months now that needs to be installed.
    Reply