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Samsung Unleashes Five New Curved Monitors

Image: Samsung Tomorrow

Looking to purchase a new monitor for your desktop? Why not take the plunge into the curved display market, as Samsung has added five new models to its curved monitor family, ranging from 23.5 inches to 29 inches. These include the SE790C Series, the SE590C series and the SE591C Series.

Samsung indicated in its Samsung Tomorrow blog that the monitors have a curve that complements the human eye, meaning users may have a more comfortable experience when viewing the contents on the screen, even in the dark. In essence, the displays are designed to provide less eye strain and a reduced amount of reflections.

For instance, the eye-saver mode lowers eye strain by reducing the amount of blue light emitting from the screen. The panels also use Samsung's flicker-free technology, which reduces the amount of flickering that's associated with your typical monitor. Add these two technologies together, and users presumably can sit in front of the screen with less eye fatigue and for longer durations.

Samsung provided five monitors with two different curved form factors: the SE790C and the SE590C have a 3000R radius curvature, and the SE591C and the two SE510C panels sport a 4000R radius curvature. The SE510C panels are considered the entry level offerings of the group, while the SE790C is the flagship panel.

The SE790C is a 29-inch monitor with a 21:9 aspect ratio and a 2560 x 1080 resolution. Additional hardware specs include a 4 ms response time, a brightness of 300 cd/m2, a contrast ratio of 3000:1, support for 16.7 million colors and 178 degree viewing angles.

The SE590C is a bit larger, a 31.5-inch panel with a 16:9 aspect ratio and a 1920 x 1080 resolution. This panel also has a 4 ms response time but a higher contrast ratio of 5000:1. This display also includes a brightness of 350 cd/m2, 178 degree viewing angles and support for 16.7 million colors. Like the SE790C, this panel comes in black and metallic silver colors.

In the 4000R group, Samsung is launching the SE591C curved monitor measuring 27 inches. This panel has a 16:9 aspect ratio, a 1920 x 1080 resolution, a response time of 4 ms and a brightness of 350 cd/m2. Rounding out this monitor is a contrast ratio of 3000:1, support for 16.7 million colors, 178 degree viewing angles and a white high glossy form factor.

Finally, we have the SE510C, which comes in 23.5-inch and 27-inch sizes. Both panels have a 16:9 aspect ratio, a 1920 x 1080 resolution and a response time of 4 ms. Other features include a brightness of 250 cd/m2, a contrast ratio of 3000:1, support for 16.7 million colors and 178 degree viewing angles. Both are shipped in a black form factor.

Samsung didn't provide actual availability and pricing on the blog. However, the company already offers a 34-inch model costing $1,059.95 and up on Amazon and four other online retailers, and a 27-inch model costing $399.99.

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  • moogleslam
    Nope, nothing comes close to changing my mind about my next monitor. Still the Acer Predator XR341CK
    Reply
  • WFang
    Maybe I'm a closed minded hater in this particular subject matter, but I don't believe that the slightly curved screens have any place on my desk or in my living room. In a movie theater type setting, sure.. but when the viewing distance is inches to 'several' feet, I just don't see it as more than a stupid gimmick and the sooner it 'goes away' the happier I will be.
    Reply
  • moogleslam
    15537619 said:
    Maybe I'm a closed minded hater in this particular subject matter, but I don't believe that the slightly curved screens have any place on my desk or in my living room. In a movie theater type setting, sure.. but when the viewing distance is inches to 'several' feet, I just don't see it as more than a stupid gimmick and the sooner it 'goes away' the happier I will be.

    It's the exact same concept at home as in a movie theatre. On a flat monitor, the edges are further from your eyes than the center. Curving it makes the viewing distance to all parts of the monitor equal. This eliminates color changes at the edges. It absolutely has a place on our desks! It will never go away! All reviews of curved monitors have been very positive so far!
    Reply
  • thor220
    Large price tags but they are missing features a large portion of the PC gaming market is going to want. High resolutions and G-Sync or Free-Sync/low response time/ high refresh rate.

