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Vega Reloaded: AMD Ryzen 5000 Cezanne iGPU Exposed In New Benchmarks

AMD Ryzen Mobile Processor

AMD Ryzen Mobile Processor (Image credit: AMD)

Renowned tipster @_rogame has shared his findings on five alleged benchmarks for AMD's Ryzen 5000-series (codename Cezanne) processors. The precise nomenclature is uncertain, but the SiSoftware submissions should be for the next generation of APUs.

Currently, there are no codenames or OPN (Ordering Part Number) for the mysterious APUs. SiSoftware picked up the processor as "AMD Celadon-CZN Renoir." If you recall, Celadon was also the call sign for motherboards that had appeared previously with Renoir. CZN is probably the abbreviation for Cezanne.

There's still a lot of unknowns surrounding Cezanne. However, many speculate that Cezanne will tap into AMD's Zen 3 microarchitecture. One thing's for sure, though: The APUs should still be based on TSMC's 7nm FinFET manufacturing process. In regards to the graphics, Igor's Lab has found preliminary evidence that leads us to believe that Cezanne, like Renoir, continues to depend on the Vega microarchitecture. More specifically, Cezanne may land with a Vega 20-based iGPU.

AMD Ryzen 5000 Cezanne Specifications

ProcessorCores / ThreadsBase / Boost Clocks (GHz)Vega Compute UnitsGraphics Frequency (MHz)
AMD Celadon-CZN Renoir*??81,850
Ryzen 7 4800U8 / 161.8 / 4.281,750

*Specifications are unconfirmed.

Unfortunately for us, there are no processor benchmarks for Cezanne. The five entries correspond to the APU's integrated graphical performance. In terms of specifications, this anonymous Cezanne sample comes equipped with eight Vega compute units (CUs), or 512 stream processor (SPs), that clock up to 1,850 MHz.

For comparison, the current Ryzen 7 4800U also rocks eight Vega compute units that tick at 1,750 MHz. We can't say for sure if the Cezanne chip is the successor for the Ryzen 7 4800U. If it is, then the iGPU in Cezanne appears to max out at eight Vega CUs like Renoir, but with improved clock speeds.

AMD Ryzen 50000 Cezanne (Image credit: SiSoftware)

The hardware sleuth provided a submission for a Lenovo Yoga (14sARE) laptop with a Ryzen 7 4800U and LPDDR4X-4266 memory for comparison. The Cezanne processor is likely an engineering sample, so take the results with a pinch of salt. The submissions give us a general idea of AMD's progress on the iGPU side of the processor.

ProcessorGP (GPU) Processing (Mpix/s)GP (GPU) Memory Bandwidth (GB/s)GP (GPU) Cryptography (High Security) (GB/s)GP (GPU) Financial Analysis (Normal/Single Precision) (kOPTS)GP (GPU) Scientific Analysis (Normal/Single Precision) (GFLOPS)
AMD Celadon-CZN Renoir*1,265.6722.4510.85602.07181.14
Ryzen 7 4800U1,187.1728.83N/A570.46164.87

The Cezanne iGPU was 6.6% faster than the Ryzen 7 4800U in the GP (GPU) Processing benchmark. The Ryzen 7 4800U outperformed the Cezanne chip in the Memory Bandwidth benchmark by up to 28.4%, mainly due to having the advantage of the LPDDR4X memory. 

In the other benchmarks, the Cezanne unit outperformed the Renoir by 5.5% and 9.9% in the GP (GPU) Financial Analysis (Normal/Single Precision) and GP (GPU) Scientific Analysis (Normal/Single Precision) tests, respectively.

AMD's Ryzen 5000-series APUs are expected to hit the shelves next year. No one knows exactly when, but as time progresses, we'll probably get to see more leaks on what AMD is cooking.

  • Rdslw
    Without power figures its pointless .. ~6% for 10% power -> bad
    ~6% with identical power or less -> nice, especially for laptop parts.
    Reply
  • thedillyo
    22 October release ;)
    Reply
  • watzupken
    I feel it is a little too early to say if this is the graphic config for the top end Ryzen 5xxx APU. I believe I read somewhere that AMD confirmed that they will still stick to Vega for the APU for another generation, before moving on to RDNA2. But I am sure AMD will not sit idle by retaining Vega 8 for their top end APU, when Intel Xe is threatening to dethrone their graphic edge. I do suspect that AMD may introduce Vega 10 or 11 for their next gen top end APU.
    Reply
  • Umfriend
    Wouldn't the APU GFX performance benefit hugely from a quad-channel RAM controller?
    Reply
  • neojack
    the APU 4000 are not even available officialy in stores yet lol

    those AMD engineers are on steroids
    Reply
  • Avro Arrow
    As interesting as this is, I find most desktop-based IGPs to be more or less irrelevant for the vast majority of us. True, there are those for whom IGPs in desktops are a godsend but their needs tend to be so pedestrian that even Intel graphics would be enough for them. Attaching these GPUs to low-powered CPUs makes the most sense as even the current Athlons make for great HTPCs.

    Vega was a disappointment, no doubt, but that was for high-end gaming. However, for an IGP, it is spectacular and if it's less expensive for ATi to produce Vega than RDNA, so much the better for AMD's pricing on these APUs. I really think that AMD made the right choice here. Save your more expensive bullets for your bigger guns.
    Reply
  • deksman
    Rdslw said:
    Without power figures its pointless .. ~6% for 10% power -> bad
    ~6% with identical power or less -> nice, especially for laptop parts.

    Since Zen 3 will be manufactured on NP7 which allows either 10% improved efficiency or up to 7% greater performance (compared to existing 7nm node), I'd say its 6% more performance at same power consumption.

    To be fair, it would have been better if AMD incorporated say 2 more CU's instead of just raising clocks.
    Reply
  • deksman
    Umfriend said:
    Wouldn't the APU GFX performance benefit hugely from a quad-channel RAM controller?

    Well, going from dual to quad channel would nearly double the available bandwidth, but in laptops, you don't usually get more than 2 RAM slots (unless you're getting a high powered machine which can also be described as a desktop replacement that comes with 4 RAM slots - and those are usually more expensive than the lot), so dual-channel is often seen as 'enough'.

    I do think AMD is a bit late with incorporating dual-channel, but in all honesty, apart from the desktop iGP, the whole system wouldn't really benefit from it (and laptops with APU's don't usually get 4 RAM slots).
    Reply
  • deksman
    Avro Arrow said:
    As interesting as this is, I find most desktop-based IGPs to be more or less irrelevant for the vast majority of us. True, there are those for whom IGPs in desktops are a godsend but their needs tend to be so pedestrian that even Intel graphics would be enough for them. Attaching these GPUs to low-powered CPUs makes the most sense as even the current Athlons make for great HTPCs.

    Vega was a disappointment, no doubt, but that was for high-end gaming. However, for an IGP, it is spectacular and if it's less expensive for ATi to produce Vega than RDNA, so much the better for AMD's pricing on these APUs. I really think that AMD made the right choice here. Save your more eexpensive bullets for your bigger guns.

    Vega was revamped for Renoir (they call it 'enhanced Vega').
    AMD managed to increase each Vega core performance by 56%. About 15% of this performance came from clock increases (which was afforded by the 7nm node), however, 41% of the performance improvements came from pure uArch enhancements.

    In essence, AMD made 'enhanced Vega' to resemble Navi in performance and efficiency.

    Vega wasn't really a disappointment... I am rocking a Vega 56 in my Acer Predator Helios 500 laptop (PH517-61). Its running fast, cool and quiet when fully stressed and its hard limited to 120W (which isn't even fully used - I can easily OC it on to 1450MhZ on core and 900/950MhZ on HBM without exceeding 120W and I'm just a hair from reaching GTX 1080/Vega 64).

    The reason I went with Vega in that laptop is because it comes with large amount of compute performance (which is useful for my content creation)... and the laptop is a desktop replacement.

    I can easily run any game maxed out... and I'm barely getting to 65 degrees Celsius when gaming (with the laptop being generally barely audible in the process).

    Vega needs appropriate voltage/frequency modulation to make it tick appropriately.
    AMD overvolted the heck out of Vega on desktop (which is why it was sucking a lot of power), but it could be undervolted to bring that well under control and improve thermal efficiency as well as performance.

    Not sure what was the problem... the fact it didn't compete with 1080ti?
    Well, I'm not bothered by that because most of the money is in the mid-range anyway.
    Besides, getting too high powered GPU's can be expensive... so why bother when I can easily get the same or better performance with better power consumption in next generation of GPU's?
    Reply
  • deksman
    watzupken said:
    I feel it is a little too early to say if this is the graphic config for the top end Ryzen 5xxx APU. I believe I read somewhere that AMD confirmed that they will still stick to Vega for the APU for another generation, before moving on to RDNA2. But I am sure AMD will not sit idle by retaining Vega 8 for their top end APU, when Intel Xe is threatening to dethrone their graphic edge. I do suspect that AMD may introduce Vega 10 or 11 for their next gen top end APU.

    This is what I'm thinking as well.
    Enhanced Vega is great, but one of its problems is that its lacking in CU's.
    AMD would do well to introduce an APU with 10 and possibly 12 CU's for iGP Vega.
    It would increase performance by quite a bit.
    Reply