    If they are targeting professionals, they better think twice. They can get better color reproduction at a much lower price point.
    Reply
  • thor220
    15537619 said:
    Maybe I'm a closed minded hater in this particular subject matter, but I don't believe that the slightly curved screens have any place on my desk or in my living room. In a movie theater type setting, sure.. but when the viewing distance is inches to 'several' feet, I just don't see it as more than a stupid gimmick and the sooner it 'goes away' the happier I will be.

    It's the exact same concept at home as in a movie theatre. On a flat monitor, the edges are further from your eyes than the center. Curving it makes the viewing distance to all parts of the monitor equal. This eliminates color changes at the edges. It absolutely has a place on our desks! It will never go away! All reviews of curved monitors have been very positive so far!


    I agree that curved monitors are awesome for desktop use. If only these companies didn't charge such crazy prices for them.
    Reply
  • burkhartmj
    15537619 said:
    Maybe I'm a closed minded hater in this particular subject matter, but I don't believe that the slightly curved screens have any place on my desk or in my living room. In a movie theater type setting, sure.. but when the viewing distance is inches to 'several' feet, I just don't see it as more than a stupid gimmick and the sooner it 'goes away' the happier I will be.

    The irony is that most people feel exactly the opposite. The distance you sit from a TV or theatre screen is just too damn far to reap any benefits from a slight curve this article on Ars Technica about it]. A monitor on the other hand is close enough where a curve can actually have a benefit and enhance immersion in games.
    Reply
  • WFang
    15537619 said:
    Maybe I'm a closed minded hater in this particular subject matter, but I don't believe that the slightly curved screens have any place on my desk or in my living room. In a movie theater type setting, sure.. but when the viewing distance is inches to 'several' feet, I just don't see it as more than a stupid gimmick and the sooner it 'goes away' the happier I will be.

    The irony is that most people feel exactly the opposite. The distance you sit from a TV or theatre screen is just too damn far to reap any benefits from a slight curve this article on Ars Technica about it]. A monitor on the other hand is close enough where a curve can actually have a benefit and enhance immersion in games.

    Thanks for the link.. I'll amend my prior statement to say I don't envision wanting a fixed curved TV in my house, but perhaps I should not be so quick to dismiss curved screen(s) on my (work) desk.
    Reply
  • therealduckofdeath
    Maybe I'm a closed minded hater in this particular subject matter, but I don't believe that the slightly curved screens have any place on my desk or in my living room. In a movie theater type setting, sure.. but when the viewing distance is inches to 'several' feet, I just don't see it as more than a stupid gimmick and the sooner it 'goes away' the happier I will be.
    You do get an very noticeable "tube effect" with a flat monitor. I have a 24" and it definitely does not look flat to me when I'm sitting in front of it.
    Reply
  • synphul
    I think it's amusing just watching the trends of tech. It used to be crt type screens (including older tvs) were very convex, fishbowl in appearance. The idea was to make the image visible to a wider area. This was reduced until we had flat screens (crt) and flat panels. Now the latest is concave designs. I've seen complaints of lcd screen flicker and yet I thought that was supposed to be one of the major improvements over crt tech, no flicker. We've gone from an imaging tech capable of no lag/ghosting, wide viewing angles with accurate color reproduction and true blacks (crt) to splitting it up into different panel segments. Now you either get fast response and poor blacks and viewing angles with poor color reproduction or good colors and deeper blacks but with lag and ghosting. I'm almost afraid for tech to 'improve' any further. Gimmicks make the world go round I suppose.
    Reply
  • Larry Litmanen
    This is why at tech lovers we need to support retail establishments like Best Buy and MicroCenter especially. If you want to spend $500 on a monitor you'd want to at the very least see it in person, with these stores dying out you sort of just relying on the opinion of some YouTube dude. Especially the curvature, you need to see that in person.

    As far as MicroCenter, it's like last place in USA where you can go and actually touch and see a PC case, see multiple motherboards, see other components.
    Reply